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(Metro)   "I was made redundant at the tender age of 63, and now to get a job I have to lie about my age on my resume"   (metro.co.uk) divider line
    More: Sad, Employment, Want, Retirement, oldest team member, age mean, older workers, new manager, Old age  
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517 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 30 Nov 2021 at 8:46 AM (25 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



48 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-11-30 6:46:12 AM  
They got me at 60.  63 now.  Replaced by kids who do more things for less money (multi-skilled they call them) and make way more mistakes and bad decisions.  Still talk to a lot of people there.
 
2021-11-30 8:26:24 AM  
First off, don't ever put your age on your resume.  Don't even put things that would date you, like your graduation year or any major job history greater than 20 years ago.

Force them to discriminate late in the game and it's way harder for them to defend it.
 
2021-11-30 9:03:34 AM  

koder: First off, don't ever put your age on your resume.  Don't even put things that would date you, like your graduation year or any major job history greater than 20 years ago.

Force them to discriminate late in the game and it's way harder for them to defend it.


You must not be applying for jobs that have any sort of online application component. Most of the ones I've seen would stop you dead at not entering your graduation year. You'd never make it to the next page.
 
2021-11-30 9:06:27 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-11-30 9:12:23 AM  

koder: First off, don't ever put your age on your resume.  Don't even put things that would date you, like your graduation year or any major job history greater than 20 years ago.

Force them to discriminate late in the game and it's way harder for them to defend it.


Where are you applying that you can just skip those boxes? Any online application is going to force you to fill those in, and I haven't filled out a paper application in at least a decade.
 
2021-11-30 9:13:46 AM  

ltdanman44: [Fark user image 850x268]


Found a "cleaner" copy
https://dilbert.com/strip/2014-01-06
 
2021-11-30 9:17:04 AM  
The "system" is flawed and discriminates against all sorts of groups, not just older individuals. The only reason we talk about age discrimination separately is because an otherwise generic white guy doesn't get to experience the systemic discrimination that harms women, minorities, and others until late in their careers. Time comes for us all.

I'd rather put my energy into battling the systemic discrimination that impacts non-whites and non-men at younger ages, and tack on a statement like "oh, and this applies to older folks, too". But, instead there's a push to just solve age discrimination as it's own thing so that the other types of discrimination can remain. Funny how that happens.
 
2021-11-30 9:17:45 AM  

ltdanman44: [Fark user image 850x268]


There is actually a follow-up one.

vivifychangecatalyst.files.wordpress.comView Full Size
 
2021-11-30 9:19:36 AM  

Bathtub Cynic: koder: First off, don't ever put your age on your resume.  Don't even put things that would date you, like your graduation year or any major job history greater than 20 years ago.

Force them to discriminate late in the game and it's way harder for them to defend it.

Where are you applying that you can just skip those boxes? Any online application is going to force you to fill those in, and I haven't filled out a paper application in at least a decade.



Just lie. Enter whatever year. If they call you out on it, ask why it matters that you graduated in 1988 rather than 2004. Degree is still valid
 
2021-11-30 9:32:20 AM  
Just for Men.  Makes you look smart and young and the HR lady will want you bad.  I mean bite the glasses bad.  She is going to go 35,248 videos of Pornhub on you.

Commercials have taught me more than any school could.
 
2021-11-30 9:34:26 AM  

Merltech: ltdanman44: [Fark user image 850x268]

There is actually a follow-up one.

[vivifychangecatalyst.files.wordpress.com image 640x199]


Holy crap!  That's me.  I knew no one uses SharePoint.
 
2021-11-30 9:37:26 AM  
65 and the bastards. won't. fire. me.
keep giving me raises.

bastards.
 
2021-11-30 9:45:46 AM  

Koodz: koder: First off, don't ever put your age on your resume.  Don't even put things that would date you, like your graduation year or any major job history greater than 20 years ago.

Force them to discriminate late in the game and it's way harder for them to defend it.

You must not be applying for jobs that have any sort of online application component. Most of the ones I've seen would stop you dead at not entering your graduation year. You'd never make it to the next page.


Bathtub Cynic: koder: First off, don't ever put your age on your resume.  Don't even put things that would date you, like your graduation year or any major job history greater than 20 years ago.

Force them to discriminate late in the game and it's way harder for them to defend it.

Where are you applying that you can just skip those boxes? Any online application is going to force you to fill those in, and I haven't filled out a paper application in at least a decade.


I haven't had to fill out a single online job application my entire career (ironic; I'm a software developer; username checks out).  The closest thing have been post-hiring background checks, and that's just signing consent for it.  Also never had to take a drug test.

I'd honestly say--that is, if it's even possible for you in your field/career--avoid any place that makes you waste your time upfront like that.  It's likely going to treat you as expendable anyway.  Find a company that either uses recruiters or interviews first and then makes you do any/all red tape when you actually need to.
 
2021-11-30 10:27:08 AM  
I just turned 63, so I'm getting a kick...

/ Spreadsheets on all three monitors
// Legacy skills for the win
/// Slashies!
 
2021-11-30 10:33:48 AM  

vudukungfu: 65 and the bastards. won't. fire. me.
keep giving me raises.

bastards.


Braggart.
The only way I get a bump is to change employers.  Haven't had paid time off in 6 years - not even holidays.
 
