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(Wikipedia)   Fifty years ago, an entire generation started to die of dysentery   (en.wikipedia.org) divider line
    More: Vintage, Video game, strategy video game, Oregon Trail, Windows games, Educational video games, computer game, Don Rawitsch, school children  
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1243 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 04 Dec 2021 at 9:02 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



28 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-12-04 9:19:15 AM  
You shot 738 pounds of buffalo.

You carry 40 pounds back to your wagon.
 
2021-12-04 9:23:45 AM  
i.kym-cdn.comView Full Size
 
2021-12-04 9:39:51 AM  
We didn't really get introduced to Oregon trail until the third grade computer lab, around '88 or so.  But computer lab was always effectively 45 minutes of playing time, and there was no way to save, so Oregon Trail hit a plateau as far as entertaining us.

By 5th grade we moved on to Odell Lake, because you could complete a play-through in enough time that you had 2-3 chances to rack up a high score to compare to your friends.

We still liked Oregon Trail, but we played it so infrequently because we never had the time to finish a play-through.  Which meant we always played as the banker, never trying for a high score with farmer.  I finally did win the game as a farmer playing on a IIe emulator circa 2009.

I do like the trend of sociologists defining the mini-generation between Gen X and Millenials as "The Oregon Trail Generation".  It captures a key component of this generation's dichotomy.  We came of age in the late 80s and 90s, growing up with technology but not social media.  We can adapt to most changes in tech, but we don't have the incriminating pictures and tweets from when we were 15.
 
2021-12-04 9:41:53 AM  
XYZZY
 
2021-12-04 9:43:04 AM  
Oregon Trail was a little after my time, I think.

But I recall a few epic MULE sessions on my Atari 800.
 
2021-12-04 9:45:50 AM  
We played on terminals connected to an H-P 3000 over 300 baud modems in 1975.

If you're not going to mow that lawn, you are politely invited to vacate said lawn.
 
2021-12-04 10:01:48 AM  
Are you telling me that they aren't still playing Oregon Trail in third grade computer class? World went and got itself in a big damn hurry.
 
2021-12-04 10:07:34 AM  
That's a trigger. There's  a great Eddie Izzard bit where he talks about people restoring parts of Miami to just the way it was FIFTY YEARS AGOOOOO. The wife and I are so idiotic that whenever the phrase pops up, it's FIFTY YEARS AGOOOOO.
 
2021-12-04 10:23:39 AM  
i always preferred lemonade stand.
 
2021-12-04 10:33:32 AM  

yakmans_dad: That's a trigger. There's  a great Eddie Izzard bit where he talks about people restoring parts of Miami to just the way it was FIFTY YEARS AGOOOOO. The wife and I are so idiotic that whenever the phrase pops up, it's FIFTY YEARS AGOOOOO.


That was kinda the big time for the first restoration of the 'deco district' .
Also they kept all the blacks in Liberty City and Overton.
 
2021-12-04 10:58:29 AM  
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2021-12-04 11:18:50 AM  
You come across a 400 feet wide river that's 10 feet deep. Do you:

A) Ford the River like an idiot
B) Caulk the Wagon and hope for the best
C) Start the game over if you die, because I'm not playing the rest of this with 1 ox, 3 bullets and 2 party members.
 
2021-12-04 11:38:31 AM  
Dysentery?   Just say it.
You shat yourself to death.

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2021-12-04 11:45:45 AM  

UNC_Samurai: By 5th grade we moved on to Odell Lake, because you could complete a play-through in enough time that you had 2-3 chances to rack up a high score to compare to your friends.


Goddamn ospreys.
 
2021-12-04 11:49:42 AM  
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2021-12-04 12:11:58 PM  
50 years ago, subby? 50 years ago was 1971, when subby's mom's bush was as big as a tumbleweed.
 
2021-12-04 12:15:49 PM  

mononymous: 50 years ago, subby? 50 years ago was 1971, when subby's mom's bush was as big as a tumbleweed.


Someone did not RTFA.
 
2021-12-04 12:47:05 PM  

UNC_Samurai: We didn't really get introduced to Oregon trail until the third grade computer lab, around '88 or so.  But computer lab was always effectively 45 minutes of playing time, and there was no way to save, so Oregon Trail hit a plateau as far as entertaining us.


By the time I reached 4th or 5th grade, I had learned the game well enough to beat it in just that amount time if you were lucky enough to never lose on your first playthrough of your alloted class time.
 
2021-12-04 1:25:33 PM  

UNC_Samurai: I do like the trend of sociologists defining the mini-generation between Gen X and Millenials as "The Oregon Trail Generation".  It captures a key component of this generation's dichotomy.  We came of age in the late 80s and 90s, growing up with technology but not social media.  We can adapt to most changes in tech, but we don't have the incriminating pictures and tweets from when we were 15.


Tend to be a bit better at tech because of having to fark with shiat like autoexec.bat and IRQ assignments, instead of having everything mostly just work.
 
2021-12-04 1:34:43 PM  

NeoCortex42: [i.kym-cdn.com image 500x529]


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2021-12-04 1:52:39 PM  
The most fun I had in middle school was playing Oregon Trail in computer class, and coming up with stuff to put on my tombstone.
 
2021-12-04 2:32:25 PM  

Nick el Ass: The most fun I had in middle school was playing Oregon Trail in computer class, and coming up with stuff to put on my tombstone.


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2021-12-04 4:05:12 PM  

bostonguy: mononymous: 50 years ago, subby? 50 years ago was 1971, when subby's mom's bush was as big as a tumbleweed.

Someone did not RTFA.


Ok, just RTFAed.  Interesting story.  Never played Oregon Trail, but assume that most of the game could work on a teletype.  Not sure how big it would be, but it wasn't included in BASIC Computer Games or More BASIC Computer Games (presumably like Adventure and Zork, it was copyrighted and/or written in something other than BASIC.  Or possibly just to big to type in).

Probably the most extremely successful "updates" of ancient computer games was transforming the text only "Star Trek" into the 3Dish video game "Star Raiders" [for Atari 400/800] (the original Star Trek was just flying around a square galaxy and blowing up Klingon starships).
 
2021-12-04 4:21:57 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: Ok, just RTFAed.  Interesting story.  Never played Oregon Trail, but assume that most of the game could work on a teletype.  Not sure how big it would be, but it wasn't included in BASIC Computer Games or More BASIC Computer Games (presumably like Adventure and Zork, it was copyrighted and/or written in something other than BASIC.  Or possibly just to big to type in).


The entire game was originally played using a teletype. The source code for the 1975 version is here: https://www.filfre.net/misc/

Oregon Trail -v1 (1975) - HP 2100 - WIN! HD
Youtube NAI8Ysqbq7E
 
2021-12-04 5:08:23 PM  
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2021-12-04 5:40:49 PM  
Now do it as an open world shooter like Fallout
 
2021-12-04 9:57:01 PM  
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2021-12-05 2:07:16 PM  
A guy who does gaming podcasts up in Minnesota made a pretty interesting documentary about it that was nominated for an Emmy. Definitely worth the watch if you have any interest in the game.
Trailheads: The Oregon Trail's Origins Documentary
Youtube _EHdZUrMi4w
 
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