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(Some Renter)   Build your own home out of Legos made from hemp? Stoner subby regrets not writing that idea down back in '96   (siamagazin.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Building, hempcrete blocks, Building materials, green building material, Just BioFiber, hemp plant sequesters carbon, hemp-lime insulation mixture, Terry Radford  
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658 clicks; posted to STEM » on 30 Nov 2021 at 2:05 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



14 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-11-30 2:17:40 AM  
Sound dampening while sequestering carbon? Fark the home walls, i need a new fence.

/ Yeah i know it will be priced out of usability
// I'm sure there are other downsides
/// just let me dream, dammit!
 
2021-11-30 2:55:44 AM  
Bricks are just the beginning.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-11-30 3:11:48 AM  
Eco-friendly apart from all the insecticide and rat poison you'll have to spray constantly.
 
2021-11-30 4:38:35 AM  

OptimisticCynicism: Sound dampening while sequestering carbon? Fark the home walls, i need a new fence.

/ Yeah i know it will be priced out of usability
// I'm sure there are other downsides
/// just let me dream, dammit!


The "article" was light on details, but I was curious enough to watch the video they included.  They claim the costs to be "on par with, or slightly more expensive than conventional building materials".  Of course that is pretty much a promotional video for the product so you can't necessarily take all claims at face value.  But apparently the whole 'hemp concrete' thing has been around for years, it's just never been practical because it takes forever to build with it.  These guys are instead creating pre-formed bricks of the stuff, making construction much easier and faster.  It's pretty interesting if it works as well as they claim.

jokerscrowbar: Eco-friendly apart from all the insecticide and rat poison you'll have to spray constantly.


They seal and coat the outside of the walls with stucco.  As long as that remains intact pests shouldn't be an issue.  Or at least any more of an issue than with conventional materials.
 
2021-11-30 5:49:49 AM  

jokerscrowbar: Eco-friendly apart from all the insecticide and rat poison you'll have to spray constantly.


Actually that is not why it isnt eco friendly. That all use a lime/cement binder. Making lime has a very significant carbon footprint. The lime does make it pretty much rodent proof and largely immune to water/mold though a good roof is still recommended. Probably wouldn't use it exposed like with a fence.

Note this isnt new. Mineralized wood blocks have been around for decades. This is just substituting the wood chips for hemp hurd (which is a good idea)

You can actually make 2x lumber out of hemp hurd and a resin binder. Will be perfectly straight, insect resistant and never watp. It can't compete with timber at this time though it probably would have been cheaper when lumber was trading for over 1k.
 
2021-11-30 5:50:39 AM  

Neondistraction: OptimisticCynicism: Sound dampening while sequestering carbon? Fark the home walls, i need a new fence.

/ Yeah i know it will be priced out of usability
// I'm sure there are other downsides
/// just let me dream, dammit!

The "article" was light on details, but I was curious enough to watch the video they included.  They claim the costs to be "on par with, or slightly more expensive than conventional building materials".  Of course that is pretty much a promotional video for the product so you can't necessarily take all claims at face value.  But apparently the whole 'hemp concrete' thing has been around for years, it's just never been practical because it takes forever to build with it.  These guys are instead creating pre-formed bricks of the stuff, making construction much easier and faster.  It's pretty interesting if it works as well as they claim.

jokerscrowbar: Eco-friendly apart from all the insecticide and rat poison you'll have to spray constantly.

They seal and coat the outside of the walls with stucco.  As long as that remains intact pests shouldn't be an issue.  Or at least any more of an issue than with conventional materials.


It is thoroughly mineralized with lime/cement. Rodents won't be a problem.
 
2021-11-30 5:53:53 AM  
Maybe for retaining walls, but I live in earthquake country where bricks are not a great idea.
 
2021-11-30 8:17:58 AM  
But how much does it cost? They say comparable to current building costs but is that pre Covid?
 
2021-11-30 8:34:47 AM  
What does it use for cement?
 
2021-11-30 8:45:58 AM  

The_Homeless_Guy: jokerscrowbar: Eco-friendly apart from all the insecticide and rat poison you'll have to spray constantly.

Actually that is not why it isnt eco friendly. That all use a lime/cement binder. Making lime has a very significant carbon footprint.


According to the article, "lime, as it dries, reabsorbs the carbon that was released when it was manufactured."

I don't know much about this; just saying the article claims the overall impact of the line is nil.
 
2021-11-30 10:32:54 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: The_Homeless_Guy: jokerscrowbar: Eco-friendly apart from all the insecticide and rat poison you'll have to spray constantly.

Actually that is not why it isnt eco friendly. That all use a lime/cement binder. Making lime has a very significant carbon footprint.

According to the article, "lime, as it dries, reabsorbs the carbon that was released when it was manufactured."

I don't know much about this; just saying the article claims the overall impact of the line is nil.


True is does reabsorb. Unfortunately it takes a lot of heat to initiate the initial reaction that releases the CO2. That usually comes from burning natural gas, or in the old days coal. If the thermal energy came from a renewable source the lime would be carbon neutral.
 
2021-11-30 11:06:13 AM  
I'm working on a hempcrete/Faswall building right now so I'm getting a kick out of these replies...

/Faswall is similar, mineralized wood chips formed into hollow blocks that can be filled with concrete.  Because hempcrete isn't appropriate for retaining walls.
 
2021-11-30 11:11:04 AM  

ArcadianRefugee: The_Homeless_Guy: jokerscrowbar: Eco-friendly apart from all the insecticide and rat poison you'll have to spray constantly.

Actually that is not why it isnt eco friendly. That all use a lime/cement binder. Making lime has a very significant carbon footprint.

According to the article, "lime, as it dries, reabsorbs the carbon that was released when it was manufactured."

I don't know much about this; just saying the article claims the overall impact of the line is nil.


Just to give you an idea you have to heat the limestone up to 900C. Pretty hot. The carbon the limestone releases will eventually reintegrate. However whatever energy was used to get it up to 900C is gone.
 
2021-11-30 11:32:26 AM  
I've often thought it'd be interesting to build a home from giant Lego bricks, but I always figured they'd be made from recycled tires or something.
 
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