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(The Conversation)   There's another pandemic sweeping the globe and we may not 'beetus it either   (theconversation.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Diabetes mellitus, Insulin, Diabetes mellitus type 1, Diabetes mellitus type 2, Health care, Diabetes, Africa, Obesity  
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1065 clicks; posted to STEM » on 06 Dec 2021 at 1:37 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



31 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-12-06 2:15:56 PM  
Whats that you say? time for a global ban of any sugar that doesnt come from a sugar cane or sugar beet? AND a mandatory maximum sugar content in beverages?
 
2021-12-06 2:35:07 PM  
Look at the main driver of Comorbidities for the present pandemic.   You've been in one pandemic.   Sure, some "healthy" people get really sick, but some people have bad reactions to the vaccines as well.

Obesity drives most of that.   If people would have gotten vaccinated at an acceptable rate, then we'd still have people claiming that losing weight is a long term.   Fad diets don't work, and some people do have metabolic issues, but most overweight people could have lost weight at a few pounds a month and we'd all save money if that happens
 
2021-12-06 2:35:16 PM  
I was pre-diabetic so I started eating less and now I'm not. Thinking about writing a self help book about it, but there's not much else to say.
 
2021-12-06 2:43:40 PM  

Uncontrolled_Jibe: Look at the main driver of Comorbidities for the present pandemic.   You've been in one pandemic.   Sure, some "healthy" people get really sick, but some people have bad reactions to the vaccines as well.

Obesity drives most of that.   If people would have gotten vaccinated at an acceptable rate, then we'd still have people claiming that losing weight is a long term.   Fad diets don't work, and some people do have metabolic issues, but most overweight people could have lost weight at a few pounds a month and we'd all save money if that happens


A few pounds a month? 3500 calories in a pound of fat. at an absolute minimum you gotta cut 500 calories a day (Though that is only a short-term fix). When you're poor, you can't make easy food subtitutions, and healthy options are hard to come by. Cheap food is loaded  with fillers, sugar and salt that make it satisfying but less good. And because it's satisfying but not satiating, you want more.

There's a lot more then just "Lose a few pounds."

/lost over 300 at one point
//now about 200 pounds, had a bad run of unemployment and depression
 
2021-12-06 3:07:01 PM  
I also read somewhere that sitting for an extended period sharply increases insulin resistance.
 
2021-12-06 3:09:57 PM  
I thought I read that one of the gifts that keep giving from being infected with COVID is the 'beetus for some people.  Where's Wilford Brimley when you need him...oh, yeah, dead. Oh, well!
 
2021-12-06 3:11:02 PM  
I've dropped about 10 lbs in the past month just by not driving a truck over the road and doing basic stuff around the house like cooking and shopping.But I started at 355 lbs so just moving my bulk around probably counts as cardio at this point. I applied at a truck wash just to keep moving, but without the lifting requirements most places need. You use hoses and long handled brushes in teams of like six or so to wash trucks, so lots of movement but not back-destroying like warehouse work can be.

One thing they did not address is that some percent of people hospitalized with Covid-19 leave with diabetes they did not have before getting sick. Like what, 16%? I forget the exact number, it was between 10 and 20%. That is a LOT of extra cases. Of course that leaves you weaker for the next thing that comes around, like Covid-19.

The main thing that I noticed was that they put Type I and Type 2 diabetes into the same pool. The last study I saw said that most people who manage to lose 10% of their body weight after being diagnosed with Type 2 are fine afterwards as long as they keep the weight off. Too much fat pressing on the pancreas seems to mess it up. If you keep the weight on too long after you become diabetic, then it can be permanent but for most people just losing, say, 30 lbs out of 300 within 5 years of diagnosis is enough to allow the pancreas to recover. There's about 20% that did not happen with in the study, which still vastly outnumbers the Type I diabetics but is significantly lower than what we have today and means that at least in more developed countries we can afford to treat them. The issue is why we gain weight so much in the first place. Fix that issue and a lot of crap goes away. But that issue is related to food processing and marketing, manipulation of ingredients to induce craving that can overcome your thinking part of the brain, and that eating junk just makes us feel better when we're down.

