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221 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 03 Dec 2021 at 2:20 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-12-03 11:25:12 AM  
Original Tweet:

 
2021-12-03 11:48:50 AM  
American Prometheus on J. Robert Oppenheimer life. His childhood education being a huge force in his adulthood was interesting.
 
2021-12-03 12:12:30 PM  
Adrian Carton de Wiart, no contest. He got blown up in WWI and WWII, and still titled his book "Happy Odyssey".
 
2021-12-03 12:13:59 PM  
Mao: The unknown story.  It's like a living horror novel.
 
2021-12-03 12:16:51 PM  
Winston Churchill, the William Manchester one.
 
2021-12-03 12:23:05 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: Mao: The unknown story.  It's like a living horror novel.


That sounds like my next beach book read. A cold adult beverage while reading I think would be appropriate.
 
2021-12-03 12:28:18 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-12-03 12:32:25 PM  
Michael Collins
 
2021-12-03 12:44:29 PM  
Not sure for biography, but I'll pick two autobiographies:

1. Under a Hoodoo Moon by Dr. John (with Jack Rummel)
2. Trejo: My Life of Crime, Redemption, and Hollywood by Danny Trejo (with Donal Logue -- yes, that Donal Logue)

Dr. John's autobiography goes into as much detail about the people and places around him as it does his own life, if not more, and it offers a fascinating window into a number of areas and ways of life that are pretty much gone now. Plus, when he does actually offer up something about himself, like the way he turned to playing piano from guitar after accidentally shooting a finger off (it was reattached), or how he manged to tour for years while being a fugitive from the law, it's a story so odd and full of twists and turns that I'm not sure that The Coen Brothers, Jim Jarmusch, and Orson Welles together could have done it justice.

The first 25 or so years of Trejo's life had enough crime, drama, and tragedy to rival anything on The Sopranos or Sons of Anarchy, but that's only the start of his story. He's been clean and sober for over 50 years, but he's never forgotten and in some ways has never completely left that life. His stories of working with the likes of Pacino, DeNiro, Val Kilmer, and John Cusack are always interesting, but it's the ways they intersect with his previous life that are often the most unexpected and enlightening. Trejo also does a remarkable job of being honest about how the choices he has made, even long after going straight, have often let himself and his family down. He's never maudlin about it and doesn't seem to expect or even want sympathy...which is precisely why he elicits so much, at least from me.
 
2021-12-03 12:57:21 PM  
Staying Tuned: A Life in Journalism by Daniel Schorr
 
2021-12-03 1:04:48 PM  
The Years of Lyndon Johnson by Caro... 40 years and counting...

Please don't anyone give me spoilers.


One I actually read?

Power Broker, also by Caro. The life of Robert Moses. What a f*cking dickbag.
 
2021-12-03 1:27:00 PM  
After hearing about Robert E Lee a few too many times, I decided I needed to learn more about the correct side of history; so I read William Tecumsah Sherman's memoirs. Fascinating read, turned me into a bit of a civil war buff. I went on to read Grant's and Sheridan's memoirs.

The bit of history on my native state of California was an unexpected bonus from Sherman. Best bit of early state history since Richard Dana's Two Years Before the Mast.
 
2021-12-03 1:40:48 PM  
Panzer General by Heinz Guiderion.
 
2021-12-03 2:25:58 PM  
Sir Richard Francis Burton. There are several biographies.

A real polymath, adventurer, and intellectual. He led an absolutely amazing life.
 
2021-12-03 2:26:30 PM  
All Blood Runs Red about Eugene Bullard I read in the last year, fascinating.

In sports I Was Right On Time by Buck O'Neil.  This one has stuck with me.  I learned a lot about grace but with persistence during times of adversity.
 
2021-12-03 2:28:21 PM  
Not sure about fascinating but this one was pretty damn funny

Fark user imageView Full Size


And this one was surprisingly good and funny

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-12-03 2:29:32 PM  
Errol Flynn: The Untold Story when I was very young and impressionable , left confused.
 
2021-12-03 2:31:46 PM  
Montgomery Clift by Patricia Bosworth.

Looking forward to getting around to her Protest Song: Paul Robeson, J. Edgar Hoover, and the Ongoing Fight for Racial Equality which is being published posthumously as sadly she left us last year due to COVID-related complications.
 
2021-12-03 2:36:34 PM  
Goodbye to All That by Robert Graves. If you haven't read it, find it and read it. I must have re-read it 10 times over the years.

