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(MSN)   Lifting weights for a while but haven't developed more muscles? Here's what you could be doing wrong   (msn.com) divider line
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631 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 06 Dec 2021 at 11:50 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



48 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-12-06 9:32:13 AM  
I have been doing drop sets and seen some results, at least being stronger and all.
 
2021-12-06 10:07:44 AM  
Bro, do you even lift?
 
2021-12-06 10:08:42 AM  
You're female?  A lot tougher to build muscle than guys.
 
2021-12-06 11:23:04 AM  
Eat more food and lift heavier, or increase the intensity of your workouts.

My recommendation is always hire a strength coach. Not a personal trainer, but someone with a college education in exercise science and a strength and conditioning certification.
 
2021-12-06 11:42:44 AM  

kdawg7736: I have been doing drop sets and seen some results, at least being stronger and all.


Pecs or it didn't happen.
 
2021-12-06 11:59:02 AM  
Maybe you just don't have any muscles.
 
2021-12-06 12:01:07 PM  
She's a 68 yo woman, I think that ship has sailed.
 
2021-12-06 12:10:59 PM  
When I was in college (I know, ancient times), I had a roommate for one semester that was a sportsball player.  I learned more about sports and nutrition in that one semester, that has lasted a lifetime, that any crap I have learned on the internet.

Pay someone, who has a college education in exercise science, tell them what you want and follow their regiment.
 
2021-12-06 12:15:32 PM  
building up muscle is stupid. You only need enough to do your physical activity without difficulty. If you want more than that, you want to be TONED not ripped. The reason is simple. Its easier to maintain and it wont turn into a giant blob of fat later in life

And do planking. Every day. 30 to 60 seconds is all you need to burn a hell of a lot of fat and keep your core in shape
 
2021-12-06 12:20:22 PM  
Could it be my diet of Hot Fudge and Marshmellows?
 
2021-12-06 12:22:13 PM  

deadsanta: She's a 68 yo woman, I think that ship has sailed.


I knew a guy at the local gym who was almost 90 and would be there every week. He said that at his age he did it to keep up his ability to do things but he could not really achieve gains, when he tried it just didn't work.

So he was not getting stronger but he was almost 90 and I saw him doing things like driving himself around town buying bags of potting soil for his garden by himself. If I can do that at his age I will be very happy.

/ hope he's doing Ok
 
2021-12-06 12:33:49 PM  

AlgaeRancher: deadsanta: She's a 68 yo woman, I think that ship has sailed.

I knew a guy at the local gym who was almost 90 and would be there every week. He said that at his age he did it to keep up his ability to do things but he could not really achieve gains, when he tried it just didn't work.

So he was not getting stronger but he was almost 90 and I saw him doing things like driving himself around town buying bags of potting soil for his garden by himself. If I can do that at his age I will be very happy.

/ hope he's doing Ok


That's the disconnect between fitness magazines and regular people. Most people kind of want to look good naked but should mainly want to be functional and pain free for as long as possible.
 
2021-12-06 12:36:30 PM  

lifeslammer: building up muscle is stupid. You only need enough to do your physical activity without difficulty. If you want more than that, you want to be TONED not ripped. The reason is simple. Its easier to maintain and it wont turn into a giant blob of fat later in life


Your statement is correct but only within your narrow focus.  I went nuts and worked extensively with two personal trainers, one for balance / flexibility / cardio and one for weight / strength / bodybuilding training.  It worked to the point where both trainers and medical personnel said I had the body of a 45 year old, which was nice because I was 65 at the time.  I got very sick in July and was hospitalized for two weeks.  I lost all my muscle and strength.  If I hadn't had all that when I entered the hospital, we might not be having this conversation.  I look at it building up an extra margin health to battle whatever illness comes my way.  I've managed to build most of it back to have ready for my ongoing health issues (rhymes with dancer).  It's life or death for me, and many others would benefit from this.
 
2021-12-06 12:39:39 PM  

deadsanta: She's a 68 yo woman, I think that ship has sailed.


i.ytimg.comView Full Size


She is 74 years old and started lifting at 71, so not necessarily.
 
2021-12-06 12:41:54 PM  
I do 20 sets of curls every day at the gym.  My arms are huge, bro.
 
2021-12-06 12:43:59 PM  

Rapmaster2000: I do 20 sets of curls every day at the gym.  My arms are huge, bro.


