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(The Takeout)   So what the hell is a sugarplum anyway, and why is it supposed to be dancing in our heads?   (thetakeout.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Confectionery, Medicinal plants, Fennel, Plum, Sugar, Apiaceae, Candy historians, Spice  
•       •       •

986 clicks; posted to Food » on 05 Dec 2021 at 11:00 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



37 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-12-05 9:35:39 AM  
Fentanyl.
 
2021-12-05 10:12:27 AM  
Sugar plums are not the subject of the clause. Visions is the subject.  Which is even weirder now that I think about it.
 
2021-12-05 11:02:13 AM  
memegenerator.netView Full Size
 
2021-12-05 11:03:28 AM  
memegenerator.netView Full Size
 
2021-12-05 11:04:04 AM  
y.yarn.coView Full Size
 
2021-12-05 11:04:44 AM  
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2021-12-05 11:04:59 AM  
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2021-12-05 11:06:20 AM  
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2021-12-05 11:13:04 AM  
Cordyceps.
 
2021-12-05 11:35:30 AM  
Sugar plums are muisjes?

Those are foul. You see a bunch of what's obviously candy on your bread, and you bite in hoping it's something delicious like hagelslag, only to find it tastes like licorice.

At least drop are obvious what they are

The real lesson is: do not accept candy from the Dutch.  Baked goods yes (like suikerbrood), but not if it has candy on top of it.  It might be fruity hagelslag, but it might be muisjes.

/does not like black licorice
 
2021-12-05 12:02:24 PM  
A sugarplum is a form of candy called a comfit (not to be confused with confit; why is this getting worse?). A comfit is like a seed, nut, or bit of spice coated with a layer of hard sugar.

so jordan almonds are modern sugar plums? that's easy enough to understand. not my favorite for eating, but my maternal g-ma loved them. and i don't find the absence of actual dried plums to be quite the shocking betrayal our poor author does:

There's not even a single plum within a mile of a sugarplum. If I sound riled up, it's because I am. I had no idea.

ok. the takeout/lifehacker, simmer down now. moving on....
 
2021-12-05 12:10:09 PM  

Oneiros: Sugar plums are muisjes?

Those are foul. You see a bunch of what's obviously candy on your bread, and you bite in hoping it's something delicious like hagelslag, only to find it tastes like licorice.

At least drop are obvious what they are

The real lesson is: do not accept candy from the Dutch.  Baked goods yes (like suikerbrood), but not if it has candy on top of it.  It might be fruity hagelslag, but it might be muisjes.

/does not like black licorice


It boggles my mind that there are so many licorice-like things in the world, considering how much of the population seems to hate them. You have regular licorice and salmiak, but then also fennel and star anise and then anisette, arak, pastis, ouzo, sambuca, absinthe ... why?
 
2021-12-05 12:24:53 PM  
Plums alone suck. Imagine what sugar plums are like.
 
2021-12-05 12:24:55 PM  

austerity101: Oneiros: Sugar plums are muisjes?

Those are foul. You see a bunch of what's obviously candy on your bread, and you bite in hoping it's something delicious like hagelslag, only to find it tastes like licorice.

At least drop are obvious what they are

The real lesson is: do not accept candy from the Dutch.  Baked goods yes (like suikerbrood), but not if it has candy on top of it.  It might be fruity hagelslag, but it might be muisjes.

/does not like black licorice

It boggles my mind that there are so many licorice-like things in the world, considering how much of the population seems to hate them. You have regular licorice and salmiak, but then also fennel and star anise and then anisette, arak, pastis, ouzo, sambuca, absinthe ... why?


I suspect not liking licorice is more of a modern thing, go back even a couple of generations and I suspect it was way more popular.  As why it is in booze?  It is a strong flavor that would cover up any imperfections in distillation most likely and if people liked it at the time why not?   I personally don't mind the flavor of licorice (bought some fennel yesterday in fact)  but not every product using it, salted licorice is something you have to grow up on to truly appreciate.
 