2021-11-30 10:41:03 AM  

koder: Koodz: koder: First off, don't ever put your age on your resume.  Don't even put things that would date you, like your graduation year or any major job history greater than 20 years ago.

Force them to discriminate late in the game and it's way harder for them to defend it.

You must not be applying for jobs that have any sort of online application component. Most of the ones I've seen would stop you dead at not entering your graduation year. You'd never make it to the next page.

Bathtub Cynic: koder: First off, don't ever put your age on your resume.  Don't even put things that would date you, like your graduation year or any major job history greater than 20 years ago.

Force them to discriminate late in the game and it's way harder for them to defend it.

Where are you applying that you can just skip those boxes? Any online application is going to force you to fill those in, and I haven't filled out a paper application in at least a decade.

I haven't had to fill out a single online job application my entire career (ironic; I'm a software developer; username checks out).  The closest thing have been post-hiring background checks, and that's just signing consent for it.  Also never had to take a drug test.

I'd honestly say--that is, if it's even possible for you in your field/career--avoid any place that makes you waste your time upfront like that.  It's likely going to treat you as expendable anyway.  Find a company that either uses recruiters or interviews first and then makes you do any/all red tape when you actually need to.


I will say the two jobs I've actually been offered in my field were both jobs in which I got the offer before filling out the application, but I've still filled out dozens of applications, and they all start by poorly parsing my resume, then having me go in and correct all the shiat they got wrong, including date ranges for old jobs and education.

At this point I'd settle for a call from a recruiter outside the Confederacy. North Carolina sucks, but all the calls I get want me to go to Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, or Texas, all of which are worse.
 
2021-11-30 10:49:59 AM  

rideaurocks: Bathtub Cynic: koder: First off, don't ever put your age on your resume.  Don't even put things that would date you, like your graduation year or any major job history greater than 20 years ago.

Force them to discriminate late in the game and it's way harder for them to defend it.

Where are you applying that you can just skip those boxes? Any online application is going to force you to fill those in, and I haven't filled out a paper application in at least a decade.


Just lie. Enter whatever year. If they call you out on it, ask why it matters that you graduated in 1988 rather than 2004. Degree is still valid


With my luck, I would be interviewed with the same degree who graduated from the same college in 2004.
 
2021-11-30 10:57:29 AM  

roostercube: The "system" is flawed and discriminates against all sorts of groups, not just older individuals. The only reason we talk about age discrimination separately is because an otherwise generic white guy doesn't get to experience the systemic discrimination that harms women, minorities, and others until late in their careers. Time comes for us all.

I'd rather put my energy into battling the systemic discrimination that impacts non-whites and non-men at younger ages, and tack on a statement like "oh, and this applies to older folks, too". But, instead there's a push to just solve age discrimination as it's own thing so that the other types of discrimination can remain. Funny how that happens.


Older people have to f****** eat too. You'll be there someday I hope you get every f****** experience to enjoy the same treatment as this letter writer.
 
2021-11-30 10:58:00 AM  
This article makes me sad.  There's so much more to living than work.  I have a good job, I like my coworkers, and I get job satisfaction, but the only thing that will keep me here past social security eligibility will be if my retirement completely shiats itself or if they move me to a ridiculously high paying position I can do mostly remote.

I hate quoting movies for real life scenarios, but this one rings very true.  No amount of money ever bought a second of time.
 
2021-11-30 10:59:30 AM  

roostercube: The "system" is flawed and discriminates against all sorts of groups, not just older individuals. The only reason we talk about age discrimination separately is because an otherwise generic white guy doesn't get to experience the systemic discrimination that harms women, minorities, and others until late in their careers. Time comes for us all.

I'd rather put my energy into battling the systemic discrimination that impacts non-whites and non-men at younger ages, and tack on a statement like "oh, and this applies to older folks, too". But, instead there's a push to just solve age discrimination as it's own thing so that the other types of discrimination can remain. Funny how that happens.


Could you do us all a quick favor and leave this website.

I don't mind hearing other people opinions even if drastically differ from my own, but you speak nothing but racist and sexist remarks.
 
2021-11-30 11:01:36 AM  

Koodz: koder: Koodz: koder: First off, don't ever put your age on your resume.  Don't even put things that would date you, like your graduation year or any major job history greater than 20 years ago.

Force them to discriminate late in the game and it's way harder for them to defend it.

You must not be applying for jobs that have any sort of online application component. Most of the ones I've seen would stop you dead at not entering your graduation year. You'd never make it to the next page.

Bathtub Cynic: koder: First off, don't ever put your age on your resume.  Don't even put things that would date you, like your graduation year or any major job history greater than 20 years ago.

Force them to discriminate late in the game and it's way harder for them to defend it.

Where are you applying that you can just skip those boxes? Any online application is going to force you to fill those in, and I haven't filled out a paper application in at least a decade.

I haven't had to fill out a single online job application my entire career (ironic; I'm a software developer; username checks out).  The closest thing have been post-hiring background checks, and that's just signing consent for it.  Also never had to take a drug test.

I'd honestly say--that is, if it's even possible for you in your field/career--avoid any place that makes you waste your time upfront like that.  It's likely going to treat you as expendable anyway.  Find a company that either uses recruiters or interviews first and then makes you do any/all red tape when you actually need to.