12 or 16 oz?
 
2021-12-06 12:46:30 PM  

bighairyguy: lifeslammer: building up muscle is stupid. You only need enough to do your physical activity without difficulty. If you want more than that, you want to be TONED not ripped. The reason is simple. Its easier to maintain and it wont turn into a giant blob of fat later in life

Your statement is correct but only within your narrow focus.  I went nuts and worked extensively with two personal trainers, one for balance / flexibility / cardio and one for weight / strength / bodybuilding training.  It worked to the point where both trainers and medical personnel said I had the body of a 45 year old, which was nice because I was 65 at the time.  I got very sick in July and was hospitalized for two weeks.  I lost all my muscle and strength.  If I hadn't had all that when I entered the hospital, we might not be having this conversation.  I look at it building up an extra margin health to battle whatever illness comes my way.  I've managed to build most of it back to have ready for my ongoing health issues (rhymes with dancer).  It's life or death for me, and many others would benefit from this.


Good luck,

Your approach is solid.
 
2021-12-06 12:47:03 PM  

deadsanta: She's a 68 yo woman, I think that ship has sailed.


My mom's older than that and never was into physical exertion except maybe for the odd Tai-Chi classes during her post-grad. Last year I convinced her to do water aerobics.
Led her through it. The beauty of water aerobics is that you get as much resistance as you need. That also includes myself while I was guiding her. Move your hand slowly through water, and you barely feel any resistance, push your hand with more force and you get more resistance.
What's even more wonderful is that you don't need to increase weights or even think about that; the stronger you get the faster you'll move your hands/legs the more resistance you'll get.
And darn it, I'll be lying if I said her body didn't respond even at that age, her arms firmed up, waist and hip area lost fat. More importantly than all of that her posture improved and she stopped taking steps one step at a time leading with the same leg and would actually walk down steps instead of dropping onto her leg.
Her mood was much better as the endorphins kicked in and she felt better about herself and more capable.
 
2021-12-06 12:48:11 PM  

Resident Muslim: deadsanta: She's a 68 yo woman, I think that ship has sailed.

My mom's older than that and never was into physical exertion except maybe for the odd Tai-Chi classes during her post-grad. Last year I convinced her to do water aerobics.
Led her through it. The beauty of water aerobics is that you get as much resistance as you need. That also includes myself while I was guiding her. Move your hand slowly through water, and you barely feel any resistance, push your hand with more force and you get more resistance.
What's even more wonderful is that you don't need to increase weights or even think about that; the stronger you get the faster you'll move your hands/legs the more resistance you'll get.
And darn it, I'll be lying if I said her body didn't respond even at that age, her arms firmed up, waist and hip area lost fat. More importantly than all of that her posture improved and she stopped taking steps one step at a time leading with the same leg and would actually walk down steps instead of dropping onto her leg.
Her mood was much better as the endorphins kicked in and she felt better about herself and more capable.


Forgot to add, if the lady in the article is already active, she might have plateaued, and will need to push hard to gain again.
 
2021-12-06 12:50:58 PM  

lonomoholo: She is 74 years old and started lifting at 71, so not necessarily.


Not every one has that 'body type' in their DNA. That turns on Beefcake muscles.
If you don't have the specific genes for bulk...no amount of lifting will bulk you up.
You'll be fit and lean...but not a muscle queen.
 
2021-12-06 12:52:45 PM  

question_dj: Eat more food and lift heavier, or increase the intensity of your workouts.

My recommendation is always hire a strength coach. Not a personal trainer, but someone with a college education in exercise science and a strength and conditioning certification.


The only thing missing from the training pyramid is rest. You need to challenge the body, feed the body and get decent rest (both qualitative and quantitative) for growth.
I cannot stress this enough as I've seen people overtrain and wonder where the results are.
Until they get injured.
:|
 
2021-12-06 1:18:34 PM  

lonomoholo: deadsanta: She's a 68 yo woman, I think that ship has sailed.

[i.ytimg.com image 480x360]

She is 74 years old and started lifting at 71, so not necessarily.


YASSSSSS!
 