2021-12-05 12:42:26 PM  

Oneiros: Sugar plums are muisjes?


You are confusing anise with licorice. Real licorice contains  glycyrrhizin, which gives it a weird sweetness that many find enjoyable.

For real licorice real sugar real plums I somewhat recommend Chinese preserved plums, Li hing mui 旅行梅. which contain sugar, licorice, and salt, and often look like:

Fark user imageView Full Size


Years back at some local Chinese store I found a variant that was less salty and less desiccated that I prefer - it was more like prune flesh, but since then I've been unable to figure out how to ask for them by name.
 
2021-12-05 12:43:37 PM  

cSquids: austerity101: Oneiros: Sugar plums are muisjes?

Those are foul. You see a bunch of what's obviously candy on your bread, and you bite in hoping it's something delicious like hagelslag, only to find it tastes like licorice.

At least drop are obvious what they are

The real lesson is: do not accept candy from the Dutch.  Baked goods yes (like suikerbrood), but not if it has candy on top of it.  It might be fruity hagelslag, but it might be muisjes.

/does not like black licorice

It boggles my mind that there are so many licorice-like things in the world, considering how much of the population seems to hate them. You have regular licorice and salmiak, but then also fennel and star anise and then anisette, arak, pastis, ouzo, sambuca, absinthe ... why?

I suspect not liking licorice is more of a modern thing, go back even a couple of generations and I suspect it was way more popular.  As why it is in booze?  It is a strong flavor that would cover up any imperfections in distillation most likely and if people liked it at the time why not?   I personally don't mind the flavor of licorice (bought some fennel yesterday in fact)  but not every product using it, salted licorice is something you have to grow up on to truly appreciate.


and if you didn't grow up on salt licorice, it will be the thing you get dared to eat the first time you encounter it.

my first day working in an old fashioned candy shop i was dared to eat a piece of dubbelzoute, so i did.

and i exclaimed "my god! it's like drinking a dirty martini made with sambuca while standing in the middle of the ocean with your mouth wide open to the waves!" it was so intense it was like a spiritual shock, nearly an out-of-body experience. good times, good times!
 
2021-12-05 12:52:55 PM  

luna1580: cSquids: austerity101: Oneiros: Sugar plums are muisjes?

Those are foul. You see a bunch of what's obviously candy on your bread, and you bite in hoping it's something delicious like hagelslag, only to find it tastes like licorice.

At least drop are obvious what they are

The real lesson is: do not accept candy from the Dutch.  Baked goods yes (like suikerbrood), but not if it has candy on top of it.  It might be fruity hagelslag, but it might be muisjes.

/does not like black licorice

It boggles my mind that there are so many licorice-like things in the world, considering how much of the population seems to hate them. You have regular licorice and salmiak, but then also fennel and star anise and then anisette, arak, pastis, ouzo, sambuca, absinthe ... why?

I suspect not liking licorice is more of a modern thing, go back even a couple of generations and I suspect it was way more popular.  As why it is in booze?  It is a strong flavor that would cover up any imperfections in distillation most likely and if people liked it at the time why not?   I personally don't mind the flavor of licorice (bought some fennel yesterday in fact)  but not every product using it, salted licorice is something you have to grow up on to truly appreciate.

and if you didn't grow up on salt licorice, it will be the thing you get dared to eat the first time you encounter it.

my first day working in an old fashioned candy shop i was dared to eat a piece of dubbelzoute, so i did.

and i exclaimed "my god! it's like drinking a dirty martini made with sambuca while standing in the middle of the ocean with your mouth wide open to the waves!" it was so intense it was like a spiritual shock, nearly an out-of-body experience. good times, good times!


I have Scandinavian people bring some as gifts and others try to get me try it in Scandinavian countries, I think as a joke.  They are fully aware how niche of a product it is in other countries.  I enjoyed the aquavit, also full of licorice flavors though!
 
