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    More: Spiffy, International Space Station, Satellite, leftovers of a damaged satellite, Space debris, countries of different regulations, Elon musk, European countries, low earth orbit  
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968 clicks; posted to STEM » on 01 Dec 2021 at 3:11 PM (24 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



25 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-12-01 11:47:10 AM  
This is cool. Satellite deorbiting devices will likely become a burgeoning part of the satellite industry.
 
2021-12-01 3:21:22 PM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2021-12-01 3:24:13 PM  

beezeltown: This is cool. Satellite deorbiting devices will likely become a burgeoning part of the satellite industry.


Well, whether it's cool or not depends on where the sun shining at any given moment in LEO.   In shade a LEO sat might be < -100 C, but in the direct sun the poor thing may be > +100 C.  The average temp up there may seem pretty pleasant at around 10 degrees C, but ain't no sat really gonna see that.
 
2021-12-01 3:26:31 PM  
goodncold:

you must be in the shade.
 
2021-12-01 3:35:47 PM  
We know the answer to this.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-12-01 3:40:51 PM  

goodncold: [i.pinimg.com image 850x854]


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-12-01 4:01:36 PM  
The low orbit sparkle of drag sattelites
 
2021-12-01 4:16:51 PM  

beezeltown: This is cool. Satellite deorbiting devices will likely become a burgeoning part of the satellite industry.


At an estimated cost of $500 this isn't going to make anyone much money
 
2021-12-01 4:19:33 PM  

LewDux: The low orbit sparkle of drag sattelites


The low spark of high Earth sats?
 
2021-12-01 4:26:14 PM  
I've long dreamt of a giant ball of oobleck used to capture and deorbit such space junk. I'd color it with green food coloring because why not?
 
2021-12-01 4:29:20 PM  

chitownmike: beezeltown: This is cool. Satellite deorbiting devices will likely become a burgeoning part of the satellite industry.

At an estimated cost of $500 this isn't going to make anyone much money


FTFA: "It should sell to a satellite builder for less than $10,000, according to Bevilacqua."

Well, I guess $500 is less than $10k.
 
2021-12-01 4:57:14 PM  
Bevilaqua...

"We're Cool if You're Cool"

/Too obscure?
 
2021-12-01 5:07:23 PM  

chitownmike: beezeltown: This is cool. Satellite deorbiting devices will likely become a burgeoning part of the satellite industry.

At an estimated cost of $500 this isn't going to make anyone much money


Are you assuming that a system that costs the vendor $500 will be sold to the client for that same $500?
 
2021-12-01 5:45:10 PM  
I don't see the market.

Designed for small sats without thrusters that orbit in the higher parts of LEO where there is still enough atmospheric drag to manipulate.

There are thousands of nano and cube sats deployed or being deployed that fit the bill. However, in LEO below 600 miles they do not need this device because drag will pull it down in 5 years. I can't recall any cube sats with periapsis more than 500 miles up but those extremely rare beasts are the only ones that might need it.

Generally speaking satellites going high enough up to need this will already have thrusters for demising and are too big for this to make much difference. Tiny satellites tend to get deployed in much lower (and cheaper) orbits where they don't need this.
 
2021-12-01 5:55:33 PM  

ExYank: I don't see the market.

Designed for small sats without thrusters that orbit in the higher parts of LEO where there is still enough atmospheric drag to manipulate.

There are thousands of nano and cube sats deployed or being deployed that fit the bill. However, in LEO below 600 miles they do not need this device because drag will pull it down in 5 years. I can't recall any cube sats with periapsis more than 500 miles up but those extremely rare beasts are the only ones that might need it.

Generally speaking satellites going high enough up to need this will already have thrusters for demising and are too big for this to make much difference. Tiny satellites tend to get deployed in much lower (and cheaper) orbits where they don't need this.


The point per NASA's request for investigation was as a backup or last-ditch means to de-orbit a sat for the case where the thrusters run out of propellant or otherwise go kaput.
 
2021-12-01 6:20:03 PM  

Randrew: chitownmike: beezeltown: This is cool. Satellite deorbiting devices will likely become a burgeoning part of the satellite industry.

At an estimated cost of $500 this isn't going to make anyone much money

FTFA: "It should sell to a satellite builder for less than $10,000, according to Bevilacqua."

Well, I guess $500 is less than $10k.