2021-12-06 1:34:08 PM  

lifeslammer: building up muscle is stupid. You only need enough to do your physical activity without difficulty. If you want more than that, you want to be TONED not ripped. The reason is simple. Its easier to maintain and it wont turn into a giant blob of fat later in life

And do planking. Every day. 30 to 60 seconds is all you need to burn a hell of a lot of fat and keep your core in shape


Toned/ripped depends almost entirely on lack of body fat and overall body shape.  Larger muscles have a slightly easier time poking out of the fat, but mainly the "point" is to show off larger muscles (or be stronger for some other reason, like sports).

/also be a teen/twenty-something guy.  Nobody else comes close.
 
2021-12-06 1:38:37 PM  
26minutes.jpg
/disappoint
//oblig
 
2021-12-06 1:41:25 PM  
For me? It was pushing heavier weight. Low reps, 3 per set. And once I could do 8 reps per set, I went up in weight again.

/Pulled my fair share of trying to make chickens extinct.
//What worked for me, probably won't for you.
 
2021-12-06 1:45:41 PM  
As far as I understand it, you can't gain muscle and lose fat at the same time unless you're morbidly obese or on steroids. You're either going to lose weight (fat and muscle) or gain weight (fat and muscle.) The amount of weight lifting versus cardio matters in that sense primarily versus how many calories you're taking in.

Long story short, you want big muscles you have to go through bulk and cut cycles in the hopes that when you bulk you add more muscle than fat and when you cut you're cutting more fat than muscle.
 
2021-12-06 1:51:48 PM  

lifeslammer: building up muscle is stupid. You only need enough to do your physical activity without difficulty. If you want more than that, you want to be TONED not ripped. The reason is simple. Its easier to maintain and it wont turn into a giant blob of fat later in life

And do planking. Every day. 30 to 60 seconds is all you need to burn a hell of a lot of fat and keep your core in shape


"Toned" is not a thing.

Muscle does not turn into fat.  Fat does not turn into muscle.

If you want to build muscle, you're going to have to work out AND eat more.  Unless you're in a substantial caloric surplus (or geared up like a bicycle) your body is unlikely to build much muscle.  You'll get fat doing this, but that's why you do a cut cycle later.

Strength, on the other hand, is largely a physiological thing.  There are obviously some limits as to what you can accomplish with a given amount of muscle but a huge component to moving heavy weights is just about teaching your body how to most effectively recruit muscles to do the movement.
 
2021-12-06 1:52:46 PM  

Shaggy_C: Long story short, you want big muscles you have to go through bulk and cut cycles in the hopes that when you bulk you add more muscle than fat and when you cut you're cutting more fat than muscle.


Exactly this.
 
2021-12-06 1:53:56 PM  
I had a recent shoulder injury and haven't been able to workout much while it's healing.  I really feel it as I've lost about 8-10 pounds of weight.  Full disclosure, I'm a mid-50's year old man.

My motivation for doing this is simple. I figure that thanks to our dystopian future I will probably have to keep working until I am at least 70 or more.  The only way I can possibly do that is by being in decent physical shape.
 
2021-12-06 2:01:53 PM  

Close2TheEdge: I had a recent shoulder injury and haven't been able to workout much while it's healing.  I really feel it as I've lost about 8-10 pounds of weight.  Full disclosure, I'm a mid-50's year old man.

My motivation for doing this is simple. I figure that thanks to our dystopian future I will probably have to keep working until I am at least 70 or more.  The only way I can possibly do that is by being in decent physical shape.


It's entirely likely that you lost a substantial amount of weight, but it's mostly water weight. When you're working out on a consistent basis, your body will keep lots of glycogen on hand and every gram of glycogen will bind 4 grams of water.  When you stop working out for a while, that eventually gets flushed away and your weight (and size) will drop.

Once you get back to it, that weight will snap back in relatively short order.  Unless you're pretty malnourished or you've been out of the gym for many months you probably haven't lost more than a negligible amount of dry muscle.
 
2021-12-06 2:29:15 PM  

Shaggy_C: As far as I understand it, you can't gain muscle and lose fat at the same time unless you're morbidly obese or on steroids. You're either going to lose weight (fat and muscle) or gain weight (fat and muscle.) The amount of weight lifting versus cardio matters in that sense primarily versus how many calories you're taking in.

Long story short, you want big muscles you have to go through bulk and cut cycles in the hopes that when you bulk you add more muscle than fat and when you cut you're cutting more fat than muscle.


I am overweight and been lifting three times a week since April. I've been within three pounds of 330 on a 5'9" frame the entire time. I've lifted and stopped on and off for several years.

