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(Fark)   Fark Monday Food Discussion: What are your fondest holiday meal memories growing up? Any favorite family dishes you still make? Traditions you still maintain?   (fark.com) divider line
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108 clicks; posted to Food » on 06 Dec 2021 at 9:00 AM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-12-06 6:26:53 AM  
Hopin John me year's day
When they invented crock pots my dad stopped ringing the new year in over the stove
 
2021-12-06 8:57:17 AM  
Cookie pie recipe

3 egg whites
Salt
1 cup sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
13 chocolate wafers
1/3 cup chopped walnuts or pecans

-

3 egg whites beat to soft peaks
Pinch of salt
Gradually beat in 1 cup sugar
Beat to stuff peaks
Add 1 teaspoon vanilla
Fold in about 13 crushed chocolate wafers
1/3 rd cup chopped walnuts

Bake in greased pie plate

325 degrees for 35 minutes

Refrigerate

Serve cold with whipped cream

It makes a pretty thin, flat pie, but oh, so good. Easily my favorite pie of all time.
 
2021-12-06 9:25:07 AM  
My mom made a killer eggnog for the adults and boiled custard for the kids, I've kept both of those traditions. I hand out individual mason jars of eggnog about a week before Christmas and keep plenty of it on hand for Christmas and New Year's parties.

1 pint heavy cream
1 1/4 cups sugar
6 eggs, separated
3/4 cup bourbon
1/3 cup light rum
1 quart milk

Whip egg whites very stiff with 1/2 cup of sugar.
Whip cream stiff with 1/4 cup sugar.
Whip yolks until creamy with the last 1/2 cup of sugar, make sure the sugar fully dissolves.
Add the liquors to the yolk mixture, mix well.
Add milk to the yolk mixture, mix well again.
Fold in the egg whites just until combined.
Fold in the cream just until combined.

Serve with a ladle, it's thick stuff.
 
2021-12-06 10:13:55 AM  
at my Aunt's farm every Christmas morning for the first 18 years of my life:
- scrambled eggs with butter
- bacon
- ham
- biscuits and sausage gravy
- fried potatoes & onions
- fried mushrooms & tomatoes
- hot applesauce

even better: all of the above made scratch from the farm's own products.

I still do the hot chunky applesauce from time to time; and of course I frequently make homefries I'm not entirely some kind of savage heathen. ditto the mushrooms and/or tomatoes. just not that I grown any of it my-ownself :(

/tastes so much better when you grow/raise it yourself
//tastes even better when someone else prepares it for you
///ate this exact breakfast on Saturday morning Sept.18 of this year, yes including all of the meats
 
2021-12-06 10:24:44 AM  
Counting the pies on Thanksgiving at my godparents' house.  Big farm house with probably about 25 people and usually a dozen desserts.

Figgy pudding with hard sauce on Boxing Day.  Unfortunately, the sauce recipe died along with Mrs. L.  Her kids have tried to recreate it but it's just not the same.
 
2021-12-06 11:25:51 AM  
Dad used to make a rack of lamb, with what I recall being a salt/pepper/garlic rub, served with a rosemary au jus/borderline gravy on the side. I haven't had lamb since, and really miss him making it.
 
2021-12-06 11:44:08 AM  
Mom used to do christmas and thanksgiving dinners for 20 people- 2 turkeys, all the trimmings, it took her 3 days to do it, none of us will forget. Time whittles away at people, so we are down to six for family gatherings now. These days sis usually does the turkey and everyone else makes and brings one side along, all drawn from mom's cookbook of family favorites. She's 100 now and not cooking without help anymore, but boy she established a legacy through her kitchen...
 
2021-12-06 12:00:05 PM  
My Scottish-German Dad made the best spaghetti sauce. First, some background: his first job out of college (1952) was as a bookkeeper for the biggest maximum security prison in our state. There was an inmate who also had work duty in the same office so Dad chatted with him. Turns out he was doing life for taking a fellow Italian American out in the sticks and leaving him with a hole in the head.

This inmate's parents ran a very popular Italian restaurant in Milwaukee. Somehow Dad got him to give him his mother's recipe for red sauce. Dad made it once a year and had a big spaghetti dinner. The sauce simmered on the stove all day and was incredible. I still make it.
 
