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(WSMV Nashville)   Vroom customers warn of making major purchases over the net from a silly named Texas company with an "F" rating   (wsmv.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Automobile, resident Don Coleman, Better Business Bureau, car company Vroom, Vehicle, customer of vroom, Chevrolet, car title  
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1568 clicks; posted to Business » on 04 Dec 2021 at 1:05 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



19 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-12-03 8:45:06 PM  
Don't put Tesla down like that!
 
2021-12-03 11:03:45 PM  
Hehe.  That last line where they reached out to the Texas AG. I guess they don't realize we have a crazy AG in charge. It'll be a long wait.
 
2021-12-04 1:08:04 AM  
c.tenor.comView Full Size
 
2021-12-04 1:55:34 AM  
 
2021-12-04 2:08:43 AM  
> "As I was on the phone with them, Vroom continued to say it was their fault! They admitted it was their fault. They said that they did not turn in the financing to the lender fast enough. According to the appropriate time. And now as a customer of vroom, I have to pay for their mistakes," Coleman said.

Isn't that a common scam, to force you into a higher-rate loan than you thought you were getting when you agreed to the purchase?
 
2021-12-04 2:56:39 AM  

Enigmamf: > "As I was on the phone with them, Vroom continued to say it was their fault! They admitted it was their fault. They said that they did not turn in the financing to the lender fast enough. According to the appropriate time. And now as a customer of vroom, I have to pay for their mistakes," Coleman said.

Isn't that a common scam, to force you into a higher-rate loan than you thought you were getting when you agreed to the purchase?


I had a mortgage company try to tell me that my verbal agreement to 2.7% with no points meant I was contractually bound to stick with them after they "ran my real credit this time using their own algorithm to interpret it" and that I'd have to accept 3.8%. She tried to claim I could not go with anyone else at that point.

farking hilarious to me, but the fact the idiot even tried it suggests it works. Not really the same as the scam you mention, but these people are scammers through and through.
 
2021-12-04 5:26:40 AM  
So, I shouldn't buy this '89 Land Rover?
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-12-04 7:00:29 AM  
"make sure that you get your title and registration from the company IN PERSON!"

How the hell does that work? The title isn't done instantaneously. Usually it takes a 5-10 days to get done by a reputable dealership, then you get it either in person(if you request it) or in the mail. Sure, you get some similar papers to show ownership but not the actual title.
 
2021-12-04 9:56:06 AM  

Smackledorfer: Enigmamf: > "As I was on the phone with them, Vroom continued to say it was their fault! They admitted it was their fault. They said that they did not turn in the financing to the lender fast enough. According to the appropriate time. And now as a customer of vroom, I have to pay for their mistakes," Coleman said.

Isn't that a common scam, to force you into a higher-rate loan than you thought you were getting when you agreed to the purchase?

I had a mortgage company try to tell me that my verbal agreement to 2.7% with no points meant I was contractually bound to stick with them after they "ran my real credit this time using their own algorithm to interpret it" and that I'd have to accept 3.8%. She tried to claim I could not go with anyone else at that point.

farking hilarious to me, but the fact the idiot even tried it suggests it works. Not really the same as the scam you mention, but these people are scammers through and through.


I had some random company say they bought mine and to start paying them now. I checked with my current lender and it wasn't true. That is a hell of a scam I've had my loan sold a few times and I've always be informed by the current one they sold it.
 
2021-12-04 11:14:13 AM  
maddox.xmission.comView Full Size
 
2021-12-04 11:29:28 AM  
I haven't dealt with a lost title in a while, but perhaps if you do a lost title search the company won't respond and you could steal the car with a lien free title... I know, barn finds are a different line at the DMV.
 
2021-12-04 12:13:57 PM  
Something is not adding up here.

If you finance the vehicle, you never get a copy of the title - the lender holds the title until the last payment. When you register the car with the DMV, the lender sends the DMV a copy of the title - you never get to touch it.

Having bought a car from Carvana in 2019, I went through all of this. It came with temporary tags, they sent the title to the DMV, and I had to go in-person to complete the registration and get the plates. And then when I moved states, I again had to get them to send the title to the DMV (well actually, the company that financed the loan). And, my new state, Georgia, completed the registration and gave me a plate before they received the title from the lender (when I registered the vehicle, I provided them all of the information about the loan).

I wonder how many of these people aren't registering the car because they think they're going to get the title and cannot go into the DMV until they have it in-hand.
 
2021-12-04 12:29:11 PM  
For many people, obtaining a car is three separate transactions: selling the old one, obtaining money for the new one, and actually purchasing the new one. It is generally a bad idea to combine these actions. In particular, do not ever, ever finance with the dealer unless it is such a good deal that you just can't turn it down (for instance, a national program run by the auto maker for 0% / xxx months). You can usually sell your used car yourself for more than you would get in a trade. I rarely trade, there's always a child or a niece or a nephew who needs a starter car and I just give my old ones away, but it's not difficult to sell a used car unless it is a complete piece of junk, and in that case most wrecker yards will give you a couple hundred for it and tow it away for you.

Get your loans from your own bank or credit union. My credit union is terrific, I use them for everything. If you have an account and have kept it up they will pretty much always loan you money at a better rate than a finance company, and you have a lot more control over it. If I have a loan, it's just a few clicks away. My current car loan (just bought a new one, my last new car finally shed the transmission after sixteen years and a third of a million miles) is a whopping point nine percent.

If you buy from a dealer, the bank/credit union can issue you a sight order rather than a check. You take that to the dealer. The dealer gets their money after the bank/credit union gets proof that you have the car and after they have the title in hand. In states like mine where the owner holds the title (your mileage may very, some states hold car titles themselves) the bank/credit union adds their lien to the title and sends it to you. If you are purchasing cash, you can still go that route; the bank takes your money and issues the sight order (which gives you a bit more leverage at the dealer) and just forwards the title to you with no lien.

