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(Yahoo)   It's not transparent aluminum, but covid-killing stainless steel is the hero we need right now   (news.yahoo.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Influenza, stainless steel, Corrosion, Microbiology, Virus, infectious viruses, high copper content of the new metal, public areas  
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690 clicks; posted to STEM » on 07 Dec 2021 at 10:05 AM (24 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



19 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-12-07 10:01:29 AM  
you can't kill something that isn't alive
 
2021-12-07 10:11:47 AM  
You can get a really nice pattern when you mix two or more metals but I don't think its antibacterial

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^ mokume
 
2021-12-07 10:24:23 AM  
Can't wait to see how much it costs.
 
2021-12-07 10:25:55 AM  
I knew brass is a pretty good compromise between maintenance requirements and natural antibacterial qualities, but I was unaware there were anti-viral materials.

/Obviously excluding 'lava', or anything else hot enough to cook 'em to bits
 
2021-12-07 10:34:14 AM  
So they have learned the Riddle of Steel?
 
2021-12-07 10:35:35 AM  
No it's not.
 
2021-12-07 10:36:24 AM  

Mad_Radhu: So they have learned the Riddle of Steel?


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would like to know more.
 
2021-12-07 10:56:31 AM  

khitsicker: Mad_Radhu: So they have learned the Riddle of Steel?

[i.pinimg.com image 400x512]

would like to know more.


That was from when he was young and stupid. The power of flesh is far superior.
 
2021-12-07 11:29:34 AM  
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antimicrobial_properties_of_copper


There is a good reason everything in hospitals used to be plated or just made of copper for touching surfaces
 
2021-12-07 11:45:54 AM  

cretinbob: you can't kill something that isn't alive


True, but "covid-unviable-making stainless steel" just sounds awkward.

OTOH, since virii are just little protein boxes with a bio-program surprise inside, we could liken it to a computer program stored on some magnetic, optical or semiconductor medium.  What do we call it when we remove a program from such media?  "Delete" !

So I, for one, most decidedly welcome our new covid-deleting stainless steel countertops!
 
2021-12-07 12:19:33 PM  

lifeslammer: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antimicrobial_properties_of_copper


There is a good reason everything in hospitals used to be plated or just made of copper for touching surfaces


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And that's why I got these great socks! No bacteria and my toes no longer smell!
 
2021-12-07 12:20:33 PM  

I hereby demand that I be given a Fark account: No it's not.


Please elaborate.
 
2021-12-07 12:39:47 PM  
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2021-12-07 1:33:06 PM  
There is absolutely nothing notable about covid not living on a surface after 3 hours. On the other hand, the whole "and E. coli bacteria" bit could actually be quite important.
 
2021-12-07 3:40:09 PM  

Betep: I hereby demand that I be given a Fark account: No it's not.

Please elaborate.


He means you might need a Kleenex* or two.

*Kleenex(tm) is a registered trademark of Kimberly Clark.  All other trademarks belong to their respective holders or the people who have made them a common term.
 
2021-12-07 4:20:12 PM  
Summary of TFA: "we added copper to nichrome stainless."

I also LOLed when they described stainless steel as easily machinable. Any machinist will tell you that shiat is infamous for being the exact opposite. It work hardens and galls like a mofo. There's a reason stainless is usually marked for 1/10 the SFM of aluminum and 1/3 the SFM of generic steel on machining charts.

I had a friend working on a vacuum system tell me he once made the mistake of casually threading two stainless pieces together until they were fingertight... And they galled and were impossible to unscrew and just like that, $400 of parts down the drain.
 
2021-12-07 7:08:06 PM  
Can someone explain what makes a surface antimicrobial or antiviral?  I hope it is not relying on something consumable, like copper being leached away from the surface by viruses or bacteria.  I was never clear on whether the silver compounds used to make certain fabrics "antibacterial" were supposed to create a surface bacteria could not attach to, or were used up in the process of killing bacteria.
 
2021-12-07 7:22:07 PM  

erik-k: Summary of TFA: "we added copper to nichrome stainless."

I also LOLed when they described stainless steel as easily machinable. Any machinist will tell you that shiat is infamous for being the exact opposite. It work hardens and galls like a mofo. There's a reason stainless is usually marked for 1/10 the SFM of aluminum and 1/3 the SFM of generic steel on machining charts.

I had a friend working on a vacuum system tell me he once made the mistake of casually threading two stainless pieces together until they were fingertight... And they galled and were impossible to unscrew and just like that, $400 of parts down the drain.


Stainless Steel is not a metal, it is a bunch of different metals under the same name.  There are three different crystal structures, and a range of chemical compositions.  You can make decent nuts and bolts out of some of them.
 
2021-12-07 8:18:26 PM  

flondrix: Can someone explain what makes a surface antimicrobial or antiviral?  I hope it is not relying on something consumable, like copper being leached away from the surface by viruses or bacteria.  I was never clear on whether the silver compounds used to make certain fabrics "antibacterial" were supposed to create a surface bacteria could not attach to, or were used up in the process of killing bacteria.


My understanding is, both copper and silver have a habit of creating ion complexes that are quite deadly to microbes. It's also why copper salts (esp copper acetate) are, or at least were, used in weedkilling sprays - they're lethal to microbes and fungi, while humans will vomit before ingesting enough to cause real harm. It's also why it's absolutely essential to never, never, ever put copper salts down the drain.

They would both very slowly be used up by the process. With bulk metal in doorknobs or sheeting, you'd have to worry about dissolution caused by the acids in our meatpaws' sweat, and physical mechanical wear-out by hard particles when hands rub them, long before the amount used forming anti-microbe ions would be a problem. In socks... Yeah the antimicrobial action will probably (eventually) wear out via use-up of copper. But I don't know how much copper they actually weave into the stuff either.

And I will admit, my interactions have been with people using SS for vacuum equipment (including cryo-vacuum) which is a different beast from the stuff used to make kitchen sinks. The good news is, a cursory google suggests that adding copper generally improves machinability rather than hurting it.
 
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