2021-12-06 12:11:34 PM  
My Mom was an excellent but unadventurous cook. Her pot roast was perfection and most meals were pretty basic meat, potatoes, and veggies. She was an incredible baker though and her specialty was pies. She taught me how to make pie crust and I still do it her way. I also follow her recommendation to only use Cortland apples in pie. They aren't overly sweet and hold their shape instead of baking into mush. She also made incredible angel food cakes using her mother's recipe. Grandma made hers without electricity so she whipped the egg whites by hand. Mom's job was to add the sugar by the spoonful as Grandma was whipping. Obviously Mom used a mixer. I have the recipe and make it, but I am not a fan of angel food so I only do it for certain occasions.

Mom's other thing she did better than anyone was her stuffing. It was a classic sage and onion stuffing but was super tasty and she knew exactly the right moisture level for what she was doing with it: stuff a giant turkey, stuff a chicken, make veal birds, or bake it in a separate dish. It was always shredded bread, not cubed.
 
2021-12-06 12:51:41 PM  
My mom's thanksgiving dressing. I was smart enough to watch how she makes it. Her baked beans as well. No recipes, just knowing what to do. Mom is gone but the dishes remain.

/I expect most people feel their mom's dishes are best.
//they are wrong of course
///rules
 
2021-12-06 1:03:10 PM  
I just re-read the subject and realized it was "Holiday" foods. Christmas Eve was a routine. Grandma would come over for supper. Mom made oyster stew and those who didn't like oysters had tomato soup. It was always accompanied with sliced cheese, sausage, and crackers. Even though there was a pudding steaming (for dinner the next day) our dessert was Christmas cookies. After clean-up, we went to the living room and opened the family gifts (Santa gifts were the next morning until he stopped coming, then all gifts were opened Christmas Eve). We would then all go to church and Grandma would go home after church. The rest of us would drive around town to look at Christmas lights.

My Christmas Eve meal still is things like cheese and sausage and special sweets. I hate oysters so that part of the tradition is gone. I also still make the steamed pudding with hard sauce for Christmas Day from my Mom's recipes.
 
2021-12-06 1:08:04 PM  

softshoes: My mom's thanksgiving dressing. I was smart enough to watch how she makes it. Her baked beans as well. No recipes, just knowing what to do. Mom is gone but the dishes remain.

/I expect most people feel their mom's dishes are best.
//they are wrong of course
///rules


Cooking and baking is something kids pick up almost by osmosis. Hanging around underfoot, then helping with simple tasks, then helping a lot, and finally doing it yourself. That is how I learned to make pies. I needed to actually ask Mom to show me how she makes her stuffing since she had the turkey stuffed and in the oven long before I woke up in the morning so the only hands-on experience I got was breaking up the bread the night before.
 
2021-12-06 1:25:47 PM  

catmandu: My Mom was an excellent but unadventurous cook. Her pot roast was perfection and most meals were pretty basic meat, potatoes, and veggies. She was an incredible baker though and her specialty was pies. She taught me how to make pie crust and I still do it her way. I also follow her recommendation to only use Cortland apples in pie. They aren't overly sweet and hold their shape instead of baking into mush. She also made incredible angel food cakes using her mother's recipe. Grandma made hers without electricity so she whipped the egg whites by hand. Mom's job was to add the sugar by the spoonful as Grandma was whipping. Obviously Mom used a mixer. I have the recipe and make it, but I am not a fan of angel food so I only do it for certain occasions.

Mom's other thing she did better than anyone was her stuffing. It was a classic sage and onion stuffing but was super tasty and she knew exactly the right moisture level for what she was doing with it: stuff a giant turkey, stuff a chicken, make veal birds, or bake it in a separate dish. It was always shredded bread, not cubed.


Out of curiosity does her pie crust use lard?
 
2021-12-06 1:33:15 PM  

That Reilly Monster: My mom made a killer eggnog for the adults and boiled custard for the kids, I've kept both of those traditions. I hand out individual mason jars of eggnog about a week before Christmas and keep plenty of it on hand for Christmas and New Year's parties.