2021-12-05 12:57:23 PM  

austerity101: It boggles my mind that there are so many licorice-like things in the world, considering how much of the population seems to hate them. You have regular licorice and salmiak, but then also fennel and star anise and then anisette, arak, pastis, ouzo, sambuca, absinthe ... why?


I used to have a favorite herb (which I will not name for people's continued enjoyment of it)

One day, my mom said she likes it because it tastes like licorice.  And it doesn't until you have large quantities of it.  And you kinda have to search for it on the most popular western varieties of it, but it's there in the background.  (There are some Asian varieties where it's more pronounced)

She totally ruined that herb for me.  Not to cilantro levels, luckily-- I still use it, but I don't go crazy with it anymore.

... but for your question, I suspect some of it might be medicinal.  Fennel has some anti-microbial compounds in it, so I suspect that's why it's used in Italian sausage so much.

Or maybe it was like when I'd order mushrooms on pizza as a kid.  After many years, I could finally tolerate them, but my brother hadn't, so it was a way to make sure he didn't just eat all of the leftovers after school, as he got home earlier than I did.

So it's like the natural 'Mr Yuck' of the plant world, but some people have evolved to tolerate it
 
2021-12-05 1:52:04 PM  

luna1580: and if you didn't grow up on salt licorice, it will be the thing you get dared to eat the first time you encounter it.


Used to work with a dude that was over from Japan on a work visa, one of the things he loved like crazy was Dubbelzoute.  Apparently discovered it in a random imports place in Japan and fell in love with it, at the age of 31.  He was all worried when he came to the U.S. that he would have a hard time finding it.  (We were near L.A. so no it was easy enough, but how would he know that ahead of time so fair enough concern.)  I tried one, once.  That was more than enough.  That thing made me sinuses hurt - and not in any figurative sense.  I'm also pretty sure my lymph nodes attempted to rise up and strangle me, it was hard to tell with my tongue shriveling into dust at the time
 
2021-12-05 2:05:47 PM  

Oneiros: austerity101: It boggles my mind that there are so many licorice-like things in the world, considering how much of the population seems to hate them. You have regular licorice and salmiak, but then also fennel and star anise and then anisette, arak, pastis, ouzo, sambuca, absinthe ... why?

I used to have a favorite herb (which I will not name for people's continued enjoyment of it)

One day, my mom said she likes it because it tastes like licorice.  And it doesn't until you have large quantities of it.  And you kinda have to search for it on the most popular western varieties of it, but it's there in the background.  (There are some Asian varieties where it's more pronounced)

She totally ruined that herb for me.  Not to cilantro levels, luckily-- I still use it, but I don't go crazy with it anymore.

... but for your question, I suspect some of it might be medicinal.  Fennel has some anti-microbial compounds in it, so I suspect that's why it's used in Italian sausage so much.

Or maybe it was like when I'd order mushrooms on pizza as a kid.  After many years, I could finally tolerate them, but my brother hadn't, so it was a way to make sure he didn't just eat all of the leftovers after school, as he got home earlier than I did.

So it's like the natural 'Mr Yuck' of the plant world, but some people have evolved to tolerate it


if you grow basil you know this. when asking questions like "but how is the flavor of thai basil different from mammolo? and is holy basil different from thai?" to pick your seeds out you will often see stuff like "notes of clove and anise, cinnamon and warm sweetness" in the descriptions.

while the problem a minority of people have with cilantro is genetic, your herbal "problem" is learned and psychosomatic. and is unlikely to be contagious a la pontypool "verbal viruses". so we'll be fine.

i'll bet you could mentally work on hating licorice less and return to fully loving basil.

as far as fennel seeds go, if your pork-based bulk sausage mix does NOT contain abundant fennel seeds keep it the hell away from my pizza! the first time i ran into "chain cheap pizza" someone else had ordered (i think it was papa john's) i was like "what ARE these weird crusty brown blobs on here? rabbit turds?" and was informed they were "sausage". well, they all went in the garbage, meticulously picked off, but the pizza still sucked.

real sausage and mushroom pizza:
Fark user imageView Full Size


rabbit turd pizza:
Fark user imageView Full Size


NOT licorice pizza:
Fark user imageView Full Size


licorice pizza:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-12-05 2:29:30 PM  
austerity101:

It boggles my mind that there are so many licorice-like things in the world, considering how much of the population seems to hate them. You have regular licorice and salmiak, but then also fennel and star anise and then anisette, arak, pastis, ouzo, sambuca, absinthe ... why?

