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(Architectural Digest)   It's not that your boss won't allow you to work from home because he has an AOL email address, he is just sure "working from home" means you're here   (architecturaldigest.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Hotel, Apartment, remote work, interesting side effects of the pandemic, digital nomads, work schedule, short-term lease, living arrangements  
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1159 clicks; posted to Business » on 02 Dec 2021 at 12:22 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



18 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-12-02 10:59:15 AM  
But I'm at the office!
And here.
 
2021-12-02 12:26:34 PM  
When we had to WFH during the lockdown we were sent a list of activities that are not chargeable. Apparently the boss is afraid that we'll let the dog out on company time.
 
2021-12-02 12:45:35 PM  
I sent my team home at noon on Thursday, March 12, 2020 to work remotely for the next few weeks.  Those weeks turned into months.  It was an IT team, so we knew how to support things remotely and we were committed to having a team coffee break every afternoon for 15-20 minutes to talk about anything that was not work-related.  As the weeks stretched into months, we started noticing different backgrounds in our calls.  No one came out and asked for permission, but people were heading to see family or booking AirBnB's in another town and still getting their work done.  Wife and I did that several times.  We'd find an AirBnB and do a hybrid week -- work 2-3 days and take a long 4 day weekend (vacation days were used).  It helped with sanity.  Her job is now 100% remote.  I've since moved onto a new job that oddly wants everyone to be based in the same city  (dying rust-belt town within a 3 hour drive of nowhere).  I've flown back for a couple of special meetings and found that unless there is not a group meeting, EVERYONE IS WORKING FROM HOME.  I spent an entire day in an empty conference room while my colleagues with whom I work with every day, stayed home rather than come to the office to meet with me.  On the day of my all day meetings, one colleague questioned how it was going to work when we're all back in the office and we're all on calls all day long.   The apparent solution was that they'd have to build out more isolation pod rooms to accommodate.

If you're able to work remote, there should not be any reason for you to ever be forced to return to an office.  They're talking about minimum 2-3 days per week in the office.  That'll kill any ability to get the hell out of town and work remotely which has been a huge perk.

Leaders will see the wisdom of allowing WFH.  Managers will fret about making sure people aren't wasting any time.  I still get more done in 6 hours at home (when I'm not in meetings) than 8 hours in the office.
 
2021-12-02 1:00:22 PM  

Chevello: When we had to WFH during the lockdown we were sent a list of activities that are not chargeable. Apparently the boss is afraid that we'll let the dog out on company time.


We took some of the screens home from the office. Screens that didn't have hdmi inputs.

They refused to let us expense back the cost of like a $7 cable
 
2021-12-02 1:00:59 PM  
If I get my work done, you can STFU.

/working right now
 
2021-12-02 1:04:35 PM  

gorrck: Managers will fret about making sure people aren't wasting any time. I still get more done in 6 hours at home (when I'm not in meetings) than 8 hours in the office.


Managers need to forget about catching time wasters and concentrate on removing obstacles to productivity, so their people can do their best work. Spend your time cutting through corporate bullsh*t and your people will sing your praises.

If you work for a company where your manager monitors your work and tries to catch you walking the dog on company time, find a different place to work.

I have never been more productive (especially since I am an introvert and despise open office plans...now with bonus hot desking!) than over the past (almost) two years.
 
2021-12-02 1:17:25 PM  

Flowery Twats: gorrck: Managers will fret about making sure people aren't wasting any time. I still get more done in 6 hours at home (when I'm not in meetings) than 8 hours in the office.

Managers need to forget about catching time wasters and concentrate on removing obstacles to productivity, so their people can do their best work. Spend your time cutting through corporate bullsh*t and your people will sing your praises.

If you work for a company where your manager monitors your work and tries to catch you walking the dog on company time, find a different place to work.

I have never been more productive (especially since I am an introvert and despise open office plans...now with bonus hot desking!) than over the past (almost) two years.


Funny enough, I'm about to take a WFH job in the company that is literally about that: taking feedback from individuals in the field and turning it into actionable items for corporate teams to remove barriers so that field workers can work more efficiently.
 