1 pint heavy cream
1 1/4 cups sugar
6 eggs, separated
3/4 cup bourbon
1/3 cup light rum
1 quart milk

Whip egg whites very stiff with 1/2 cup of sugar.
Whip cream stiff with 1/4 cup sugar.
Whip yolks until creamy with the last 1/2 cup of sugar, make sure the sugar fully dissolves.
Add the liquors to the yolk mixture, mix well.
Add milk to the yolk mixture, mix well again.
Fold in the egg whites just until combined.
Fold in the cream just until combined.

Serve with a ladle, it's thick stuff.


I think your mom is my spirit animal

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Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-12-06 1:58:05 PM  
My Bohemian/German grandmother would always make a pork roast and bread dumplings. We have the recipe but can never get the dumplings right. The flavor is OK but they're always too dense. She's been gone for 15 years and I miss them. Found a Bohemian restaurant that comes close, but not quite right.

She also made kolaches, the round style, not the folded over version. She would make cherry, apricot and strawberry for everyone else, but she would make a batch of prune and a batch of poppy seed for the two of us. Have that recipe also but I just can't do it justice. Some Polish bakeries get it pretty close.

I miss her cooking so much.
 
2021-12-06 2:10:00 PM  
My mom makes cinnamon buns for breakfast every Christmas morning. Unfortunately, because my dad is diabetic, over the years they've evolved into a low-carb sugar-free abomination. I keep suggesting that they let me make a frittata instead, but apparently the cinnamon bun tradition is very very important. Hellifiknow.
 
2021-12-06 2:11:16 PM  
My mom could not cook to save her life. During pando I found her book of recipes that she used, and its not surprising that she was unable to cook well........savory dishes without seasonings, baking recipes without leavening agents, and my personal favorite: a fig cake recipe without any figs in it.
 
2021-12-06 2:18:24 PM  
mom's Kiss Cookies - sugar cookies baked with a hershey's kiss in them. Absolute favorites.
 
2021-12-06 2:32:41 PM  
Ehhh turkey, mashed potatoes, dinner rolls ham and beans, chicken n dumplings ala cream of chicken.

Only thing I really miss is the ham and beans.

I don't make mashed like my folks do, but my mom wasn't the best cook.

So yeah... none of that carried over for the holidays.
 
2021-12-06 3:03:19 PM  

softshoes: My mom's thanksgiving dressing. I was smart enough to watch how she makes it. Her baked beans as well. No recipes, just knowing what to do. Mom is gone but the dishes remain.

/I expect most people feel their mom's dishes are best.
//they are wrong of course
///rules


Mine is exactly this. My mom's dressing. When mom was sick at the end of her life, she made it a point to teach it to my wife and I. So it gets made every Thanksgiving and it's really special to me
 
2021-12-06 3:08:04 PM  

Slypork: My Bohemian/German grandmother would always make a pork roast and bread dumplings. We have the recipe but can never get the dumplings right. The flavor is OK but they're always too dense. She's been gone for 15 years and I miss them. Found a Bohemian restaurant that comes close, but not quite right.

She also made kolaches, the round style, not the folded over version. She would make cherry, apricot and strawberry for everyone else, but she would make a batch of prune and a batch of poppy seed for the two of us. Have that recipe also but I just can't do it justice. Some Polish bakeries get it pretty close.

I miss her cooking so much.


My SIL used to make her Bohemian grandmother's bread dumplings to go with liver dumpling soup. She found frozen ones at the local Piggly Wiggly that were just as good as home made.
 
2021-12-06 3:10:03 PM  

That Reilly Monster: catmandu: My Mom was an excellent but unadventurous cook. Her pot roast was perfection and most meals were pretty basic meat, potatoes, and veggies. She was an incredible baker though and her specialty was pies. She taught me how to make pie crust and I still do it her way. I also follow her recommendation to only use Cortland apples in pie. They aren't overly sweet and hold their shape instead of baking into mush. She also made incredible angel food cakes using her mother's recipe. Grandma made hers without electricity so she whipped the egg whites by hand. Mom's job was to add the sugar by the spoonful as Grandma was whipping. Obviously Mom used a mixer. I have the recipe and make it, but I am not a fan of angel food so I only do it for certain occasions.

Mom's other thing she did better than anyone was her stuffing. It was a classic sage and onion stuffing but was super tasty and she knew exactly the right moisture level for what she was doing with it: stuff a giant turkey, stuff a chicken, make veal birds, or bake it in a separate dish. It was always shredded bread, not cubed.