I will say the two jobs I've actually been offered in my field were both jobs in which I got the offer before filling out the application, but I've still filled out dozens of applications, and they all start by poorly parsing my resume, then having me go in and correct all the shiat they got wrong, including date ranges for old jobs and education.

At this point I'd settle for a call from a recruiter outside the Confederacy. Nort ...


Eh, if you can ignore the Clowns in the Legislative Circus, Atlanta isn't bad. I'd take it over any of the Midwest. 

/ Indy sucks
 
2021-11-30 11:11:13 AM  

offacue: They got me at 60.  63 now.  Replaced by kids who do more things for less money (multi-skilled they call them) and make way more mistakes and bad decisions.  Still talk to a lot of people there.


Cross-trained, they call it.  That means that you have to run the whole show.  I mean other people are supposed to be there, but if not, it's all yours.  It's more "efficient."
I have worked with the kids most of my life.  Good jobs, shiatty jobs.  I can't wait to quit forever, and luckily, it won't be long. I hate our work culture viciously.  Ever since the computers took over, it has sucked immensely.  Everyone is expected to be a computer nerd, a customer service person, a cleaner, answer the phones, and deal with whatever comes up.  And it could be anything, because advertising is done at warp speed now, and everyone expects that if they push some little buttons, that shiat is just there like magic.
I have a job now doing as little as possible....and I intend to quit it.  I could be dead in 10 years.  I'm going hiking.  I'm tired of doing pointless bullshiat so that somebody else can get rich.
 
2021-11-30 11:21:27 AM  

roostercube: The "system" is flawed and discriminates against all sorts of groups, not just older individuals. The only reason we talk about age discrimination separately is because an otherwise generic white guy doesn't get to experience the systemic discrimination that harms women, minorities, and others until late in their careers. Time comes for us all.

I'd rather put my energy into battling the systemic discrimination that impacts non-whites and non-men at younger ages, and tack on a statement like "oh, and this applies to older folks, too". But, instead there's a push to just solve age discrimination as it's own thing so that the other types of discrimination can remain. Funny how that happens.


And what happens as minority female computer folks get older? You don't care because you are interested in one specific thing yourself. Perhaps we could fight discrimination as we fight discrimination.
 
2021-11-30 11:22:05 AM  

dionysusaur: vudukungfu: 65 and the bastards. won't. fire. me.
keep giving me raises.

bastards.

Braggart.
The only way I get a bump is to change employers.  Haven't had paid time off in 6 years - not even holidays.


and they make me work from home, too.
plus.... (the horror) dental
 
2021-11-30 11:26:05 AM  

Merltech: ltdanman44: [Fark user image 850x268]

There is actually a follow-up one.

[vivifychangecatalyst.files.wordpress.com image 640x199]


Mike Judge approved.
 
2021-11-30 11:27:36 AM  

roostercube: The "system" is flawed and discriminates against all sorts of groups, not just older individuals. The only reason we talk about age discrimination separately is because an otherwise generic white guy doesn't get to experience the systemic discrimination that harms women, minorities, and others until late in their careers. Time comes for us all.

I'd rather put my energy into battling the systemic discrimination that impacts non-whites and non-men at younger ages, and tack on a statement like "oh, and this applies to older folks, too". But, instead there's a push to just solve age discrimination as it's own thing so that the other types of discrimination can remain. Funny how that happens.


You must get more ass at that community college than a toilet seat.
 
2021-11-30 11:30:39 AM  
I just turned 64.  I'm one of those guys who maintains a lot of legacy processes that are slowly being converted.  I've also been working this type of job for a long time, so I (and a couple of other old folks) are the living memory base of what / why / when certain things happened and why certain decisions were made.

My time at this job is coming to an end, and I doubt that I'll be able to find another one. I have friends who are in the same boat.  Loads of experience and skills, but too old, too expensive, and not worth hiring for only a limited number of years.

I just hope that I can hold on for one more year so that I can qualify for Medicare.  If they don't get all of my tasks converted, I can probably continue part-time for a while, but not full-time.

Have cash / investments that will let me live comfortably until I can start my full draw from Social Security at age 66 1/2.
 
2021-11-30 11:51:10 AM  

Hugh Manatee: I just turned 64.  I'm one of those guys who maintains a lot of legacy processes that are slowly being converted.  I've also been working this type of job for a long time, so I (and a couple of other old folks) are the living memory base of what / why / when certain things happened and why certain decisions were made.

My time at this job is coming to an end, and I doubt that I'll be able to find another one. I have friends who are in the same boat.  Loads of experience and skills, but too old, too expensive, and not worth hiring for only a limited number of years.

I just hope that I can hold on for one more year so that I can qualify for Medicare.  If they don't get all of my tasks converted, I can probably continue part-time for a while, but not full-time.

Have cash / investments that will let me live comfortably until I can start my full draw from Social Security at age 66 1/2.


I'm in the same boat about 5 years sooner than you.  We start training our replacements in January. At least I'll be able start drawing out of 401k soon.  I think I'll buy an RV and travel the country in my next chapter as a picker/wheeler-dealer/gigolo/consultant.
 
2021-11-30 12:11:02 PM  

Another Government Employee: / Indy sucks


Yes it does.  Looking to leave the minute the kud is laubched.
 