\core strength has gotten to where I can get off the floor without needing a chair or table or box to cling to
\\and I can walk through a mall with my wife for a few hours instead of like two
\\\getting away from the constant parade of fast food at truck stops is helpful, sure they have salads but if you've ever tried a Flying J salad... ugh
 
2021-12-06 3:11:32 PM  

saintstryfe: When you're poor, you can't make easy food subtitutions, and healthy options are hard to come by.


That's a myth that needs to die if we're ever to tackle the obesity epidemic.  It's about as accurate as saying that ivermectin is an approved treatment for COVID.

https://theconversation.com/myth-healt​hy-food-is-more-expensive-than-unhealt​hy-food-101213

The writer is in England, but the points she makes are just as valid in the US.
 
2021-12-06 3:31:20 PM  

The Crepes of Wrath: saintstryfe: When you're poor, you can't make easy food subtitutions, and healthy options are hard to come by.

That's a myth that needs to die if we're ever to tackle the obesity epidemic.  It's about as accurate as saying that ivermectin is an approved treatment for COVID.

https://theconversation.com/myth-healt​hy-food-is-more-expensive-than-unhealt​hy-food-101213

The writer is in England, but the points she makes are just as valid in the US.


You have 40 bucks for the entire week of food. How do you spend it to make sure day 7 isnt moldy slimy stuff?
 
2021-12-06 3:33:17 PM  

The Crepes of Wrath: saintstryfe: When you're poor, you can't make easy food subtitutions, and healthy options are hard to come by.

That's a myth that needs to die if we're ever to tackle the obesity epidemic.  It's about as accurate as saying that ivermectin is an approved treatment for COVID.

https://theconversation.com/myth-healt​hy-food-is-more-expensive-than-unhealt​hy-food-101213

The writer is in England, but the points she makes are just as valid in the US.


Have you ever been at the corner of The and Hood? Fresh food? What's that? Food deserts are a thing in the US. They aren't in most other countries. The study done in Australia that's always referenced as "refuting" the food desert hypothesis in the US says nothing about the situation in the US and just points to the differences between the two countries.

I'll give you this though, we have Dollar General. Some of their stores have produce. I don't know how many. Within a 30 minute drive I have two Walmart supercenters and three Dollar Generals. One Dollar General has a produce section and when they have stuff in stock it looks and tastes a lot better than the sad shiat I see in Walmart's produce.

But when I lived in Indianapolis, there was not one grocery store within the Mile Square (basically, the original plat of Indianapolis). There might be now, dunno. You had convenience stores. There had been an active movement toward community gardening but that ended due to two things. One was that the lots used for that were specifically targeted by developers to kickstart "urban renewal" projects that basically kicked out most of the people already there. The other was that the soil was contaminated with heavy metals from before zoning was a thing and you had coal-fired industry in every block of the city that basically contaminated everything. Plants tend to concentrate toxins in their fruits, where at least they won't harm the plant even if it renders the seeds sterile. That community gardening initiative resulted in a lot of heavy metal poisoning of kids, and now people know not to garden in their back yards, so no cheap homegrown veggies. So convenience stores it is, once again, for the urban poor. And again this is from a decade ago but the bus service still followed the same basic routes that the trollies did before them when their goal was to take poor people to work as domestics for middle class and society households. They extended the routes out to the industrial parks so people could get to work and back home, but generally not to newer shopping centers where grocery stores still existed. You COULD get to grocery stores by bus, but it might take you a couple hours each way with transfers, and that's if the bus you were transferring to didn't show up and leave two minutes before your bus arrived, which as someone who tried relying on IndyGo to get to work for a month, was not uncommon.