Out of curiosity does her pie crust use lard?


No. She always felt that lard made the crust too dense. She used Fluffo until they went out of business in the 70's and started using butter flavor Crisco instead.
 
2021-12-06 3:12:18 PM  
I always somewhat questioned my mom's insistence on making tourtierre - a big rustic pot pie with pork, leeks, and all the usual suspect veggies - for Christmas, since pork pie doesn't seem all that celebratory to me the way a turkey or ham or fancy cut of meat does. But it's the one time a year she breaks out her mom's pie crust recipe rather than relying on Pillsbury, and she insists the pie represents Heritage and Tradition, and I never argued much. I think. I probably argued some, I was a kid, it was my job.

But then last year came around and we had Christmas on the patio gathered not-too-close around a little fire pit, and boy let me tell you that pork pie was the perfect thing to scoop into big soup mugs and all wrap our gloved hands around and try not to drop on our scarves as it went from scalding hot to lukewarm in the time it took to raise a forkful. Now I know for sure this is a tradition I'll uphold even if another generation takes its turn complaining.

I'm lucky that it's mostly my parents' generation still doing the tradition-maintaining at this point. Maybe this will be the year I learn all my grandmother's Christmas cookies from my aunt. Or my fiance's grandmother's Christmas cookies from his dad. Kolaches figure heavily into their holiday traditions.
 
2021-12-06 3:19:21 PM  
We've always had what we call filling at Thanksgiving.  It's a Pennsylvania Dutch inspired bread and potato dish with onions and celery with the dried bread soaked in chicken stock and then all smashed together and baked.

Then of course crappy green bean casserole, cranberry jelly from a can, and the abomination that is creamed corn.

Then at Christmas we would have a seafood feast the night before with steamed shrimp and lobster and clams with what seemed like gallons of melted butter.  On Christmas Day it was baked ham with kielbasa and lots of red horseradish.

My Dad was in the family business which was an old time, standup bar, women allowed only in the side room kind of place.  The side room had about ten tables where you could get a bite to eat or sit and have a beer if you were a woman.  So we got all of our food wholesale and we ate well.  My father was a fan of liverwurst and pigs feet jelly and after the aforementioned Christmas Eve seafood feast would drink all of the leftover melted butter.  He's 90 now, and believe it or not is in pretty good shape for a man that ate poorly for the bulk of his adult life.
 
2021-12-06 3:30:13 PM  

Anoria: I always somewhat questioned my mom's insistence on making tourtierre - a big rustic pot pie with pork, leeks, and all the usual suspect veggies - for Christmas, since pork pie doesn't seem all that celebratory to me the way a turkey or ham or fancy cut of meat does. But it's the one time a year she breaks out her mom's pie crust recipe rather than relying on Pillsbury, and she insists the pie represents Heritage and Tradition, and I never argued much. I think. I probably argued some, I was a kid, it was my job.

But then last year came around and we had Christmas on the patio gathered not-too-close around a little fire pit, and boy let me tell you that pork pie was the perfect thing to scoop into big soup mugs and all wrap our gloved hands around and try not to drop on our scarves as it went from scalding hot to lukewarm in the time it took to raise a forkful. Now I know for sure this is a tradition I'll uphold even if another generation takes its turn complaining.

I'm lucky that it's mostly my parents' generation still doing the tradition-maintaining at this point. Maybe this will be the year I learn all my grandmother's Christmas cookies from my aunt. Or my fiance's grandmother's Christmas cookies from his dad. Kolaches figure heavily into their holiday traditions.


I made a Tourtiere for the first time last Christmas Eve. It was quite the hit.
 
2021-12-06 3:38:22 PM  
Fondest memory was sitting on an unabridged dictionary so I could sit at the big table next to Grandpa.
 
2021-12-06 3:55:25 PM  
Escarole soup was the tradition - it's commonly called Italian Wedding Soup. But without the sausage, that makes the broth a bit too greasy and the fennel for some reason overpowers the flavor. Used to hate it as a kid, now I can't get enough of it.