When you're born you are visited by the green fairy, who will bless you with the tastebuds or not. Kidding aside I'm honestly not sure why I like it. But my favorite forms are ouzo, anise pizzelles, anisettes, and absinthe cocktails. I fully realize it's almost nobodies cup of tea. A lot of my family loves black licorice, and anisettes were always a Christmas cookie tradition.
 
2021-12-05 2:33:06 PM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: luna1580: and if you didn't grow up on salt licorice, it will be the thing you get dared to eat the first time you encounter it.

Used to work with a dude that was over from Japan on a work visa, one of the things he loved like crazy was Dubbelzoute.  Apparently discovered it in a random imports place in Japan and fell in love with it, at the age of 31.  He was all worried when he came to the U.S. that he would have a hard time finding it.  (We were near L.A. so no it was easy enough, but how would he know that ahead of time so fair enough concern.)  I tried one, once.  That was more than enough.  That thing made me sinuses hurt - and not in any figurative sense.  I'm also pretty sure my lymph nodes attempted to rise up and strangle me, it was hard to tell with my tongue shriveling into dust at the time


The stuff can kill you in large amounts.  It affects your body's ability to maintain potassium levels:

https://www.consumerreports.org/consumerist/how-much-black-licorice-does-it-take-to-overdose/

Of course they're probably estimating quantity based on American licorice.  I wouldn't be surprised if the LD50 is lower for drop
 
2021-12-05 2:48:52 PM  

luna1580: Oneiros: austerity101: It boggles my mind that there are so many licorice-like things in the world, considering how much of the population seems to hate them. You have regular licorice and salmiak, but then also fennel and star anise and then anisette, arak, pastis, ouzo, sambuca, absinthe ... why?

I used to have a favorite herb (which I will not name for people's continued enjoyment of it)

One day, my mom said she likes it because it tastes like licorice.  And it doesn't until you have large quantities of it.  And you kinda have to search for it on the most popular western varieties of it, but it's there in the background.  (There are some Asian varieties where it's more pronounced)

She totally ruined that herb for me.  Not to cilantro levels, luckily-- I still use it, but I don't go crazy with it anymore.

... but for your question, I suspect some of it might be medicinal.  Fennel has some anti-microbial compounds in it, so I suspect that's why it's used in Italian sausage so much.

Or maybe it was like when I'd order mushrooms on pizza as a kid.  After many years, I could finally tolerate them, but my brother hadn't, so it was a way to make sure he didn't just eat all of the leftovers after school, as he got home earlier than I did.

So it's like the natural 'Mr Yuck' of the plant world, but some people have evolved to tolerate it

if you grow [CENSORED] you know this. when asking questions like "but how is the flavor of thai basil different from mammolo? and is holy [CENSORED] different from thai?" to pick your seeds out you will often see stuff like "notes of clove and anise, cinnamon and warm sweetness" in the descriptions.

while the problem a minority of people have with cilantro is genetic, your herbal "problem" is learned and psychosomatic. and is unlikely to be contagious a la pontypool "verbal viruses". so we'll be fine.

i'll bet you could mentally work on hating licorice less and return to fully loving [CENSORED].

as far as fennel seeds go, if your pork-based bulk sausage mix does NOT contain abundant fennel seeds keep it the hell away from my pizza! the first time i ran into "chain cheap pizza" someone else had ordered (i think it was papa john's) i was like "what ARE these weird crusty brown blobs on here? rabbit turds?" and was informed they were "sausage". well, they all went in the garbage, meticulously picked off, but the pizza still sucked.