I set personal records and was capping out on every lift except squats in October. Currently running back up from a deload, because I had to be out of town for a week. I'm 48 and care far more about doing the work every day than hitting specific numbers anyway.

When I lose weight it all comes off the extremities first with belly being the last to go. While not looking obviously toned there's no longer any jiggle on my arms and legs, my torso looks as blubbery as ever. You can feel hard muscle under the fat. My pants are loosening, but I haven't fully gone a size down in pants yet or in button down shirts.

I know, with absolute measurable certainty, my strength (and therefore my muscles mass) has increased, probably on an average of around a pound or so a week.

I make sure I eat about a pound of chicken post workout. Initially I had rice with it to help keep my energy up. As I have improved I switched to mostly broccoli or a spinach salad with my chicken. All I do for the other meals of the day is not be a pig and make sure there's protein in it.

April 1 was 36 weeks ago, which means I've roughly traded 36 pounds of fat for muscle. I was really fat so it's barely showing yet, but you absolutely can do both, especially starting out. The way to do it is to feed the muscle growth and not worry about the scale.

That approach won't take me the whole way to my goal, building and cutting will,  and in my experience the last 10 - 20 lbs (if you're going for magazine cover perfection) are the biggest pain in the ass. Because you have to pay attention to every detail to get that look.
 
2021-12-06 2:32:27 PM  
68 and you're trying to get ripped? GTFO. Good job exercising and stuff, but c'mon man/woman, at that age its less about how toned you can be and more about thanking the stars that you can still lift weights.

/apologies to older farkers
//I'm happy I can still touch my toes
///my workout is carrying unruly children around the house
 
2021-12-06 2:44:45 PM  

OptionC: Close2TheEdge: I had a recent shoulder injury and haven't been able to workout much while it's healing.  I really feel it as I've lost about 8-10 pounds of weight.  Full disclosure, I'm a mid-50's year old man.

My motivation for doing this is simple. I figure that thanks to our dystopian future I will probably have to keep working until I am at least 70 or more.  The only way I can possibly do that is by being in decent physical shape.

It's entirely likely that you lost a substantial amount of weight, but it's mostly water weight. When you're working out on a consistent basis, your body will keep lots of glycogen on hand and every gram of glycogen will bind 4 grams of water.  When you stop working out for a while, that eventually gets flushed away and your weight (and size) will drop.

Once you get back to it, that weight will snap back in relatively short order.  Unless you're pretty malnourished or you've been out of the gym for many months you probably haven't lost more than a negligible amount of dry muscle.


Thanks for the insight.  I confess that I don't know enough about the science of muscle growth beyond the, lift more weight, eat more protein, mantra.

One of these days I will look at engaging a strength trainer, as I know I don't push myself enough during weightlifting sessions.
 
2021-12-06 2:52:10 PM  

Boudyro: April 1 was 36 weeks ago, which means I've roughly traded 36 pounds of fat for muscle. I was really fat so it's barely showing yet, but you absolutely can do both, especially starting out. The way to do it is to feed the muscle growth and not worry about the scale.


Unless your diet is heavy on steroids you're not putting on 1 pound of muscle per week.  At your age, even 1 pound per month of muscle would be an unrealistic goal without gear and you would need to be in a substantial caloric surplus to get anywhere near that.
 
2021-12-06 3:03:18 PM  

lonomoholo: deadsanta: She's a 68 yo woman, I think that ship has sailed.

[i.ytimg.com image 480x360]

She is 74 years old and started lifting at 71, so not necessarily.


Nearly anyone can, yep - but man is it going to be a lot of work in a situation like hers.  A lot of work for anyone, but a lot more for her.  Instant respect for that level of effort - she likely had to work at it about 3X as hard vs. say some 50 year old dude.
 
2021-12-06 3:12:02 PM  
Just got back from the fast food drive-thru.
What's up?
 
2021-12-06 3:46:13 PM  

Boudyro: April 1 was 36 weeks ago, which means I've roughly traded 36 pounds of fat for muscle. I was really fat so it's barely showing yet, but you absolutely can do both, especially starting out.


I did note that it is possible to lose fat and gain muscle at once if you are extremely overweight. 330 on a 5'9" frame would fit the bill I would think (48.7 BMI) - I'm right around 200 on a 6'0" frame (27 BMI, which is 'overweight') which is fat enough that I refuse to go shirtless in public at the moment.