2021-11-30 12:11:22 PM  
dionysusaur:

*launched*
 
2021-11-30 12:23:46 PM  
One word: Contracting

Short-term jobs are where they are usually more interested in solving their near-term problem and less interested in your personal demographics.  Figure out what your marketable skills are and rework your resume accordingly.  There's a zillion job sites out there so it's easy to do market research on what's needed and how you can market yourself as a solution.

I'm 66 and primarily look for Excel development or support jobs.  I have a nuclear engineering degree so I've got lots of analytical experience and no one has ever challenged my math skills.  I've worked in variety of industries and disciplines, but mostly financial in nature.  Jobs have ranged from a week to almost two years.  I've converted to permanent status once.  For the last 30 years, it's contract jobs for a while and then a perm job comes along for 5-7 years.  When that goes away, straight back to contracting.  Currently working as a contractor but I'm an employee of the contracting company, with full benefits, including a bonus coming in a couple of weeks.  Best of both worlds.

Find your niche and be flexible.  Being fearless doesn't hurt either.  I've taken on a number of jobs that others won't touch.  It is rewarding?  At times.  Does it keep a roof over my head and the wine cellar stocked.  It sure does!
 
2021-11-30 12:26:09 PM  

Hugh Manatee: I just turned 64.  I'm one of those guys who maintains a lot of legacy processes that are slowly being converted.  I've also been working this type of job for a long time, so I (and a couple of other old folks) are the living memory base of what / why / when certain things happened and why certain decisions were made.

My time at this job is coming to an end, and I doubt that I'll be able to find another one. I have friends who are in the same boat.  Loads of experience and skills, but too old, too expensive, and not worth hiring for only a limited number of years.

I just hope that I can hold on for one more year so that I can qualify for Medicare.  If they don't get all of my tasks converted, I can probably continue part-time for a while, but not full-time.

Have cash / investments that will let me live comfortably until I can start my full draw from Social Security at age 66 1/2.


I'm in a similar spot. The project I'm currently working on is going to make a lot of my knowledge obsolete. It will finish up the same time that I turn 65. At that point, I don't know if I will still have a job or not.  I won't reach full retirement age for another year and a half. No idea if they'll put me out to pasture before then. I just hope to keep working until I can get my youngest kid out the door.  She's special needs so she's a little behind on the timeline for becoming self-sufficient.
 
2021-11-30 12:31:07 PM  
Today is technically my last day of work: I was sneaky and got them to schedule me for two weeks' worth of holidays/vacation, then put in the two week's notice that I'm retired at 4:55 PM on the last day before vacation began. I'm 60, and did the same job for over three decades. I'm very lucky that I have a decent old-fashioned pension (thanks, AFSCME!) with full medical, and enough money coming back from deferred comp and investments, etc. that I didn't have to keep working until full eligibility for Social Security at 65. Once Social Security begins, on top of the pension I'll actually be making slightly more per year than I did, the week I retired. So I win. It's not "fark you"-level money, but I don't have to check my bank balance before indulging in a donut or anything, either.

I was able to get there by not living a very exciting life; not buying a new car every two years,  not taking lots of vacation trips, or buying  expensive man toys, etc. but now I have a paid off mortgage and car, a year's pay in the bank, and steady income coming in... because I made choices thirty years ago to be ready by this age. I could have kept working another three years and planned to, then the accountant said I didn't really need to any more, and would actually end up losing money if I kept working longer. So I pulled the yellow handle.  My son has watched me and has started the same savings and deferred comp plans I did, but at an even earlier age, and if his investment program works out like mine, he'll do better than me and finish his working years sooner than me. And I'll be delighted.

The job got plenty tough the last three years. That Dilbert cartoon up-thread about "banishment rooms"? That happened to me this year. The boss hated me, I mean to cartoon levels of hate. But they couldn't just fire me: I was protected by the union and the boss couldn't come up with reasons to fire me for cause. So she tried to "manage me out", meaning, make my life miserable enough I wanted to quit. She started by adding ungainly restrictions to my procedures and processes to complicate my work unnecessarily, moving me out of a nice office and into a desk in a hallway, then restricting access to my best tools, then declaring war on all my client accounts. The clients I'd cultured and developed great relationships with, suddenly found themselves re-assigned to another guy in the shop, and they were not happy about it, but the boss told them: "IDGAF, I make the assignments here, not you customers."

Sure enough, the new guy on the accounts didn't do anything the way the clients liked or were used to, boss didn't care. She was literally turning away and driving off business, just to spite me. She'd assign new, low-status (by her reckoning) clients to me, folks she had to service, but didn't care how poorly they were serviced. She expected they'd get a minimal effort and split. She didn't understand my super power which was to treat every client like the most important one, and give each one my best effort. Plus, I just have an easy way with clients, especially new, inexperienced ones that count on me having the expertise to realize their vision, and prevent bad decisions. These "shiat tier" clients all fast became steady customers and continually praised me in customer satisfaction evaluations.  And thank God for those objective outside evaluations, because come my annual review, the boss would make shiat up out of whole cloth about how clients didn't like me, and all I had to do was call up these customer reviews to prove she was a liar.  So, since I could make any client a star client, she decided I just wouldn't have ANY clients. She assigned every new client of mine to this one other guy in the shop, who became really stressed-out because before, the two of us had been doing the work of three already.  Now he had all his clients, my old clients, and the new clients (who kept asking for me over and over, saying: "we really liked what Mr. Pie did for us, don't know why we can't have him again, can you do this the same way he would?" And the guy handling my stuff didn't know how I do the job, didn't even use the same tools, so, his attempts to copy my style always fell flat. Not his fault, and I don't hate the guy. He's just not me, and I'm just better at the particular job.    The boss had to keep lying to clients that I wasn't available to them, when they could see me in the hallways every day, and ask me what I was doing, and I'd say: "nothing, just waiting until I can work with you again."  But she still had to pay me for showing up.