My mom had a recipe for an Italian cookie that everyone loves. It had a funny shape and a funny name, that without icing looks like a spiral (or a turd if you want to be mean). Iced they look good, and everyone loves them. Not too sweet, just perfectly moist and great with coffee or hot cocoa. The only problem with it, is forming the cookie itself, as you have to twirl it around your finger in such a way. Too tight and it looks like a spring, too loose and it unwraps while baking. I have yet to master the shape, and I swear to whichever deity that I would love to get one of hers and preserve it in epoxy. Also, when taken by a maudlin mood, I wish I could have one hour with her baking these cookies and talking to her, but I think everyone has the same thoughts.
 
2021-12-06 4:23:03 PM  
oh that reminds me! pizelle were always a huge xmas tradition. zfc why in a Ukrainian family, and it wasn't even for trubochki just the normal flat kind - my mother had an electric iron for making them by the hundreds every year. aniseed only, gtfo with your vanilla crap.

also those basic sugar cutout cookies with milk/powdered-sugar icing, somehow the combination becomes transformative.

our unheated foyer was basicamente nothing more than storage space for tub after tub of cookies. (no-one in rural Ohio uses front doors, it's way too fancy)
 
2021-12-06 4:40:00 PM  

Tor_Eckman: We've always had what we call filling at Thanksgiving.  It's a Pennsylvania Dutch inspired bread and potato dish with onions and celery with the dried bread soaked in chicken stock and then all smashed together and baked.

Then of course crappy green bean casserole, cranberry jelly from a can, and the abomination that is creamed corn.

Then at Christmas we would have a seafood feast the night before with steamed shrimp and lobster and clams with what seemed like gallons of melted butter.  On Christmas Day it was baked ham with kielbasa and lots of red horseradish.

My Dad was in the family business which was an old time, standup bar, women allowed only in the side room kind of place.  The side room had about ten tables where you could get a bite to eat or sit and have a beer if you were a woman.  So we got all of our food wholesale and we ate well.  My father was a fan of liverwurst and pigs feet jelly and after the aforementioned Christmas Eve seafood feast would drink all of the leftover melted butter.  He's 90 now, and believe it or not is in pretty good shape for a man that ate poorly for the bulk of his adult life.


Yet, inexplicably, if you freeze blobs of the stuff, then batter and deep fry them, the result is exquisitely filthy.
 
2021-12-06 4:51:07 PM  
Come New Years Day I fully expect the pork & sauerkraut with mashed potatoes on the side. Whether it's a small pork shoulder or thick chops or country ribs, it really doesn't matter so much. Low and slow in the sauerkraut until the bones slide clean off and with a good dollop of applesauce to accompany the meal.

Some years we were broker than others and it would be hot dogs & sauerkraut. With hot dogs you don't need as much applesauce.
 
2021-12-06 5:20:03 PM  

tintar: oh that reminds me! pizelle were always a huge xmas tradition. zfc why in a Ukrainian family, and it wasn't even for trubochki just the normal flat kind - my mother had an electric iron for making them by the hundreds every year. aniseed only, gtfo with your vanilla crap.

also those basic sugar cutout cookies with milk/powdered-sugar icing, somehow the combination becomes transformative.

our unheated foyer was basicamente nothing more than storage space for tub after tub of cookies. (no-one in rural Ohio uses front doors, it's way too fancy)


Yes! Pizelles were part of the cookie holy menagerie. Pizelles, ewans (angel wings, a kind of fried light crisy cookie), those cookies I mentioned, nutrolls, and strouffles/beebees (fried half-inch dough beads covered with honey and nonpareils), and occasionally nutballs and Hungarian cookies. If we wanted to be extravagant, cream puffs filled with custard. Damn, I want to do some baking now.
 
2021-12-06 5:38:54 PM  
Holiday meals were bland in my family before I took over the lion's share of cooking. Overdone tasteless turkey, skim milk mashed potatoes, "gravy" that was nothing more than cornstarch whisked into boiling canned stock.

Once I took over, reservations at our Thanksgiving became so much of a hit that 2019 had TWO Thanksgivings. Both with fights over who got the last of the stuffing. We likely would've continued that practice if 'rona hadn't come to town.
 
2021-12-06 6:28:11 PM  
I'm the oldest of 4 with a gap of 10 years between me and the youngest.  Although not a holiday for the kids, my mom would make fresh baked homemade cinnamon rolls for the first day of school each year.  They were the most delicate fluffy light pillowy morsels of goodness I've ever had.  I've got the recipe and can make them correctly about 50% of the time.  I struggle with the proofing.  Anyway, I'm done with schooling and don't have kids but I still make them at least once a year in winter for a sweet treat breakfast in a cold day off.
 