I'm was a 5 day a week runner (doing a 4.5 mile run each day) and switched to lifting (admittedly, P90x) last winter because treadmills were on backorder for months. I did six straight months of weight lifting 3x a week with cardio the other two days and all that it got me was a bigger belly to go along with my bigger biceps. I'd be lying if I thought even half of the weight gain was muscle.

Now, it's cut mode to get back to 180 while running a lot more and lifting moderately. Cycle repeats itself, over and over...
 
2021-12-06 3:48:33 PM  

OptionC: Boudyro: April 1 was 36 weeks ago, which means I've roughly traded 36 pounds of fat for muscle. I was really fat so it's barely showing yet, but you absolutely can do both, especially starting out. The way to do it is to feed the muscle growth and not worry about the scale.

Unless your diet is heavy on steroids you're not putting on 1 pound of muscle per week.  At your age, even 1 pound per month of muscle would be an unrealistic goal without gear and you would need to be in a substantial caloric surplus to get anywhere near that.


Yeah looks like I absorbed a bad number of how much was possible, but the larger point stands. Whatever the amount of muscle I have gained I've lost a corresponding amount of fat. It's noob(ish) gains. Folks who have been consistently at it a while won't work like that.
 
2021-12-06 4:01:04 PM  
Protein within half an hour of working out does wonders. Heck, it can be as little as a yogurt cup.
 
2021-12-06 4:03:16 PM  

Shaggy_C: Boudyro: April 1 was 36 weeks ago, which means I've roughly traded 36 pounds of fat for muscle. I was really fat so it's barely showing yet, but you absolutely can do both, especially starting out.

I did note that it is possible to lose fat and gain muscle at once if you are extremely overweight. 330 on a 5'9" frame would fit the bill I would think (48.7 BMI) - I'm right around 200 on a 6'0" frame (27 BMI, which is 'overweight') which is fat enough that I refuse to go shirtless in public at the moment.

I'm was a 5 day a week runner (doing a 4.5 mile run each day) and switched to lifting (admittedly, P90x) last winter because treadmills were on backorder for months. I did six straight months of weight lifting 3x a week with cardio the other two days and all that it got me was a bigger belly to go along with my bigger biceps. I'd be lying if I thought even half of the weight gain was muscle.

Now, it's cut mode to get back to 180 while running a lot more and lifting moderately. Cycle repeats itself, over and over...


I'm overdue for a proper cut but cutting while minimizing muscle loss means really managing the food, and trying to micro-manage food has become an anxiety trigger for me that could shut the whole works down if I'm not careful.

It'shiat two or three times that way in the past decade. Almost always leading to a total avoidance in October then going for four months to more than a year before I can get myself back to working out.

So far this year I've managed to survive the October crisis and keep at it. Not gonna really try to nip around my trigger situation until at least after the new year.
 
2021-12-06 4:08:11 PM  

Shaggy_C: Boudyro: April 1 was 36 weeks ago, which means I've roughly traded 36 pounds of fat for muscle. I was really fat so it's barely showing yet, but you absolutely can do both, especially starting out.

I did note that it is possible to lose fat and gain muscle at once if you are extremely overweight. 330 on a 5'9" frame would fit the bill I would think (48.7 BMI) - I'm right around 200 on a 6'0" frame (27 BMI, which is 'overweight') which is fat enough that I refuse to go shirtless in public at the moment.

I'm was a 5 day a week runner (doing a 4.5 mile run each day) and switched to lifting (admittedly, P90x) last winter because treadmills were on backorder for months. I did six straight months of weight lifting 3x a week with cardio the other two days and all that it got me was a bigger belly to go along with my bigger biceps. I'd be lying if I thought even half of the weight gain was muscle.

Now, it's cut mode to get back to 180 while running a lot more and lifting moderately. Cycle repeats itself, over and over...


Doesn't that just mean rejigger the diet? I switched from running to lifting awhile back and found that I've lost more weight/kept it off/look far better with lifting than I ever did running. Having muscle to burn calories for me rather than trying to "run off" a meal ended up being a significant, welcome change.
 
2021-12-06 4:09:41 PM  

Nurglitch: Protein within half an hour of working out does wonders. Heck, it can be as little as a yogurt cup.


so does half a can of coke, but no one tells you that :P
 
2021-12-06 4:16:05 PM  

AlgaeRancher: deadsanta: She's a 68 yo woman, I think that ship has sailed.