So she cooked up a project to banish me to: hand-processing a tape library archive of well over eight thousand individual tapes that had to be entered by hand into a spreadsheet, before they were to be destroyed, without transfer to digital form, by her order.  So every day, I'd have to walk past the rest of the crew making new projects and plop down in a windowless cave to enter spreadsheet data all day. This was a triple-win for her: the tapes were full of three decades' worth of my work product, and destroying each one was like symbolically killing off a tiny piece of me. Didn't matter to her the tapes were full of collective organizational memory and material of use to future historians. It kept me from clients of any sort, and it isolated me from the office "family" too. Picture the warehouse from "Raiders Of the Lost Ark" and that's my "banishment room."

But she underestimated my capacity to self-entertain in such a boring, non-creative space. And she never caught on that she'd given me the right circumstances and cover to duplicate and save off all the best material she was intending to destroy to piss me off. So I brought in my own portable drive and hoovered-up all the good stuff anyway, a little bit, every day. It was public domain material after all, but I knew if I just openly asked for the opportunity to make those copies, she'd deny it and fight a pointless FOIA request war in court until my clock ran out. For hate's sake. So I ran the duplications as a background process every day while doing my assigned work, and I'd got 99 percent of what I wanted to save by the last day I worked. Not much of a "caper", but it felt good to be a gangster.

Which brings me back to today. My last day. I have to drop off my keycard, keys, and phone, along with my response to her last annual evaluation of my performance.

There's a rebuttal section for the employee on the form.

It all gets read by her brand-new boss and the director of the agency has to read and sign-off on it.

You had better believe I've filled that section with every true yet embarrassing thing about my boss I've held back for a few years. Her bosses are going to know what and who she is. Up to them what they do about her after that. But it's becoming less important to me by the minute, because I'm farking free of it all, with nothing but good times and joy ahead of me.
 
2021-11-30 12:32:49 PM  

Great_Milenko: I hate quoting movies for real life scenarios, but this one rings very true.  No amount of money ever bought a second of time.


Hafele-Keating Experiment
 
2021-11-30 12:38:15 PM  

Any Pie Left: Today is technically my last day of work: I was sneaky and got them to schedule me for two weeks' worth of holidays/vacation, then put in the two week's notice that I'm retired at 4:55 PM on the last day before vacation began. I'm 60, and did the same job for over three decades. I'm very lucky that I have a decent old-fashioned pension (thanks, AFSCME!) with full medical, and enough money coming back from deferred comp and investments, etc. that I didn't have to keep working until full eligibility for Social Security at 65. Once Social Security begins, on top of the pension I'll actually be making slightly more per year than I did, the week I retired. So I win. It's not "fark you"-level money, but I don't have to check my bank balance before indulging in a donut or anything, either.

I was able to get there by not living a very exciting life; not buying a new car every two years,  not taking lots of vacation trips, or buying  expensive man toys, etc. but now I have a paid off mortgage and car, a year's pay in the bank, and steady income coming in... because I made choices thirty years ago to be ready by this age. I could have kept working another three years and planned to, then the accountant said I didn't really need to any more, and would actually end up losing money if I kept working longer. So I pulled the yellow handle.  My son has watched me and has started the same savings and deferred comp plans I did, but at an even earlier age, and if his investment program works out like mine, he'll do better than me and finish his working years sooner than me. And I'll be delighted.

The job got plenty tough the last three years. That Dilbert cartoon up-thread about "banishment rooms"? That happened to me this year. The boss hated me, I mean to cartoon levels of hate. But they couldn't just fire me: I was protected by the union and the boss couldn't come up with reasons to fire me for cause. So she tried to "manage me out", meaning, make my life miserable enough I wanted to quit. She started by adding ungainly restrictions to my procedures and processes to complicate my work unnecessarily, moving me out of a nice office and into a desk in a hallway, then restricting access to my best tools, then declaring war on all my client accounts. The clients I'd cultured and developed great relationships with, suddenly found themselves re-assigned to another guy in the shop, and they were not happy about it, but the boss told them: "IDGAF, I make the assignments here, not you customers."

Sure enough, the new guy on the accounts didn't do anything the way the clients liked or were used to, boss didn't care. She was literally turning away and driving off business, just to spite me. She'd assign new, low-status (by her reckoning) clients to me, folks she had to service, but didn't care how poorly they were serviced. She expected they'd get a minimal effort and split. She didn't understand my super power which was to treat every client like the most important one, and give each one my best effort. Plus, I just have an easy way with clients, especially new, inexperienced ones that count on me having the expertise to realize their vision, and prevent bad decisions. These "shiat tier" clients all fast became steady customers and continually praised me in customer satisfaction evaluations.  And thank God for those objective outside evaluations, because come my annual review, the boss would make shiat up out of whole cloth about how clients didn't like me, and all I had to do was call up these customer reviews to prove she was a liar.  So, since I could make any client a star client, she decided I just wouldn't have ANY clients. She assigned every new client of mine to this one other guy in the shop, who became really stressed-out because before, the two of us had been doing the work of three already.  Now he had all his clients, my old clients, and the new clients (who kept asking for me over and over, saying: "we really liked what Mr. Pie did for us, don't know why we can't have him again, can you do this the same way he would?" And the guy handling my stuff didn't know how I do the job, didn't even use the same tools, so, his attempts to copy my style always fell flat. Not his fault, and I don't hate the guy. He's just not me, and I'm just better at the particular job.    The boss had to keep lying to clients that I wasn't available to them, when they could see me in the hallways every day, and ask me what I was doing, and I'd say: "nothing, just waiting until I can work with you again."  But she still had to pay me for showing up.