Just the other day, though, I went to a used book store hoping to find Herndon's biography of Lincoln. I understand that's first rate.

If' you've never read 2 classics of biography -- Boswell's Johnson or Walden -- don't be put off by their "classic" status. They're as enjoyable to read as anything you can find. Both of their subjects are extremely good company.
 
2021-12-03 2:38:01 PM  

hermit: After hearing about Robert E Lee a few too many times, I decided I needed to learn more about the correct side of history; so I read William Tecumsah Sherman's memoirs. Fascinating read, turned me into a bit of a civil war buff. I went on to read Grant's and Sheridan's memoirs.

The bit of history on my native state of California was an unexpected bonus from Sherman. Best bit of early state history since Richard Dana's Two Years Before the Mast.


I read a bio of Lee and remember nothing of it except that he had the feet of a small girl -- like size 6 or something -- and had his children tickle them for him.
 
2021-12-03 2:48:34 PM  
Craig Ferguson's autobiography, American on Purpose.  The audiobook version, read by him, is especially fun.
 
2021-12-03 2:50:31 PM  
Lol, "not just sports".
 
2021-12-03 2:57:17 PM  
Diplomatically Speaking, about Lloyd Carpenter Griscom. He was a diplomat around WWI and WWII for the US, and his story gave me great respect for the State Department.
 
2021-12-03 3:05:07 PM  

FrancoFile: Craig Ferguson's autobiography, American on Purpose.  The audiobook version, read by him, is especially fun.


Thank you for the shopping tip. I love Ferguson and think I'd really dig his reading of an audiobook.
 
2021-12-03 3:20:50 PM  
Paul Muad'Dib
 
2021-12-03 3:22:56 PM  
Babylon 5 creator J. Michael Straczynski's autobiography is a hell of a ride.
 
2021-12-03 3:27:27 PM  

hebrides: Not sure for biography, but I'll pick two autobiographies:

1. Under a Hoodoo Moon by Dr. John (with Jack Rummel)
2. Trejo: My Life of Crime, Redemption, and Hollywood by Danny Trejo (with Donal Logue -- yes, that Donal Logue)

Dr. John's autobiography goes into as much detail about the people and places around him as it does his own life, if not more, and it offers a fascinating window into a number of areas and ways of life that are pretty much gone now. Plus, when he does actually offer up something about himself, like the way he turned to playing piano from guitar after accidentally shooting a finger off (it was reattached), or how he manged to tour for years while being a fugitive from the law, it's a story so odd and full of twists and turns that I'm not sure that The Coen Brothers, Jim Jarmusch, and Orson Welles together could have done it justice.

The first 25 or so years of Trejo's life had enough crime, drama, and tragedy to rival anything on The Sopranos or Sons of Anarchy, but that's only the start of his story. He's been clean and sober for over 50 years, but he's never forgotten and in some ways has never completely left that life. His stories of working with the likes of Pacino, DeNiro, Val Kilmer, and John Cusack are always interesting, but it's the ways they intersect with his previous life that are often the most unexpected and enlightening. Trejo also does a remarkable job of being honest about how the choices he has made, even long after going straight, have often let himself and his family down. He's never maudlin about it and doesn't seem to expect or even want sympathy...which is precisely why he elicits so much, at least from me.


I'm not big into Bios but I'd read Trejo's.  He's been pretty up front about his past and used to talk about it regularly on air with one the local radio DJs.
 
2021-12-03 3:34:56 PM  
There have been a couple I have really liked:

"Truman" by David McCullough. Really in-depth look at his life.

"Yeager" by Chuck Yeager and Leo Janos. It covers a fascinating time in aviation history.
 
2021-12-03 3:40:23 PM  
When a young person asks me to recommend a book, and I don't know much about them, I recommend this one:

i.ebayimg.comView Full Size


For young men, it's a no-brainer.

For young women, I tell them, "You can accomplish the same kinds of things.  It doesn't have to be about airplanes.  Don't let anyone tell you that you can't."
 
2021-12-03 3:40:55 PM  

Old_Chief_Scott: There have been a couple I have really liked:

"Truman" by David McCullough. Really in-depth look at his life.

"Yeager" by Chuck Yeager and Leo Janos. It covers a fascinating time in aviation history.


<fistbump>
 
2021-12-03 3:48:25 PM  
I just finished reading "I Am Spock"
It only covers Star Trek (show and movies) not Nimoy's whole life.
It was interesting, I wouldn't call it fascinating, but since it's all about Spock, fascinating fits.
 