And when you buy/sell a used car, you meet at the buyer's bank. The buyer has the bank print off a check and the seller has the title notarized on the spot and you trade paper. No muss, no fuss, no risk to either party.
 
2021-12-04 12:55:47 PM  
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2021-12-04 1:10:35 PM  

thornhill: Something is not adding up here.

If you finance the vehicle, you never get a copy of the title - the lender holds the title until the last payment. When you register the car with the DMV, the lender sends the DMV a copy of the title - you never get to touch it.

Having bought a car from Carvana in 2019, I went through all of this. It came with temporary tags, they sent the title to the DMV, and I had to go in-person to complete the registration and get the plates. And then when I moved states, I again had to get them to send the title to the DMV (well actually, the company that financed the loan). And, my new state, Georgia, completed the registration and gave me a plate before they received the title from the lender (when I registered the vehicle, I provided them all of the information about the loan).

I wonder how many of these people aren't registering the car because they think they're going to get the title and cannot go into the DMV until they have it in-hand.


Hmmm... When you pay off your car in Texas, the finance company will electronically transfer the title to you( via the gov), and the tax assessor for county you live in will send you a paper copy. That's your title. That copy is what you use to sign over the car to another person/entity if you sell it. They will then have to go to the tax assessor to have it transferred into their name, and they will receive their paper copy of a new title in a few weeks. Usually...
 
2021-12-04 1:17:25 PM  

FlippityFlap: thornhill: Something is not adding up here.

If you finance the vehicle, you never get a copy of the title - the lender holds the title until the last payment. When you register the car with the DMV, the lender sends the DMV a copy of the title - you never get to touch it.

Having bought a car from Carvana in 2019, I went through all of this. It came with temporary tags, they sent the title to the DMV, and I had to go in-person to complete the registration and get the plates. And then when I moved states, I again had to get them to send the title to the DMV (well actually, the company that financed the loan). And, my new state, Georgia, completed the registration and gave me a plate before they received the title from the lender (when I registered the vehicle, I provided them all of the information about the loan).

I wonder how many of these people aren't registering the car because they think they're going to get the title and cannot go into the DMV until they have it in-hand.

Hmmm... When you pay off your car in Texas, the finance company will electronically transfer the title to you( via the gov), and the tax assessor for county you live in will send you a paper copy. That's your title. That copy is what you use to sign over the car to another person/entity if you sell it. They will then have to go to the tax assessor to have it transferred into their name, and they will receive their paper copy of a new title in a few weeks. Usually...


I don't see how that conflicts with what I said because you're still not getting the title until after the final payment.
 
2021-12-04 1:58:29 PM  

thornhill: Something is not adding up here.

If you finance the vehicle, you never get a copy of the title - the lender holds the title until the last payment. When you register the car with the DMV, the lender sends the DMV a copy of the title - you never get to touch it.

Having bought a car from Carvana in 2019, I went through all of this. It came with temporary tags, they sent the title to the DMV, and I had to go in-person to complete the registration and get the plates. And then when I moved states, I again had to get them to send the title to the DMV (well actually, the company that financed the loan). And, my new state, Georgia, completed the registration and gave me a plate before they received the title from the lender (when I registered the vehicle, I provided them all of the information about the loan).

I wonder how many of these people aren't registering the car because they think they're going to get the title and cannot go into the DMV until they have it in-hand.


It depends on whether the buyer lives in a title holding State.  Oklahoma is one such State where the buyer receives the title -- PERIOD.  Now, if there is a lien on said title, the title is noted as such.  The buyer receives a notice once the lien has been satisfied AND SHOULD ATTACH SAID NOTICE OF SATISFACTION TO SAID TITLE AT THAT TIME.  Losing the payoff notice can lead to serious problems when the buyer wishes to divest himself/herself of the vehicle.
 
2021-12-04 2:21:30 PM  

Chief Superintendent Lookout: thornhill: Something is not adding up here.

If you finance the vehicle, you never get a copy of the title - the lender holds the title until the last payment. When you register the car with the DMV, the lender sends the DMV a copy of the title - you never get to touch it.

Having bought a car from Carvana in 2019, I went through all of this. It came with temporary tags, they sent the title to the DMV, and I had to go in-person to complete the registration and get the plates. And then when I moved states, I again had to get them to send the title to the DMV (well actually, the company that financed the loan). And, my new state, Georgia, completed the registration and gave me a plate before they received the title from the lender (when I registered the vehicle, I provided them all of the information about the loan).

I wonder how many of these people aren't registering the car because they think they're going to get the title and cannot go into the DMV until they have it in-hand.

It depends on whether the buyer lives in a title holding State.  Oklahoma is one such State where the buyer receives the title -- PERIOD.  Now, if there is a lien on said title, the title is noted as such.  The buyer receives a notice once the lien has been satisfied AND SHOULD ATTACH SAID NOTICE OF SATISFACTION TO SAID TITLE AT THAT TIME.  Losing the payoff notice can lead to serious problems when the buyer wishes to divest himself/herself of the vehicle.


FYI: There are only 9 states that do this.
 
2021-12-04 9:27:46 PM  

buckwebb: Hehe.  That last line where they reached out to the Texas AG. I guess they don't realize we have a crazy AG in charge. It'll be a long wait.


All they have to do is tell cross eyed Ken that Vroom sold a car to a pregnant woman, who then drove it out of state for an abortion.

He'll have his entire office staff on the case.

....puts hand over ear..... What's that?  His entire staff quit?
 
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