2021-12-02 1:17:29 PM  

gorrck: I sent my team home at noon on Thursday, March 12, 2020 to work remotely for the next few weeks.  Those weeks turned into months.  It was an IT team, so we knew how to support things remotely and we were committed to having a team coffee break every afternoon for 15-20 minutes to talk about anything that was not work-related.  As the weeks stretched into months, we started noticing different backgrounds in our calls.  No one came out and asked for permission, but people were heading to see family or booking AirBnB's in another town and still getting their work done.  Wife and I did that several times.  We'd find an AirBnB and do a hybrid week -- work 2-3 days and take a long 4 day weekend (vacation days were used).  It helped with sanity.  Her job is now 100% remote.  I've since moved onto a new job that oddly wants everyone to be based in the same city  (dying rust-belt town within a 3 hour drive of nowhere).  I've flown back for a couple of special meetings and found that unless there is not a group meeting, EVERYONE IS WORKING FROM HOME.  I spent an entire day in an empty conference room while my colleagues with whom I work with every day, stayed home rather than come to the office to meet with me.  On the day of my all day meetings, one colleague questioned how it was going to work when we're all back in the office and we're all on calls all day long.   The apparent solution was that they'd have to build out more isolation pod rooms to accommodate.

If you're able to work remote, there should not be any reason for you to ever be forced to return to an office.  They're talking about minimum 2-3 days per week in the office.  That'll kill any ability to get the hell out of town and work remotely which has been a huge perk.

Leaders will see the wisdom of allowing WFH.  Managers will fret about making sure people aren't wasting any time.  I still get more done in 6 hours at home (when I'm not in meetings) than 8 hours in the office.


But, if you force your workers to commute, you get to take more of your workers time at their expense, leaving them less time to consider their position (and potentially demand adequate leave, with a legit threat of going somewhere else)
 
2021-12-02 1:17:43 PM  
I have a few employees and don't give a shiat what they do as long as the work gets done properly and on schedule.
 
2021-12-02 1:18:27 PM  
Employers want to capture 'savings' that workers achieve. 

Did you figure out how to do your job in 5 hours rather than 8? 

Great. They want to capture your method, and replicate it with someone cheaper if possible.

If they can't, then they want to throw another 4 hour job at you in the hopes you can do it in three hours.

If not, and you have to work an hour extra ... well, they're not paying overtime, are they? 

This is what Marx really meant by the 'means of production' 

What would happen if all jobs could be crushed to 3 hours of attentive work and 5 hours on 'standby' ? 

A lot of people would enjoy their lives, that's what.
 
2021-12-02 1:22:09 PM  
People who think productivity goes down when you work from home are just projecting.  Just because you're a lazy asshole who only works when someone is looking over your shoulder does not mean that I am.
 
2021-12-02 1:24:00 PM  

rubi_con_man: What would happen if all jobs could be crushed to 3 hours of attentive work and 5 hours on 'standby' ?


You've pretty much described my job.  Of course I work in IT and the better I am at my job the less that goes wrong, so the less I actually have to do.  Any time I have to work hard is a failure to do my job correctly.  The trick is to make sure the boss knows this.
 
2021-12-02 1:30:04 PM  

zjoik: gorrck: I sent my team home at noon on Thursday, March 12, 2020 to work remotely for the next few weeks.  Those weeks turned into months.  It was an IT team, so we knew how to support things remotely and we were committed to having a team coffee break every afternoon for 15-20 minutes to talk about anything that was not work-related.  As the weeks stretched into months, we started noticing different backgrounds in our calls.  No one came out and asked for permission, but people were heading to see family or booking AirBnB's in another town and still getting their work done.  Wife and I did that several times.  We'd find an AirBnB and do a hybrid week -- work 2-3 days and take a long 4 day weekend (vacation days were used).  It helped with sanity.  Her job is now 100% remote.  I've since moved onto a new job that oddly wants everyone to be based in the same city  (dying rust-belt town within a 3 hour drive of nowhere).  I've flown back for a couple of special meetings and found that unless there is not a group meeting, EVERYONE IS WORKING FROM HOME.  I spent an entire day in an empty conference room while my colleagues with whom I work with every day, stayed home rather than come to the office to meet with me.  On the day of my all day meetings, one colleague questioned how it was going to work when we're all back in the office and we're all on calls all day long.   The apparent solution was that they'd have to build out more isolation pod rooms to accommodate.