[images trimmed]


I was trying not to say the name of the herb, so I didn't spoil it for people.  I was being vague so only the culinary savvy would figure out what I was talking about

And yes, I grow my own.  Although, I didn't use much this year, and with our town's election headaches and not going out on my deck, I lost most of it to the first cold night.

I should probably try to do a taste test to see how age affects this quality in the leaves.. maybe younger or older leaves are better than the other.

And the best pizza from a place that knows what they're doing is garlic, onion, and anchovies.  And there are no pizza places that know what they're doing near me.

/oddly enough, speaking of rodent droppings, 'muisjes', the candy I complained about translates to 'little mice' in Dutch
//and is the word for mouse turds in Belgium, according to the internet.
 
2021-12-05 2:50:54 PM  

Oneiros: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: luna1580: and if you didn't grow up on salt licorice, it will be the thing you get dared to eat the first time you encounter it.

Used to work with a dude that was over from Japan on a work visa, one of the things he loved like crazy was Dubbelzoute.  Apparently discovered it in a random imports place in Japan and fell in love with it, at the age of 31.  He was all worried when he came to the U.S. that he would have a hard time finding it.  (We were near L.A. so no it was easy enough, but how would he know that ahead of time so fair enough concern.)  I tried one, once.  That was more than enough.  That thing made me sinuses hurt - and not in any figurative sense.  I'm also pretty sure my lymph nodes attempted to rise up and strangle me, it was hard to tell with my tongue shriveling into dust at the time

The stuff can kill you in large amounts.  It affects your body's ability to maintain potassium levels:

https://www.consumerreports.org/consumerist/how-much-black-licorice-does-it-take-to-overdose/

Of course they're probably estimating quantity based on American licorice.  I wouldn't be surprised if the LD50 is lower for drop


If anyone was gonna hit it, that guy was a candidate.  He ate all kinds of absolute nonsense in a regular basis, smoked, drank like a fish outside of work, he should have been a mess.  He wasn't, the lucky son of a biatch.  I guess if you've got the right genetics, clean living is for wimps
 
2021-12-05 3:44:52 PM  

Oneiros: I was trying not to say the name of the herb, so I didn't spoil it for people.  I was being vague so only the culinary savvy would figure out what I was talking about


i understood that. but i feel this is a "you" specific mental association.

it was your favorite herb until your mom said that. but she mentioned licorice. and clearly you REALLY hate black licorice, like to the degree perhaps you have some trauma associated with the flavor. but even then you had to focus on the association and "learn" to taste something you hate inside and behind a flavor you love!

you even said:  "And you kinda have to search for it on the most popular western varieties of it, but it's there in the background."

basically you trained your taste buds to seek out the one note you dislike in SOME basil, because suddenly you could.

so i think it's highly unlikely someone already in food tab will read my response and suddenly be like "F*CK! i never knew! now i instantly taste NOTHING but licorice! burn all the basil plants to the ground now! DAMNIT!"

so i'm actually trying to free YOU from "the licorice association" you're struggling with instead.

it's totally possible! people can use cognitive behavioral therapy and exposure therapy to conquer arachnophobia, and to "unlearn" PTSD triggers after being in war or being assaulted. you could learn to "uncouple" the basil/licorice unpleasantness you are now dealing with. and perhaps forgive licorice for whatever it did to you. you don't need to LIKE it, just learn to forgive and ignore teeny tiny background notes of it amidst other complex flavors. if that works, move up to a thai basil in an asian noodle dish or something and see if you can appreciate it now.

because if this was some super-taster aversion you would have hated basil since day one of tasting it. and you didn't. so this "unpleasantness" is in your brain, not on your tongue.

and yes, you should stick with "italian sweet" varieties like globe, genovese, mammalo, lettuce leaf, etc. and yes, use young leaves from the top of the plant, you will like them better. skip the thai basil and any indian varieties unless you want to use their licorice notes specifically for exposure therapy.

you might also try growing your basil in part shade, this can mellow the flavors.
 