No transportation, no grocery stores in your neighborhood, soil is toxic from industrial contamination, you aren't going to be eating your veggies, you aren't going to be healthy into your later years. But we'll subsidize your treatments for your health problems, enough to keep you alive and hopefully working.

This stuff was specifically studied by the geography department I got my MS in GISc from, they tracked this shiat pretty closely, and the anthropology department I got my undergrad from worked closely on this stuff. Our archaeology field school was close to downtown Indianapolis and my mentor had to do soil testing because most properties he couldn't break ground without a hazmat setup and certification.
 
2021-12-06 3:35:53 PM  
My grandfather was diabetic, as is my morbidly obese Mormon sister.

A couple years ago someone told I could lose weight - without changing my lifestyle - if I cut carbs and sugar. At the time, I'd have a few pints at the brewery, each of which had about a full days worth of carbs.

It was hard at first, because I had relied on my rice steamer, or microwaving a potato, for most of my meals. Cutting sweets was easy. Pretty soon I was using a different hole in my belt. Then I moved to another town and the job fell through, and I ended up living in my car, so I quit drinking altogether to avoid getting a DUI while just sleeping in my car. Then I started losing quite a bit of weight. Being broke and homeless contributed of course, but it was cutting out the carbs from beer that made the weight drop off.

This year, the first weekend of September, I had an allergic reaction to a new brand I tried. Just two beers and I felt awful the whole next day. I've had that happen before, I think with certain varieties of hops, or maybe the yeast. It was also really smokey from wildfires that day, which makes my innards queasy anyway, so I never felt much better that day. Anyway, just haven't been in the mood for beer since then, and I've lost about 20 pounds in 3 months with no other significant changes.
 
2021-12-06 3:42:51 PM  
You dont need to eat "healthy" to not be obese your body cannot violate the laws of thermodynamics

If you want to lose weight, eat less, move more. It's that simple
 
2021-12-06 3:47:44 PM  
1) The idea that healthy food isn't really more expensive than unhealthy food depends on assuming a) access to food and b) access to time and tools for making it. When I'm working on appliances in a single wide they simply don't have many of the kitchen gadgets and cookware that healthy cookbooks assume you have.

2) if you read the TFA and see that about 5% of African men have diabetes then it's really not a matter of North American eating habits that's causing this to become a worldwide epidemic.

3) Obesity is rising in all mammalian species, not just hominids. In particular obesity tracks to urban areas near large rivers or the mouth of rivers. The closer a place is to the headwaters of a river or if it's far from a river, the more the obesity rate drops. It is logical to suppose a human-made chemical in our waters is part of the obesity and diabetes problem.

Look I understand, after having taken one cruise in my life, the frustration with walrus Americans eating enough calories in one meal to feed four people in Guatemala for the day. But until we get past the need to crap on people for how they eat, issues like diabetes and obesity are going to remain problems.
 
2021-12-06 3:48:50 PM  
"The continent's highest prevalence rate (11.3%) is in South Africa, where one in nine adults have diabetes: 4.2 million people. Yet almost half are undiagnosed."

Bind moggling work from the statisticians there.
 
2021-12-06 4:32:08 PM  
saintstryfe:
/lost over 300 at one point
//now about 200 pounds, had a bad run of unemployment and depression


If you work hard at it and lose another 300 pounds you'll probably perk right up!
 
2021-12-06 4:37:10 PM  

saintstryfe: Uncontrolled_Jibe: Look at the main driver of Comorbidities for the present pandemic.   You've been in one pandemic.   Sure, some "healthy" people get really sick, but some people have bad reactions to the vaccines as well.