2021-12-03 3:57:24 PM  
William Dampier, A Pirate of Exquisite Mind

Nathaniel Courthope , Nathaniel's Nutmeg

The Inordinately Strange Life of Dyce Sombre

McCullough's John Adams
 
2021-12-03 3:58:27 PM  

mikey15: Errol Flynn: The Untold Story when I was very young and impressionable , left confused.


I would recommend his actual autobiography, "My wicked, wicked ways", finished not long before his abused body finally gave out in Cuba, of all places.
 
2021-12-03 4:00:09 PM  
Timothy Leary's autobiography Flashbacks was pretty cool.

When he got arrested for a joint, the prison gave him a psychological test to determine where to sent him. It was a test that he had helped create. So, he knew how to give answers indicating he was docile, submissive to authority figures, liked being outdoors.... So they sentenced him to a minimum security prison without access outside.

Then he climbed over fence and escaped.
Ta-daah!
 
2021-12-03 4:03:25 PM  

FrancoFile: Craig Ferguson's autobiography, American on Purpose


Was going to check it out of the library to bring home, ended up sitting on a library comfy chair and downing the whole book at once.
 
2021-12-03 4:04:54 PM  
Malcolm X
 
2021-12-03 4:09:38 PM  
Wikipedia
 
2021-12-03 4:13:46 PM  

Monkey2: Michael Collins


Very good.

Adolf Galland was interesting but it was mostly about trying to make the Luftwaffe work despite Hitler.

I've read a number of biographies of US generals and they're usually interesting. A lot of guys come from humble beginnings.

Ernie Pyle was very interesting.
 
2021-12-03 4:15:51 PM  
P.T.Barnum
 
2021-12-03 4:16:10 PM  
Just Kids by Patti Smith is phenomenal.
 
2021-12-03 4:17:58 PM  
 
2021-12-03 4:33:34 PM  

edmo: I've read a number of biographies of US generals and they're usually interesting. A lot of guys come from humble beginnings.


I would recommend Norman Schwarzkopf's biography. Colin Powell's is good but it felt like it was lacking a little humanity sometimes.
 
2021-12-03 4:37:33 PM  
Just read 'The Boys: A Memoir of Hollywood and Family' by Ron and Clint Howard, and quite enjoyed it.  I would offer that it should be required reading for any parents of child actors on how to be properly supportive.
 
2021-12-03 4:38:56 PM  
images.penguinrandomhouse.comView Full Size


Anything by Nick Tosches is pretty great.
 
2021-12-03 4:51:11 PM  

Myk-House of El: All Blood Runs Red about Eugene Bullard I read in the last year, fascinating.

In sports I Was Right On Time by Buck O'Neil.  This one has stuck with me.  I learned a lot about grace but with persistence during times of adversity.


Have you read The Soul of Baseball by Joe Posnanski?  He follows Buck around for a while and writes about it.  Buck was an incredibly wonderful person.
 
2021-12-03 5:07:18 PM  
My favorite read was super short and to the point:

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size
 
2021-12-03 5:15:50 PM  

LL316: Myk-House of El: All Blood Runs Red about Eugene Bullard I read in the last year, fascinating.

In sports I Was Right On Time by Buck O'Neil.  This one has stuck with me.  I learned a lot about grace but with persistence during times of adversity.

Have you read The Soul of Baseball by Joe Posnanski?  He follows Buck around for a while and writes about it.  Buck was an incredibly wonderful person.


I own Posnanski's book as well.  Actually read it first, then went back for Buck's.  And I would recommend both.  The Soul of Baseball is not a true biography, but still.  The thing about Buck O'Neil is in reading both, I know he wasn't by any means unaware of the horrors of this world, but he still chose the path of love and finding the good in people.  I'm both kind of glad he didn't have to witness the last few years, but kinda think we need a Buck O'Neil right now.

And I forgot a biography I really love.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-12-03 5:43:59 PM  
Chuck Yeager.  I always wondered if he was tempted to land at a nearby airfield, strap a deer to his nosecone, then do a slow speed approach to a bigger, official airfield.

Seriously the author (not gonna disturb a snoring kitty for you lazy farks) wrote Skunkworks, which was great, and the Yeager autobiography.  Both are well worth reading, even if you like fiction.  Cuz both of these books read like fiction if you don't know the background.
 
2021-12-03 5:49:38 PM  
img.thriftbooks.comView Full Size
 
2021-12-03 5:50:48 PM  
Clinging to the Wreckage by John Mortimer
 
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