2021-12-05 4:11:02 PM  
I think it was here on fark that I ran across a book from the late 1800s about how to make candy.  (With an eye toward the starting businessman.)  On Archive

It's fascinating and does, indeed, have instructions for how to make sugarplums.  Also opium cough drops.
 
2021-12-05 4:13:57 PM  
Now explain prune juice...
 
2021-12-05 4:16:56 PM  

luna1580: Oneiros: I was trying not to say the name of the herb, so I didn't spoil it for people.  I was being vague so only the culinary savvy would figure out what I was talking about

i understood that. but i feel this is a "you" specific mental association.

it was your favorite herb until your mom said that. but she mentioned licorice. and clearly you REALLY hate black licorice, like to the degree perhaps you have some trauma associated with the flavor. but even then you had to focus on the association and "learn" to taste something you hate inside and behind a flavor you love!

you even said:  "And you kinda have to search for it on the most popular western varieties of it, but it's there in the background."

basically you trained your taste buds to seek out the one note you dislike in SOME basil, because suddenly you could.

so i think it's highly unlikely someone already in food tab will read my response and suddenly be like "F*CK! i never knew! now i instantly taste NOTHING but licorice! burn all the basil plants to the ground now! DAMNIT!"

so i'm actually trying to free YOU from "the licorice association" you're struggling with instead.

it's totally possible! people can use cognitive behavioral therapy and exposure therapy to conquer arachnophobia, and to "unlearn" PTSD triggers after being in war or being assaulted. you could learn to "uncouple" the basil/licorice unpleasantness you are now dealing with. and perhaps forgive licorice for whatever it did to you. you don't need to LIKE it, just learn to forgive and ignore teeny tiny background notes of it amidst other complex flavors. if that works, move up to a thai basil in an asian noodle dish or something and see if you can appreciate it now.

because if this was some super-taster aversion you would have hated basil since day one of tasting it. and you didn't. so this "unpleasantness" is in your brain, not on your tongue.

and yes, you should stick with "italian sweet" varieties like globe, genovese, mammalo, lettuce leaf, etc. and yes, use young leaves from the top of the plant, you will like them better. skip the thai basil and any indian varieties unless you want to use their licorice notes specifically for exposure therapy.

you might also try growing your basil in part shade, this can mellow the flavors.


Thanks for the tips.  But as I've actually got a formal trauma diagnosis, I don't think my issues with basil are going to be part of the discussion in therapy on Tuesday.

We'll probably focus more on things like 'not getting upset with the co-worker who spent two years rebuilding a database server, because she wasn't actually bothering to log into the damned machine even though she claimed to be making progress in our bi-weekly telecons, but would interrupt me when I was working because she wanted to talk about personal crap.  And then after I got upset with her, our group manager planned a lunch meeting with the three of us when I had presentations to finish for a meeting, and yet the lunch conversation was mostly about her planned vacation to Australia' and 'how management not listening to my complaints brings up issues that I've been angry about since childhood'
 
2021-12-05 6:50:57 PM  

cSquids: luna1580: cSquids: austerity101: Oneiros

: Sugar plums are muisjes?

Those are foul. You see a bunch of what's obviously candy on your bread, and you bite in hoping it's something delicious like hagelslag, only to find it tastes like licorice.

At least drop are obvious what they are

The real lesson is: do not accept candy from the Dutch.  Baked goods yes (like suikerbrood), but not if it has candy on top of it.  It might be fruity hagelslag, but it might be muisjes.

/does not like black licorice

It boggles my mind that there are so many licorice-like things in the world, considering how much of the population seems to hate them. You have regular licorice and salmiak, but then also fennel and star anise and then anisette, arak, pastis, ouzo, sambuca, absinthe ... why?