Obesity drives most of that.   If people would have gotten vaccinated at an acceptable rate, then we'd still have people claiming that losing weight is a long term.   Fad diets don't work, and some people do have metabolic issues, but most overweight people could have lost weight at a few pounds a month and we'd all save money if that happens

A few pounds a month? 3500 calories in a pound of fat. at an absolute minimum you gotta cut 500 calories a day (Though that is only a short-term fix). When you're poor, you can't make easy food subtitutions, and healthy options are hard to come by. Cheap food is loaded  with fillers, sugar and salt that make it satisfying but less good. And because it's satisfying but not satiating, you want more.

There's a lot more then just "Lose a few pounds."

/lost over 300 at one point
//now about 200 pounds, had a bad run of unemployment and depression


Go be fat somewhere else
 
2021-12-06 4:43:15 PM  

lifeslammer: The Crepes of Wrath: saintstryfe: When you're poor, you can't make easy food subtitutions, and healthy options are hard to come by.

That's a myth that needs to die if we're ever to tackle the obesity epidemic.  It's about as accurate as saying that ivermectin is an approved treatment for COVID.

https://theconversation.com/myth-healt​hy-food-is-more-expensive-than-unhealt​hy-food-101213

The writer is in England, but the points she makes are just as valid in the US.

You have 40 bucks for the entire week of food. How do you spend it to make sure day 7 isnt moldy slimy stuff?


Easy:  Use your EBT card for whatever food you want.  The 40 bucks is for cigarettes.
 
2021-12-06 4:58:28 PM  
No worries! A medicine capable of helping called insulin was invented for just this ailment. The inventor, altruist that he was, offered it up for a buck! Given that America is a 'christian nation' you can bet this lifesaving medicine will be cheap and or free for the people how need it!
 
2021-12-06 5:03:56 PM  

BolloxReader: Have you ever been at the corner of The and Hood? Fresh food? What's that? Food deserts are a thing in the US. They aren't in most other countries. The study done in Australia that's always referenced as "refuting" the food desert hypothesis in the US says nothing about the situation in the US and just points to the differences between the two countries.


Yes, and not only do I currently live in one (based on the rural definition), I lived for many years in a food desert based on the urban definition.  You know how many people it impacts (because I took the time to Google that as well)?  About 7% of the US population.  70% of adults range anywhere from overweight to obese to morbidly obese.

Try again.
 
2021-12-06 5:09:27 PM  

lifeslammer: The Crepes of Wrath: saintstryfe: When you're poor, you can't make easy food subtitutions, and healthy options are hard to come by.

That's a myth that needs to die if we're ever to tackle the obesity epidemic.  It's about as accurate as saying that ivermectin is an approved treatment for COVID.

https://theconversation.com/myth-healt​hy-food-is-more-expensive-than-unhealt​hy-food-101213

The writer is in England, but the points she makes are just as valid in the US.

You have 40 bucks for the entire week of food. How do you spend it to make sure day 7 isnt moldy slimy stuff?


The same way I already do?  I go grocery shopping once per week, and have to drive 40 miles round trip to do so (I live in a rural area).  Do I occasionally end up with something rotten?  Sure, but it's pretty rare.
 
2021-12-06 5:10:19 PM  

Randrew: "The continent's highest prevalence rate (11.3%) is in South Africa, where one in nine adults have diabetes: 4.2 million people. Yet almost half are undiagnosed."

Bind moggling work from the statisticians there.


You gather 20 people. You ask them all if they have diabetes. One says yes. You test them all. You find two cases. Tada!
 
2021-12-06 5:12:52 PM  

BolloxReader: The study done in Australia that's always referenced as "refuting" the food desert hypothesis in the US says nothing about the situation in the US and just points to the differences between the two countries.


And FWIW, if you don't like the Australian study, Google the phrase "is healthy food more expensive than junk food."  You'll find plenty of links that say there's no difference or a slight difference.  Including, IIRC, the USDA.
 
2021-12-06 5:13:21 PM  

New Farkin User Name: Randrew: "The continent's highest prevalence rate (11.3%) is in South Africa, where one in nine adults have diabetes: 4.2 million people. Yet almost half are undiagnosed."