I knew a guy at the local gym who was almost 90 and would be there every week. He said that at his age he did it to keep up his ability to do things but he could not really achieve gains, when he tried it just didn't work.

So he was not getting stronger but he was almost 90 and I saw him doing things like driving himself around town buying bags of potting soil for his garden by himself. If I can do that at his age I will be very happy.

/ hope he's doing Ok


Good for him!  Hmmm.. I went to Greenridge and there was a 90 year old guy that would work out each week.
He would tell me, "I'm the buffest guy here in my age group."
With him it was the same, it was all about being able to be self sufficient.

You don't have to do a lot to be healthy.
Honest..
30 mins of uninterrupted walking a day reaps amazing benefits.
People that move, survive!  Movimiento es vida!


I can't walk or run, I had a hip replaced.
Was in the gyms until lockdown ~sighs~  then I lost a chunk of weight just from not working out.  
So I bought a bike.
Once you find your pace and your legs understand they have to keep working and moving, it's awesome.
Virtually no impact and you can find your inner kid to see where you can go in your city.

Remember when you were a kid and your bike was how you explored?  That's me during the warm times of 2020 and 2021.
Last year, I rode 824 miles between June and October and climbed about 36,000'
This year I rode 1,838 miles and climbed 108,219 feet
 
2021-12-06 4:21:52 PM  

tdyak: Pay someone, who has a college education in exercise science, tell them what you want and follow their regiment.


media-amazon.comView Full Size


And do it quick. Be fleet.
 
2021-12-06 5:14:03 PM  

darthaegis: AlgaeRancher: deadsanta: She's a 68 yo woman, I think that ship has sailed.

I knew a guy at the local gym who was almost 90 and would be there every week. He said that at his age he did it to keep up his ability to do things but he could not really achieve gains, when he tried it just didn't work.

So he was not getting stronger but he was almost 90 and I saw him doing things like driving himself around town buying bags of potting soil for his garden by himself. If I can do that at his age I will be very happy.

/ hope he's doing Ok

Good for him!  Hmmm.. I went to Greenridge and there was a 90 year old guy that would work out each week.
He would tell me, "I'm the buffest guy here in my age group."
With him it was the same, it was all about being able to be self sufficient.

You don't have to do a lot to be healthy.
Honest..
30 mins of uninterrupted walking a day reaps amazing benefits.
People that move, survive!  Movimiento es vida!


I can't walk or run, I had a hip replaced.
Was in the gyms until lockdown ~sighs~  then I lost a chunk of weight just from not working out.
So I bought a bike.
Once you find your pace and your legs understand they have to keep working and moving, it's awesome.
Virtually no impact and you can find your inner kid to see where you can go in your city.

Remember when you were a kid and your bike was how you explored?  That's me during the warm times of 2020 and 2021.
Last year, I rode 824 miles between June and October and climbed about 36,000'
This year I rode 1,838 miles and climbed 108,219 feet


GOOD WORK. I know exactly what you mean re: feeling like a kid on a bike. Glad you turned it into a great form of exercise.
 
2021-12-06 10:45:28 PM  
Not only is she female, and 68, but how muscular was she when she was a young girl. You can only go against your body type so much
 
2021-12-06 11:19:32 PM  
My warehouse job is fairly physical, lifting heavy things onto shelves. Few are over fifty pounds, but most are at least thirty pounds. I've lost about 20 pounds since the beginning of September, when I cut potato chips from my diet. And beer. Anyway, it's a pretty good upper body workout all day long.

You have to make the most of your situation. Sometimes, you have to trick yourself into thinking to that you're not at work, but at a weird gym where you're getting paid to move heavy things around.
 
2021-12-07 8:09:30 AM  

Spice Must Flow: My warehouse job is fairly physical, lifting heavy things onto shelves. Few are over fifty pounds, but most are at least thirty pounds. I've lost about 20 pounds since the beginning of September, when I cut potato chips from my diet. And beer. Anyway, it's a pretty good upper body workout all day long.

You have to make the most of your situation. Sometimes, you have to trick yourself into thinking to that you're not at work, but at a weird gym where you're getting paid to move heavy things around.


Unfortunately working out and doing labour are two different things with different physical effects on your body. Some overlap, obviously, but a labour job isn't going to get you in shape.
 
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