So she cooked up a project to banish me to: hand-processing a tape library archive of well over eight thousand individual tapes that had to be entered by hand into a spreadsheet, before they were to be destroyed, without transfer to digital form, by her order.  So every day, I'd have to walk past the rest of the crew making new projects and plop down in a windowless cave to enter spreadsheet data all day. This was a triple-win for her: the tapes were full of three decades' worth of my work product, and destroying each one was like symbolically killing off a tiny piece of me. Didn't matter to her the tapes were full of collective organizational memory and material of use to future historians. It kept me from clients of any sort, and it isolated me from the office "family" too. Picture the warehouse from "Raiders Of the Lost Ark" and that's my "banishment room."

But she underestimated my capacity to self-entertain in such a boring, non-creative space. And she never caught on that she'd given me the right circumstances and cover to duplicate and save off all the best material she was intending to destroy to piss me off. So I brought in my own portable drive and hoovered-up all the good stuff anyway, a little bit, every day. It was public domain material after all, but I knew if I just openly asked for the opportunity to make those copies, she'd deny it and fight a pointless FOIA request war in court until my clock ran out. For hate's sake. So I ran the duplications as a background process every day while doing my assigned work, and I'd got 99 percent of what I wanted to save by the last day I worked. Not much of a "caper", but it felt good to be a gangster.

Which brings me back to today. My last day. I have to drop off my keycard, keys, and phone, along with my response to her last annual evaluation of my performance.

There's a rebuttal section for the employee on the form.

It all gets read by her brand-new boss and the director of the agency has to read and sign-off on it.

You had better believe I've filled that section with every true yet embarrassing thing about my boss I've held back for a few years. Her bosses are going to know what and who she is. Up to them what they do about her after that. But it's becoming less important to me by the minute, because I'm farking free of it all, with nothing but good times and joy ahead of me.


I regret that I have but one smart to give you. Congratulations, you've earned it.
 
2021-11-30 12:40:04 PM  

Any Pie Left: Today is technically my last day of work: I was sneaky and got them to schedule me for two weeks' worth of holidays/vacation, then put in the two week's notice that I'm retired at 4:55 PM on the last day before vacation began. I'm 60, and did the same job for over three decades. I'm very lucky that I have a decent old-fashioned pension (thanks, AFSCME!) with full medical, and enough money coming back from deferred comp and investments, etc. that I didn't have to keep working until full eligibility for Social Security at 65. Once Social Security begins, on top of the pension I'll actually be making slightly more per year than I did, the week I retired. So I win. It's not "fark you"-level money, but I don't have to check my bank balance before indulging in a donut or anything, either.

I was able to get there by not living a very exciting life; not buying a new car every two years,  not taking lots of vacation trips, or buying  expensive man toys, etc. but now I have a paid off mortgage and car, a year's pay in the bank, and steady income coming in... because I made choices thirty years ago to be ready by this age. I could have kept working another three years and planned to, then the accountant said I didn't really need to any more, and would actually end up losing money if I kept working longer. So I pulled the yellow handle.  My son has watched me and has started the same savings and deferred comp plans I did, but at an even earlier age, and if his investment program works out like mine, he'll do better than me and finish his working years sooner than me. And I'll be delighted.

The job got plenty tough the last three years. That Dilbert cartoon up-thread about "banishment rooms"? That happened to me this year. The boss hated me, I mean to cartoon levels of hate. But they couldn't just fire me: I was protected by the union and the boss couldn't come up with reasons to fire me for cause. So she tried to "manage me out", meaning, make my life miserable enough I wante ...


If you're 60, you won't  reach full eligibility for Social Security until you're 67. They changed the rules. I hope that doesn't torpedo your plans.
 
2021-11-30 12:50:36 PM  

roostercube: The "system" is flawed and discriminates against all sorts of groups, not just older individuals. The only reason we talk about age discrimination separately is because an otherwise generic white guy doesn't get to experience the systemic discrimination that harms women, minorities, and others until late in their careers. Time comes for us all.

I'd rather put my energy into battling the systemic discrimination that impacts non-whites and non-men at younger ages, and tack on a statement like "oh, and this applies to older folks, too". But, instead there's a push to just solve age discrimination as it's own thing so that the other types of discrimination can remain. Funny how that happens.


Here we go with the usual BS that men don't get discriminated against. I have a gender-neutral first name, so I got called into two different interviews where they were determined to hire a woman. In the first one, the woman told me to my face that she wasn't having a man in her department. In the second case, I got the job anyway because no qualified women applied.
 