Bind moggling work from the statisticians there.

You gather 20 people. You ask them all if they have diabetes. One says yes. You test them all. You find two cases. Tada!


Say, you look different. Did you lose weight?  Did you get a new farkin user name?
 
2021-12-06 5:14:59 PM  

The Crepes of Wrath: BolloxReader: The study done in Australia that's always referenced as "refuting" the food desert hypothesis in the US says nothing about the situation in the US and just points to the differences between the two countries.

And FWIW, if you don't like the Australian study, Google the phrase "is healthy food more expensive than junk food."  You'll find plenty of links that say there's no difference or a slight difference.  Including, IIRC, the USDA.


I don't like the Aussie study, but only because of its terrible accent.

That's why I Google the phrase "junk food tastes better than healthy food"
 
2021-12-06 7:16:09 PM  

Randrew: New Farkin User Name: Randrew: "The continent's highest prevalence rate (11.3%) is in South Africa, where one in nine adults have diabetes: 4.2 million people. Yet almost half are undiagnosed."

Bind moggling work from the statisticians there.

You gather 20 people. You ask them all if they have diabetes. One says yes. You test them all. You find two cases. Tada!

Say, you look different. Did you lose weight?  Did you get a new farkin user name?


I did. You noticed??? 😳
 
2021-12-06 8:24:59 PM  

saintstryfe: Uncontrolled_Jibe: Look at the main driver of Comorbidities for the present pandemic.   You've been in one pandemic.   Sure, some "healthy" people get really sick, but some people have bad reactions to the vaccines as well.

Obesity drives most of that.   If people would have gotten vaccinated at an acceptable rate, then we'd still have people claiming that losing weight is a long term.   Fad diets don't work, and some people do have metabolic issues, but most overweight people could have lost weight at a few pounds a month and we'd all save money if that happens

A few pounds a month? 3500 calories in a pound of fat. at an absolute minimum you gotta cut 500 calories a day (Though that is only a short-term fix). When you're poor, you can't make easy food subtitutions, and healthy options are hard to come by. Cheap food is loaded  with fillers, sugar and salt that make it satisfying but less good. And because it's satisfying but not satiating, you want more.

There's a lot more then just "Lose a few pounds."

/lost over 300 at one point
//now about 200 pounds, had a bad run of unemployment and depression


https://www.fatsecret.com/calories-nu​t​rition/generic/white-potato-chips?port​ionid=22979&portionamount=1.000

you're halfway there.   You can lose weight (I've kept it off for decades) on any survivable budget.   At some point there will be assistance.  Read the labels.  Tight on money..don't eat what's really two or more portions.
 
2021-12-06 8:33:23 PM  
https://www.fatsecret.com/calories-nu​t​rition/coca-cola/coca-cola-classic-(12​-oz) 140 cal

https://www.fatsecret.com/calories-nu​t​rition/coca-cola/coca-cola-classic-(20​-oz) 240 cal

https://www.fatsecret.com/calories-nu​t​rition/mcdonalds/french-fries-(small)​  220 cal

https://www.fatsecret.com/calories-nu​t​rition/mcdonalds/french-fries-(large)​ 444 cal.

And now you've saved money and maybe lost a few lbs. by the end of the month.

You're probably feeling better and less depressed.

Arguing the exceptions is equivalent to arguing against the vaccine because some exception led to a negative outcome.
 
2021-12-06 10:39:14 PM  

The Crepes of Wrath: BolloxReader: Have you ever been at the corner of The and Hood? Fresh food? What's that? Food deserts are a thing in the US. They aren't in most other countries. The study done in Australia that's always referenced as "refuting" the food desert hypothesis in the US says nothing about the situation in the US and just points to the differences between the two countries.

Yes, and not only do I currently live in one (based on the rural definition), I lived for many years in a food desert based on the urban definition.  You know how many people it impacts (because I took the time to Google that as well)?  About 7% of the US population.  70% of adults range anywhere from overweight to obese to morbidly obese.