2021-12-06 7:57:41 PM  
Holiday meals... they varied. Favorite family dishes, sure. Traditions, absolutely!
This should cover one of my favorites. Just don't ask for a recipe for mashed potatoes, or else...

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Oh, the "5 cups water" in the red cabbage recipe is WAY too much. I followed it blindly once and wound up with red cabbage soup. Start with 1-2 cups, please... you can always add more.
And no more than 1/4 cup vinegar, someone was drinking when this was written down...

And use beef broth instead of water in the rouladen recipe. Also, some thyme is needed, marjoram is nice, and pepper. I use bruised green peppercorns and a bay leaf and make a bit of a gravy out of it. And a bit of the red wine you use for the cabbage... and...
Fark it, just give me the address, I'll have to come by and make it myself.
 
2021-12-06 8:21:29 PM  

Duck_of_Doom: tintar: oh that reminds me! pizelle were always a huge xmas tradition. zfc why in a Ukrainian family, and it wasn't even for trubochki just the normal flat kind - my mother had an electric iron for making them by the hundreds every year. aniseed only, gtfo with your vanilla crap.

also those basic sugar cutout cookies with milk/powdered-sugar icing, somehow the combination becomes transformative.

our unheated foyer was basicamente nothing more than storage space for tub after tub of cookies. (no-one in rural Ohio uses front doors, it's way too fancy)

Yes! Pizelles were part of the cookie holy menagerie. Pizelles, ewans (angel wings, a kind of fried light crisy cookie), those cookies I mentioned, nutrolls, and strouffles/beebees (fried half-inch dough beads covered with honey and nonpareils), and occasionally nutballs and Hungarian cookies. If we wanted to be extravagant, cream puffs filled with custard. Damn, I want to do some baking now.


Now as far as Mrs Spldng is concerned, the proper timing of cooking a pizzelle is to say the first half of the "Hail Mary" while you're holding the pizzelle iron over the gas burner and the flipping the iron and finishing the prayer. At least that's  what she was taught.
 
2021-12-06 8:33:24 PM  
And in terms of the REAL high holidays, the most sacred time in young Spldng's life was the first Monday after Thanksgiving; the first day of deer season. Should anyone in the family have success in the field, Dad should prepare fresh liver & onions. Unless there was bullet damage and then we would have sauteed heart with homefries.
Don't judge me. I grew up in the woods.
 
2021-12-06 9:26:28 PM  
My grandmother's homemade dinner rolls. I could eat those all day, and frequently did. I have made them a few times. Still working on getting it right.
 
2021-12-07 2:36:07 AM  
I don't know that the offical name was - I just called it that Jello Stuff.  It was red jello, fruit cocktail, cool whip and wallnuts.  It wasn't fancy or complicated - but it was delicious and one of the many things I miss because of her passing.
 
2021-12-07 7:43:39 AM  

catmandu: My Scottish-German Dad made the best spaghetti sauce. First, some background: his first job out of college (1952) was as a bookkeeper for the biggest maximum security prison in our state. There was an inmate who also had work duty in the same office so Dad chatted with him. Turns out he was doing life for taking a fellow Italian American out in the sticks and leaving him with a hole in the head.

This inmate's parents ran a very popular Italian restaurant in Milwaukee. Somehow Dad got him to give him his mother's recipe for red sauce. Dad made it once a year and had a big spaghetti dinner. The sauce simmered on the stove all day and was incredible. I still make it.


So the human sacrifice is not actually a required step in the recipe, correct?
 
2021-12-07 8:10:10 AM  

dryknife: catmandu: My Scottish-German Dad made the best spaghetti sauce. First, some background: his first job out of college (1952) was as a bookkeeper for the biggest maximum security prison in our state. There was an inmate who also had work duty in the same office so Dad chatted with him. Turns out he was doing life for taking a fellow Italian American out in the sticks and leaving him with a hole in the head.

This inmate's parents ran a very popular Italian restaurant in Milwaukee. Somehow Dad got him to give him his mother's recipe for red sauce. Dad made it once a year and had a big spaghetti dinner. The sauce simmered on the stove all day and was incredible. I still make it.