I suspect not liking licorice is more of a modern thing, go back even a couple of generations and I suspect it was way more popular.  As why it is in booze?  It is a strong flavor that would cover up any imperfections in distillation most likely and if people liked it at the time why not?   I personally don't mind the flavor of licorice (bought some fennel yesterday in fact)  but not every product using it, salted licorice is something you have to grow up on to truly appreciate.

and if you didn't grow up on salt licorice, it will be the thing you get dared to eat the first time you encounter it.

my first day working in an old fashioned candy shop i was dared to eat a piece of dubbelzoute, so i did.

and i exclaimed "my god! it's like drinking a dirty martini made with sambuca while standing in the middle of the ocean with your mouth wide open to the waves!" it was so intense it was like a spiritual shock, nearly an out-of-body experience. good times, good times!

I have Scandinavian people bring some as gifts and others try to get me try it in Scandinavian countries, I think as a joke.  They are fully aware how niche of a product it is in other countries.  I enjoyed the aquavit, also full of licorice flavors though!


This!

I dated a Norwegian for a while.

Candy is not supposed to be that hard-core of licorice let alone containing what has to be a lethal amount of sodium.

She thought it was funny as hell. I thought it was cruel and unusual punishment.
 
2021-12-05 8:45:21 PM  

cSquids: austerity101: Oneiros: Sugar plums are muisjes?

Those are foul. You see a bunch of what's obviously candy on your bread, and you bite in hoping it's something delicious like hagelslag, only to find it tastes like licorice.

At least drop are obvious what they are

The real lesson is: do not accept candy from the Dutch.  Baked goods yes (like suikerbrood), but not if it has candy on top of it.  It might be fruity hagelslag, but it might be muisjes.

/does not like black licorice

It boggles my mind that there are so many licorice-like things in the world, considering how much of the population seems to hate them. You have regular licorice and salmiak, but then also fennel and star anise and then anisette, arak, pastis, ouzo, sambuca, absinthe ... why?

I suspect not liking licorice is more of a modern thing, go back even a couple of generations and I suspect it was way more popular.  As why it is in booze?  It is a strong flavor that would cover up any imperfections in distillation most likely and if people liked it at the time why not?   I personally don't mind the flavor of licorice (bought some fennel yesterday in fact)  but not every product using it, salted licorice is something you have to grow up on to truly appreciate.


I suspect there's a genetic element in how the taste of liquorice is perceived. It's extremely popular in Northern Europe and as far as I can tell, nowhere else. People also tend to either lose or hate it passionately.
 
2021-12-06 12:18:23 AM  

luna1580: A sugarplum is a form of candy called a comfit (not to be confused with confit; why is this getting worse?). A comfit is like a seed, nut, or bit of spice coated with a layer of hard sugar.

so jordan almonds are modern sugar plums? that's easy enough to understand. not my favorite for eating, but my maternal g-ma loved them. and i don't find the absence of actual dried plums to be quite the shocking betrayal our poor author does:

There's not even a single plum within a mile of a sugarplum. If I sound riled up, it's because I am. I had no idea.

ok. the takeout/lifehacker, simmer down now. moving on....


At least there's no mayo involved... this time.
 
2021-12-06 1:10:29 AM  

luna1580: Oneiros: I was trying not to say the name of the herb, so I didn't spoil it for people.  I was being vague so only the culinary savvy would figure out what I was talking about

i understood that. but i feel this is a "you" specific mental association.

it was your favorite herb until your mom said that. but she mentioned licorice. and clearly you REALLY hate black licorice, like to the degree perhaps you have some trauma associated with the flavor. but even then you had to focus on the association and "learn" to taste something you hate inside and behind a flavor you love!

you even said:  "And you kinda have to search for it on the most popular western varieties of it, but it's there in the background."

basically you trained your taste buds to seek out the one note you dislike in SOME basil, because suddenly you could.