2021-11-30 2:08:14 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-11-30 2:23:21 PM  
Nah, waiting until 67 won't hurt me on the Social Security. Like I said, I'm diversified, the pension is rock solid, wife also has pension and So Sec, so even if we tap the benefits earlier, for lesser monthly amounts, we're good. And the house I bought for cash and own outright is down-sized and cheaper to run, in a lower-tax area near the lake, convenient for shlepping my sailboat to and from. (crossed fingers) Outside of a major health catastrophe, I'm in good shape, and even with a health crisis, my work-provided health benefits are better than average, continuing beyond my death and covering my wife as well.  I feel like I won the lottery, and I'm not humble-bragging here; this is jus how things are supposed to go, in a world where labor is treated right. It's what I wish for everybody. And one reason unions are so important.
 
2021-11-30 3:02:58 PM  

Any Pie Left: Today is technically my last day of work: I was sneaky and got them to schedule me for two weeks' worth of holidays/vacation, then put in the two week's notice that I'm retired at 4:55 PM on the last day before vacation began. I'm 60, and did the same job for over three decades. I'm very lucky that I have a decent old-fashioned pension (thanks, AFSCME!) with full medical, and enough money coming back from deferred comp and investments, etc. that I didn't have to keep working until full eligibility for Social Security at 65. Once Social Security begins, on top of the pension I'll actually be making slightly more per year than I did, the week I retired. So I win. It's not "fark you"-level money, but I don't have to check my bank balance before indulging in a donut or anything, either.

I was able to get there by not living a very exciting life; not buying a new car every two years,  not taking lots of vacation trips, or buying  expensive man toys, etc. but now I have a paid off mortgage and car, a year's pay in the bank, and steady income coming in... because I made choices thirty years ago to be ready by this age. I could have kept working another three years and planned to, then the accountant said I didn't really need to any more, and would actually end up losing money if I kept working longer. So I pulled the yellow handle.  My son has watched me and has started the same savings and deferred comp plans I did, but at an even earlier age, and if his investment program works out like mine, he'll do better than me and finish his working years sooner than me. And I'll be delighted.

The job got plenty tough the last three years. That Dilbert cartoon up-thread about "banishment rooms"? That happened to me this year. The boss hated me, I mean to cartoon levels of hate. But they couldn't just fire me: I was protected by the union and the boss couldn't come up with reasons to fire me for cause. So she tried to "manage me out", meaning, make my life miserable enough I wante ...


Sir, this is a step - by - step instructional on how to win.  Congratulations.
 
2021-11-30 3:11:54 PM  

Madstand: Any Pie Left: Today is technically my last day of work: I was sneaky and got them to schedule me for two weeks' worth of holidays/vacation, then put in the two week's notice that I'm retired at 4:55 PM on the last day before vacation began. I'm 60, and did the same job for over three decades. I'm very lucky that I have a decent old-fashioned pension (thanks, AFSCME!) with full medical, and enough money coming back from deferred comp and investments, etc. that I didn't have to keep working until full eligibility for Social Security at 65. Once Social Security begins, on top of the pension I'll actually be making slightly more per year than I did, the week I retired. So I win. It's not "fark you"-level money, but I don't have to check my bank balance before indulging in a donut or anything, either.

I was able to get there by not living a very exciting life; not buying a new car every two years,  not taking lots of vacation trips, or buying  expensive man toys, etc. but now I have a paid off mortgage and car, a year's pay in the bank, and steady income coming in... because I made choices thirty years ago to be ready by this age. I could have kept working another three years and planned to, then the accountant said I didn't really need to any more, and would actually end up losing money if I kept working longer. So I pulled the yellow handle.  My son has watched me and has started the same savings and deferred comp plans I did, but at an even earlier age, and if his investment program works out like mine, he'll do better than me and finish his working years sooner than me. And I'll be delighted.

The job got plenty tough the last three years. That Dilbert cartoon up-thread about "banishment rooms"? That happened to me this year. The boss hated me, I mean to cartoon levels of hate. But they couldn't just fire me: I was protected by the union and the boss couldn't come up with reasons to fire me for cause. So she tried to "manage me out", meaning, make my life miserable ...


No, it shows how racist he is:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-11-30 3:23:28 PM  

BeotchPudding: Madstand: Any Pie Left: Today is technically my last day of work: I was sneaky and got them to schedule me for two weeks' worth of holidays/vacation, then put in the two week's notice that I'm retired at 4:55 PM on the last day before vacation began. I'm 60, and did the same job for over three decades. I'm very lucky that I have a decent old-fashioned pension (thanks, AFSCME!) with full medical, and enough money coming back from deferred comp and investments, etc. that I didn't have to keep working until full eligibility for Social Security at 65. Once Social Security begins, on top of the pension I'll actually be making slightly more per year than I did, the week I retired. So I win. It's not "fark you"-level money, but I don't have to check my bank balance before indulging in a donut or anything, either.

I was able to get there by not living a very exciting life; not buying a new car every two years,  not taking lots of vacation trips, or buying  expensive man toys, etc. but now I have a paid off mortgage and car, a year's pay in the bank, and steady income coming in... because I made choices thirty years ago to be ready by this age. I could have kept working another three years and planned to, then the accountant said I didn't really need to any more, and would actually end up losing money if I kept working longer. So I pulled the yellow handle.  My son has watched me and has started the same savings and deferred comp plans I did, but at an even earlier age, and if his investment program works out like mine, he'll do better than me and finish his working years sooner than me. And I'll be delighted.