Either there was an edit or I don't read to good. Meh
 
2021-12-01 6:54:41 PM  

Randrew: chitownmike: beezeltown: This is cool. Satellite deorbiting devices will likely become a burgeoning part of the satellite industry.

At an estimated cost of $500 this isn't going to make anyone much money

FTFA: "It should sell to a satellite builder for less than $10,000, according to Bevilacqua."

Well, I guess $500 is less than $10k.


There had to have been an edit
 
2021-12-01 8:03:20 PM  
The first shot in WW3, if it comes from a...lower tech nation or individual group, will be to send a shirtload of ball bearings or scrap metal bits into orbit. This will trigger Kessler Syndrome and we can all say goodbye to satellite usage. Russia just tested the idea on a small scale.

It would be better to develop an armored satellite that can collect debris and then de-orbit the debris safely.
 
2021-12-01 8:49:18 PM  

baron von doodle: The first shot in WW3, if it comes from a...lower tech nation or individual group, will be to send a shirtload of ball bearings or scrap metal bits into orbit. This will trigger Kessler Syndrome and we can all say goodbye to satellite usage. Russia just tested the idea on a small scale.

It would be better to develop an armored satellite that can collect debris and then de-orbit the debris safely.


How about a big ass magnet?
 
2021-12-01 9:20:50 PM  
The Georgia Satellites? I'll pass, thanks.
 
2021-12-01 9:42:28 PM  
Another batch of those Starlink satellites are expected to launch from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station at 6:20 Wednesday night.

When did this become a thing?
 
2021-12-02 1:11:17 AM  

chitownmike: baron von doodle: The first shot in WW3, if it comes from a...lower tech nation or individual group, will be to send a shirtload of ball bearings or scrap metal bits into orbit. This will trigger Kessler Syndrome and we can all say goodbye to satellite usage. Russia just tested the idea on a small scale.

It would be better to develop an armored satellite that can collect debris and then de-orbit the debris safely.

How about a big ass magnet?


Most debris will be stuff like aluminum, copper, plastics, etc so a magnet wouldn't be generally effective. Pulling stuff in toward a collecting craft risks those objects colliding with the craft or each other and breaking up further.
 
2021-12-02 8:56:29 AM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: chitownmike: beezeltown: This is cool. Satellite deorbiting devices will likely become a burgeoning part of the satellite industry.

At an estimated cost of $500 this isn't going to make anyone much money

Are you assuming that a system that costs the vendor $500 will be sold to the client for that same $500?


Maybe the company cares about humanity in general and the effect that space junk can have on people as a whole, and sell those at cost because they feel bettering society is more important than profits?
 
2021-12-02 9:01:22 AM  

Randrew: ExYank: I don't see the market.

Designed for small sats without thrusters that orbit in the higher parts of LEO where there is still enough atmospheric drag to manipulate.

There are thousands of nano and cube sats deployed or being deployed that fit the bill. However, in LEO below 600 miles they do not need this device because drag will pull it down in 5 years. I can't recall any cube sats with periapsis more than 500 miles up but those extremely rare beasts are the only ones that might need it.

Generally speaking satellites going high enough up to need this will already have thrusters for demising and are too big for this to make much difference. Tiny satellites tend to get deployed in much lower (and cheaper) orbits where they don't need this.

The point per NASA's request for investigation was as a backup or last-ditch means to de-orbit a sat for the case where the thrusters run out of propellant or otherwise go kaput.


They can always ask the Russians to deorbit a satellite.
 
2021-12-02 10:14:14 AM  

MythDragon: Randrew: ExYank: I don't see the market.

Designed for small sats without thrusters that orbit in the higher parts of LEO where there is still enough atmospheric drag to manipulate.

There are thousands of nano and cube sats deployed or being deployed that fit the bill. However, in LEO below 600 miles they do not need this device because drag will pull it down in 5 years. I can't recall any cube sats with periapsis more than 500 miles up but those extremely rare beasts are the only ones that might need it.

Generally speaking satellites going high enough up to need this will already have thrusters for demising and are too big for this to make much difference. Tiny satellites tend to get deployed in much lower (and cheaper) orbits where they don't need this.

The point per NASA's request for investigation was as a backup or last-ditch means to de-orbit a sat for the case where the thrusters run out of propellant or otherwise go kaput.

They can always ask the Russians to deorbit a satellite.


That's more like providing multiple, simultaneous orbits for a sat and we did it first (?) years ago with the US Navy shooting "down" a dead spy sat with an Aegis missile.
 
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