so i think it's highly unlikely someone already in food tab will read my response and suddenly be like "F*CK! i never knew! now i instantly taste NOTHING but licorice! burn all the basil plants to the ground now! DAMNIT!"

so i'm actually trying to free YOU from "the licorice association" you're struggling with instead.

it's totally possible! people can use cognitive behavioral therapy and exposure therapy to conquer arachnophobia, and to "unlearn" PTSD triggers after being in war or being assaulted. you could learn to "uncouple" the basil/licorice unpleasantness you are now dealing with. and perhaps forgive licorice for whatever it did to you. you don't need to LIKE it, just learn to forgive and ignore teeny tiny background notes of it amidst other complex flavors. if that works, move up to a thai basil in an asian noodle dish or something and see if you can appreciate it now.

because if this was some super-taster aversion you would have hated basil since day one of tasting it. and you didn't. so this "unpleasantness" is in your brain, not on your tongue.

and yes, you should stick with "italian sweet" varieties like globe, genovese, mammalo, lettuce leaf, etc. and yes, use young leaves from the top of the plant, you will like them better. skip the thai basil and any indian varieties unless you want to use their licorice notes specifically for exposure therapy.

you might also try growing your basil in part shade, this can mellow the flavors.


Thai basil syrup is insanely good in limeade and lemonade. Vodka is of course optional.
 
2021-12-06 3:12:34 AM  

Chabash: luna1580: A sugarplum is a form of candy called a comfit (not to be confused with confit; why is this getting worse?). A comfit is like a seed, nut, or bit of spice coated with a layer of hard sugar.

so jordan almonds are modern sugar plums? that's easy enough to understand. not my favorite for eating, but my maternal g-ma loved them. and i don't find the absence of actual dried plums to be quite the shocking betrayal our poor author does:

There's not even a single plum within a mile of a sugarplum. If I sound riled up, it's because I am. I had no idea.

ok. the takeout/lifehacker, simmer down now. moving on....

At least there's no mayo involved... this time.


You know, I was just wondering how Claire would have approached this article.
 
2021-12-06 8:30:38 AM  

HairBolus: Oneiros: Sugar plums are muisjes?

You are confusing anise with licorice. Real licorice contains  glycyrrhizin, which gives it a weird sweetness that many find enjoyable.

For real licorice real sugar real plums I somewhat recommend Chinese preserved plums, Li hing mui 旅行梅. which contain sugar, licorice, and salt, and often look like:

[Fark user image image 269x179]

Years back at some local Chinese store I found a variant that was less salty and less desiccated that I prefer - it was more like prune flesh, but since then I've been unable to figure out how to ask for them by name.


I normally like licorice, even the strong Scandinavian ones.  I like ouzo and anisette , and I always eat the black jelly beans no one else wants.  But the dried salted plums rolled in Satan's dingleberry dust are too much.

Every couple of years I try one, thinking maybe I've only eaten ones that were stale or rotten...but nope, those things are born rotten.
 
2021-12-06 9:12:39 AM  
cdn.shopify.comView Full Size
 
2021-12-06 10:46:36 AM  

austerity101: It boggles my mind that there are so many people wearing masks in the world, considering how much of the population seems to hate them. You have surgical masks and cloth masks, but then also gaiters and bandanas and n95 masks and KN95s ... why?


... obviously there's a bit more of a reason with the masks, but the overall sentiment remains the same. Same goes for pineapple on pizza.

It's just a vocal, whiny group of people that get all the publicity. People who like licorice don't need to go cry about it in every thread.

Same with those of us who think raisins in cookies are just fine.

/like licorice, pineapple on pizza, raisins in cookies, AND masks & vaccines.
 
Ant
2021-12-06 1:41:58 PM  

HairBolus: For real licorice real sugar real plums I somewhat recommend Chinese preserved plums, Li hing mui 旅行梅. which contain sugar, licorice, and salt, and often look like:


I farking love those things!
 
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