Try again.


Ohh good, for a second there I thought that food deserts cause the beetus. That is the non-sequitor you're trying to argue, right?

12.8% of Americans in 2017 were in food desert conditions and 42.4% of American adults were obese in 2017-2018, meaning about 1 in 3 obese people are in food deserts as opposed to your prima fascia ridiculous figures suggesting it was 1 in 10.
 
2021-12-07 9:14:19 AM  
I'm not going to go back and address individual posts that are directed toward me because it's just a waste of time.  Threads about obesity, and the diseases caused by it, are among the most predictable here on Fark, and are really no different than the endless COVID threads we've had for almost two years now.  The site's predominantly US-based participants look at the two topics from a predominantly US-based perspective, blaming the usual suspects.  For COVID, it's the GOP and Fox News.  For obesity, it's the food industry, lack of time, lack of knowledge, lack of money, etc.  And despite the fact that every single excuse given for why the US is so obese can be easily debunked by spending a few minutes with a search engine, Farkers keep offering them up.

Both the pandemic and obesity are global problems.  Blaming the GOP for the former and the typically American excuses for the latter misses the point entirely.  Almost every single country is mishandling the pandemic, and every single country that chooses convenience over health when it comes to food has an obesity problem.  If you look at the global statistics on obesity, they're appalling.  The US isn't even the leader in obesity, we're just the most obvious (at least to Fark's American audience).  And when you drill down into the cause, you find the exact same thing -- people are choosing to be sedentary, and are choosing to eat garbage in the form of processed, ultra-processed, and fast food.  It transcends racial factors, political factors, nation factors, income factors, food availability factors -- every single factor you can think of.

Everyone who makes the convenient choice is getting fatter and opening themselves up to the diseases related to obesity.  Everyone.

If you're overweight/obese and don't want to be, use the resource that's allowing you to look at Fark (that would be the internet, in case it's not obvious) to research healthy eating.  If you're on a budget, add that to your search.  Spend your time cooking something healthy instead of spending your time on Facebook or Instagram, or any of the other social media sites.  Spend your time taking a walk instead of watching TV or a movie.

I've told this story many times, so I'll tell it a final time.  I was diagnosed with cancer 15+ years ago, and I used it as an opportunity to clean up my act, health-wise.  I researched basic, well-established science on healthy eating and exercise, and despite barely getting by pay-to-pay due to an enormous stack of medical bills, I started exercising and eating healthy.  I lost 265 pounds without medical assistance (other than Dr. Google).  And after getting a new doctor this past spring for the first time since I was a teenager (other than the cancer period) and explaining to her how I lost the weight, she complimented me on my "completely science-based approach", and that if everyone did what I did, she'd probably be out of a job.  My blood work came back so perfect, it was shocking to her considering my history of obesity and general poor health.

Good health is largely in everyone's grasp, if they choose it.  Because obesity is a choice, or if you prefer, the result of months or years of poor food choices.
 
2021-12-07 11:25:50 AM  
The Crepes of Wrath:

Because obesity is a choice, or if you prefer, the result of months or years of poor food choices.

This makes perfect sense to me as an alcoholic 6 years into recovery.  I gained about 25 pounds very quickly (well, over about 2 years) after getting sober.  At 200 pounds, that puts my small frame about 50 pounds over ideal.

I find that the same kind of "well, just this time for right now" thinking from my drinking years happens with food choices in my sober present.

With that in mind the last 4 years or so, I've not gained any more weight.  But I've not lost any either.  Some people do, but I feel like I should not use the word "addiction" to describe my weight problem, even though I recognize some of the same mental self-trickery going on as was with drink.
 
2021-12-07 11:45:03 AM  
I'm working hard to lose 5 pounds a month.  By 2026, I should be weightless.
 
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