The job got plenty tough the last three years. That Dilbert cartoon up-thread about "banishment rooms"? That happened to me this year. The boss hated me, I mean to cartoon levels of hate. But they couldn't just fire me: I was protected by the union and the boss couldn't come up with reasons to fire me for cause. So she tried to "manage me out", meaning, make my life ...


You would prefer him to crumple up and use the Proletariat Victim Card?
 
2021-11-30 3:25:41 PM  
Honestly at the age she was when she was let go  she should have known she at beast faced an up hill struggle to get another job in what ever industry she was in.

I do feel she was unjustly fired but also it is clear their is jack all she could legally do about it.   The sad and unfair fact is older employees despite years of experience and irreplaceable knowledge  are increasingly being seen by accountants and top execs as liabilities due to the high salaries they have ( which they have fairly earned ) and they desire to replace them with younger and cheaper employees and so earn more bonuses for themselves as they bump the company stock price.
 
2021-11-30 5:26:20 PM  

Gramma: I'm in a similar spot. The project I'm currently working on is going to make a lot of my knowledge obsolete. It will finish up the same time that I turn 65. At that point, I don't know if I will still have a job or not.  I won't reach full retirement age for another year and a half. No idea if they'll put me out to pasture before then. I just hope to keep working until I can get my youngest kid out the door.  She's special needs so she's a little behind on the timeline for becoming self-sufficient.


Dude, you can get Medicare so take early retirement.

Shaving 18 months off of the full retirement benefit will cost you 2-3 hundred a month (however you will be receiving 18 months more since you will retire early). I'll be retiring the moment that Medicare kicks in. Hell, if Single Payer comes along I'll retire at 62.
 
2021-11-30 5:35:51 PM  

Gramma: If you're 60, you won't  reach full eligibility for Social Security until you're 67. They changed the rules. I hope that doesn't torpedo your plans.


As I mentioned above - it isn't that big of a hit. These are the options for me.

Age           Monthly SS         Annual SS
62             1,819                  21,828
63             1,948                  23,376
64             2,088                  25,056
65             2,273                  27,276
66             2,458                  29,496
67             2,646                  31,752
68             2,745                  32,940

Retiring at age 62 will knock about $10k off of my full annual benefit that I will reach at 67. Big farking deal. You may lose $10/yr, but you get over $100k before you turn 67. I don't know about the rest of you. but getting to enjoy life for five years in your early-mid 60s if worth every penny.

The only problem with retiring early is paying for healthcare before you reach Medicare eligibility.
 
2021-11-30 8:20:36 PM  

BeotchPudding: Madstand: Any Pie Left: Today is technically my last day of work: I was sneaky and got them to schedule me for two weeks' worth of holidays/vacation, then put in the two week's notice that I'm retired at 4:55 PM on the last day before vacation began. I'm 60, and did the same job for over three decades. I'm very lucky that I have a decent old-fashioned pension (thanks, AFSCME!) with full medical, and enough money coming back from deferred comp and investments, etc. that I didn't have to keep working until full eligibility for Social Security at 65. Once Social Security begins, on top of the pension I'll actually be making slightly more per year than I did, the week I retired. So I win. It's not "fark you"-level money, but I don't have to check my bank balance before indulging in a donut or anything, either.

I was able to get there by not living a very exciting life; not buying a new car every two years,  not taking lots of vacation trips, or buying  expensive man toys, etc. but now I have a paid off mortgage and car, a year's pay in the bank, and steady income coming in... because I made choices thirty years ago to be ready by this age. I could have kept working another three years and planned to, then the accountant said I didn't really need to any more, and would actually end up losing money if I kept working longer. So I pulled the yellow handle.  My son has watched me and has started the same savings and deferred comp plans I did, but at an even earlier age, and if his investment program works out like mine, he'll do better than me and finish his working years sooner than me. And I'll be delighted.

The job got plenty tough the last three years. That Dilbert cartoon up-thread about "banishment rooms"? That happened to me this year. The boss hated me, I mean to cartoon levels of hate. But they couldn't just fire me: I was protected by the union and the boss couldn't come up with reasons to fire me for cause. So she tried to "manage me out", meaning, make my life miserable ...

No, it shows how racist he is:

[Fark user image image 700x1006]


The part I like best about that chart is that Science and Time are just more Tools of The Honky Tricknocracy.
 
2021-11-30 9:42:27 PM  

madgonad: The only problem with retiring early is paying for healthcare before you reach Medicare eligibility.


My sister is 60 and her husband is 62. Ford retired him and now they're stopping health insurance for retirees. A plan with similar coverage to Ford's is going to cost them over $4,000 per month.  Ouch.
 
2021-12-01 10:10:13 AM  

Gramma: My sister is 60 and her husband is 62. Ford retired him and now they're stopping health insurance for retirees. A plan with similar coverage to Ford's is going to cost them over $4,000 per month.  Ouch.


Yeah, but Ford probably had a pretty amazing plan. My sister's husband retired slightly early at 63 (she's 62) and they have been buying a silver plan through the ACA. Their premiums are about $800/mo combined and they have deductibles over a grand. Still - it amounts to around $10k per year in premiums. Pretty big bite.
 
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