So the human sacrifice is not actually a required step in the recipe, correct?


see, you say that, but
 
2021-12-07 8:31:24 AM  

tintar: dryknife: catmandu: My Scottish-German Dad made the best spaghetti sauce. First, some background: his first job out of college (1952) was as a bookkeeper for the biggest maximum security prison in our state. There was an inmate who also had work duty in the same office so Dad chatted with him. Turns out he was doing life for taking a fellow Italian American out in the sticks and leaving him with a hole in the head.

This inmate's parents ran a very popular Italian restaurant in Milwaukee. Somehow Dad got him to give him his mother's recipe for red sauce. Dad made it once a year and had a big spaghetti dinner. The sauce simmered on the stove all day and was incredible. I still make it.

So the human sacrifice is not actually a required step in the recipe, correct?

see, you say that, but


"Finish your plate, son. I killed a man to feed you this spaghetti..."
 
2021-12-07 9:55:19 AM  

dryknife: catmandu: My Scottish-German Dad made the best spaghetti sauce. First, some background: his first job out of college (1952) was as a bookkeeper for the biggest maximum security prison in our state. There was an inmate who also had work duty in the same office so Dad chatted with him. Turns out he was doing life for taking a fellow Italian American out in the sticks and leaving him with a hole in the head.

This inmate's parents ran a very popular Italian restaurant in Milwaukee. Somehow Dad got him to give him his mother's recipe for red sauce. Dad made it once a year and had a big spaghetti dinner. The sauce simmered on the stove all day and was incredible. I still make it.

So the human sacrifice is not actually a required step in the recipe, correct?


If it was, Louie either forgot to mention it or Dad never wrote it down.
 
2021-12-07 2:22:45 PM  

catmandu: dryknife: catmandu: My Scottish-German Dad made the best spaghetti sauce. First, some background: his first job out of college (1952) was as a bookkeeper for the biggest maximum security prison in our state. There was an inmate who also had work duty in the same office so Dad chatted with him. Turns out he was doing life for taking a fellow Italian American out in the sticks and leaving him with a hole in the head.

This inmate's parents ran a very popular Italian restaurant in Milwaukee. Somehow Dad got him to give him his mother's recipe for red sauce. Dad made it once a year and had a big spaghetti dinner. The sauce simmered on the stove all day and was incredible. I still make it.

So the human sacrifice is not actually a required step in the recipe, correct?

If it was, Louie either forgot to mention it or Dad never wrote it down.


You're not going to share the recipe, are you?
 
2021-12-07 2:56:17 PM  

dryknife: catmandu: dryknife: catmandu: My Scottish-German Dad made the best spaghetti sauce. First, some background: his first job out of college (1952) was as a bookkeeper for the biggest maximum security prison in our state. There was an inmate who also had work duty in the same office so Dad chatted with him. Turns out he was doing life for taking a fellow Italian American out in the sticks and leaving him with a hole in the head.

This inmate's parents ran a very popular Italian restaurant in Milwaukee. Somehow Dad got him to give him his mother's recipe for red sauce. Dad made it once a year and had a big spaghetti dinner. The sauce simmered on the stove all day and was incredible. I still make it.

So the human sacrifice is not actually a required step in the recipe, correct?

If it was, Louie either forgot to mention it or Dad never wrote it down.

You're not going to share the recipe, are you?


She would, but then she'd have to meet you out in BFE before making another big batch of spaghetti.
 
2021-12-07 11:14:49 PM  

catmandu: My Scottish-German Dad made the best spaghetti sauce. First, some background: his first job out of college (1952) was as a bookkeeper for the biggest maximum security prison in our state. There was an inmate who also had work duty in the same office so Dad chatted with him. Turns out he was doing life for taking a fellow Italian American out in the sticks and leaving him with a hole in the head.

This inmate's parents ran a very popular Italian restaurant in Milwaukee. Somehow Dad got him to give him his mother's recipe for red sauce. Dad made it once a year and had a big spaghetti dinner. The sauce simmered on the stove all day and was incredible. I still make it.


But did he take the cannoli?

Anyhow, christmas at grandma's was always ham, lefse, various other non revolting Scandinavian treats, and at least three dozen varieties of cookies.
 
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