If you're able to work remote, there should not be any reason for you to ever be forced to return to an office.  They're talking about minimum 2-3 days per week in the office.  That'll kill any ability to get the hell out of town and work remotely which has been a huge perk.

Leaders will see the wisdom of allowing WFH.  Managers will fret about making sure people aren't wasting any time.  I still get more done in 6 hours at home (when I'm not in meetings) than 8 hours in the office.

But, if you force your w ...


I'm really starting to believe this is the case.
 
2021-12-02 1:36:10 PM  
On Thanksgiving day 2020 the wife, kids, and I hopped in the car and left Wisconsin for Frisco, CO. Spent the month in a three bedroom duplex with a hot tub, fireplace, and view of Mt Royal from the master suite. The kids did virtual school with me keeping them organized and on track. Wife did work from "home". Our daily routine was not much different than it had been, but after almost never leaving our farm from March 2020 to the day we left, we all needed the change of scenery. We did all of the stuff we had been doing back home, (ordering out, no contact grocery pickup, staying close to home), but we also did a lot of hiking, skiing and just wandering around someplace new. We all needed it psychologically. We came home much refreshed on December 23rd. Though, how could you not when this is the view out your front door every day?
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-12-02 1:37:09 PM  
Saw some survey stats today - c-level's personal work preference before covid, during and their expectation for the future. Unsurprisingly, those who worked 5 days a week in the office before covid will go about as far as o e day a week from home for their subordinates going forward.
 
2021-12-02 1:40:30 PM  

LL316: People who think productivity goes down when you work from home are just projecting.  Just because you're a lazy asshole who only works when someone is looking over your shoulder does not mean that I am.


Not always true. You could have skimped on resources. Made staff use crummy virtual machines where even pressing Alt-Tab takes 2 seconds before the windows appear to be able to move between applications, and where changing the file name on your network drive is a 30 second operation.
 
2021-12-02 4:47:26 PM  
I've been WFH since March 2020. We have a tentative "reopening" scheduled to start in January. Management has already made it perfectly clear that we will not be going back to the way things were. "That ship has sailed" as our division administrator put it in an email to us. They have said at most people would be in the office 3 days a week, and probably not even that much. We've proven that most of the work can be done 90% remote and the few that can't have already been accommodated for and it's gone very smoothly.

The same cannot be said for my wife. Her job eliminated the entire physical office in February 2019 and made them all WFH permanently. So she had been WFH for more than a year when the lockdowns started. Her job, which the home office is based in the midwest, has made it nearly impossible for her to move upwards from her current position in a WFH environment. They say that everyone needs to be in an office. Even with most of their own work force being made remote, they still have the mentality that if she's not physically reporting to an office, she's worthless. Which infuriates her to no end obviously, as she's worked for this company for nearly a decade.  That, compounded with the facts of 1, they closed her office, and 2, everyone else is working remotely just fine.  She's currently applying for positions elsewhere.

I work for a state agency, she works for an insurance company.
 
2021-12-03 3:11:56 AM  

logieal: I've been WFH since March 2020. We have a tentative "reopening" scheduled to start in January. Management has already made it perfectly clear that we will not be going back to the way things were. "That ship has sailed" as our division administrator put it in an email to us. They have said at most people would be in the office 3 days a week, and probably not even that much. We've proven that most of the work can be done 90% remote and the few that can't have already been accommodated for and it's gone very smoothly.

The same cannot be said for my wife. Her job eliminated the entire physical office in February 2019 and made them all WFH permanently. So she had been WFH for more than a year when the lockdowns started. Her job, which the home office is based in the midwest, has made it nearly impossible for her to move upwards from her current position in a WFH environment. They say that everyone needs to be in an office. Even with most of their own work force being made remote, they still have the mentality that if she's not physically reporting to an office, she's worthless. Which infuriates her to no end obviously, as she's worked for this company for nearly a decade.  That, compounded with the facts of 1, they closed her office, and 2, everyone else is working remotely just fine.  She's currently applying for positions elsewhere.

I work for a state agency, she works for an insurance company.


Why the hell would a company want to pay every month for a physical office building when they don't have to?
 
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