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(Yahoo)   Sales of plant-based "meats" are failing to coagulate from their fermented protein slurry   (yahoo.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, SuperValu, Grocery store, Safeway Inc., Supermarket, Nutrition, Canadian company, Maple Leaf Foods, Bahige El-Rayes  
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387 clicks; posted to Food » on 30 Nov 2021 at 12:31 AM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-11-30 12:39:29 AM  
The difficulty with these products is that while they don't exactly taste bad, they certainly don't taste good. And if you're paying for lunch, you want something that you're looking forward to, as opposed to...meh. A portobello mushroom, marinated a bit before grilling will give you superior texture and taste. And be about the right size and weight to be worth making a sandwich out of. And be a damn sight cheaper too.
 
2021-11-30 12:55:52 AM  
Me and a bud dared each other to take a bite of skunk cabbage, kids camping in a preserve.  One of my most, if not #1 of my most horrible oral memories.
 
2021-11-30 1:02:28 AM  

tonguedepressor: Me and a bud dared each other to take a bite of skunk cabbage, kids camping in a preserve.  One of my most, if not #1 of my most horrible oral memories.


I mention it because beef is more regulated than 7 different types of mass grown fake beef vegetables.
 
2021-11-30 1:06:48 AM  
Maybe they should add a little e. coli for that authentic burger experience

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-11-30 1:14:31 AM  
Last time I checked (about a year ago) fake meat cost 50% more than the real thing, and reading the nutritional label didn't give me warm fuzzies.

I'm not paying extra for something that doesn't taste as good and isn't any healthier.
 
2021-11-30 1:19:01 AM  
There are a few great options like beyond's breakfast sausage and brats and Morningstar farms vegan chorizo crumbles, but for me the chicken is not so good and the burgers always hurt my stomach.
 
2021-11-30 1:26:57 AM  
"I'm a vegetarian. I eat vegetables. I don't like meat. I don't want to eat things that pretend to be meat."

- my girlfriend

(you wouldn't know her, she's Canadian)
 
2021-11-30 1:29:17 AM  
It's a failure of meat replacements more than a failure of vegan or vegetarian cuisine. Indian food is frequently vegan or vegetarian, and it is delicious. Some Thai dishes can be meat-free. Almost any restaurant that specializes in vegan cuisine will have menu items that are delicious without any caveats.

I'm not even a vegetarian. I LOVE meat and meat products, but I'll never turn down an invitation to a vegan restaurant.

It's when there is an attempt to replace meat that things fall apart. Maybe one day there will be a vegan meat replacement that is indistinguishable from the real thing, but so far it's all been pretty disappointing. Approaching vegan cuisine on its own terms results in great experiences. Vegan cuisine trying to meet the carnivore diet on meat-eater terms is a losing proposition (so far).
 
2021-11-30 1:31:28 AM  
I was raised a Seventh Day Adventist so I grew up eating fake meat. Not that it's really healthier than regular meat, it's just different.

Oh man y'all ever had a yogi burger?
 
2021-11-30 1:46:51 AM  
We're interested in healthier options. Beyond Meat and Impossible Burger are most definitely not meat, and a very disappointing substitute. Post 0 in this comment thread is spot on.

I'd rather harvest and prepare my own game meats for a variety of reasons. The meat tastes better, it is generally healthier, it helps out conservation efforts, and in some cases helps control the populations of invasive species.

That seems like the best current alternative to the industrial farmed meats in supermarkets, and the veggie slurry wearing groucho glasses trying to convince me it's meat.
 
2021-11-30 2:03:33 AM  

neapoi: I was raised a Seventh Day Adventist so I grew up eating fake meat. Not that it's really healthier than regular meat, it's just different.

Oh man y'all ever had a yogi burger?


Carob is not chocolate, dog darn it!

(hippies foisted that crap, too. The krishnas had rice pudding which was way better than carob. Love you mom, glad you grew out of that phase of our lives)
 
2021-11-30 2:29:25 AM  
Impossible ground 'beef' hasn't been in stock at any of my local Walmarts for months, not sure if that's a supply chain problem, a vendor-retailer spat, or what, but having the flagship product from the market leader missing from the biggest grocery retailer could certainly be hitting the sales a bit.

BTW picked up their chicken and breakfast sausage over the weekend, will probably report on them in a future thread.
 
2021-11-30 3:23:05 AM  

neapoi: I was raised a Seventh Day Adventist so I grew up eating fake meat. Not that it's really healthier than regular meat, it's just different.

Oh man y'all ever had a yogi burger?


Fark user imageView Full Size


Tastier than your average burger!
 
2021-11-30 3:26:05 AM  

Burn_The_Plows: neapoi: I was raised a Seventh Day Adventist so I grew up eating fake meat. Not that it's really healthier than regular meat, it's just different.

Oh man y'all ever had a yogi burger?

[Fark user image image 265x376]

Tastier than your average burger!


This is a weird religious-based food porn. I hope all you sick freaks enjoy.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-11-30 3:59:33 AM  

Snotnose: Last time I checked (about a year ago) fake meat cost 50% more than the real thing, and reading the nutritional label didn't give me warm fuzzies.

I'm not paying extra for something that doesn't taste as good and isn't any healthier.


Yep, same here.

1 lb pkg 80/20 ground beef is $4.08. 3 lb pkg is $11.32, so roughly $3.77 lb.

Ingredients: Beef

Impossible burger contains (Price = $5.96 for 12 oz pkg/$7.95 lb).

Water, Soy Protein Concentrate, Coconut Oil, Sunflower Oil, Natural Flavors, 2% or less of: Potato Protein, Methylcellulose, Yeast Extract, Cultured Dextrose, Food Starch Modified, Soy Leghemoglobin, Salt, Soy Protein Isolate, Mixed Tocopherols (Vitamin E), Zinc Gluconate, Thiamine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B1), Sodium Ascorbate (Vitamin C), Niacin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Vitamin B12

These are the prices at my local Walmart.
 
2021-11-30 4:17:12 AM  
I got curious and priced Beyond Meat Beyond Burger Patties (2 patties in package) at Walmart.

This is a 1/2 lb pkg for $4.84 ($9.68 lb)

Ingredients:

Water, Pea Protein Isolate, Expeller-Pressed Canola Oil, Refined Coconut Oil, Rice Protein, Natural Flavors, Cocoa Butter, Mung Bean Protein, Methylcellulose, Potato Starch, Apple Extract, Salt, Potassium Chloride, Vinegar, Lemon Juice Concentrate, Sunflower Lecithin, Pomegranate Fruit Powder, Beet Juice Extract (for color)


Or if I'm too lazy to make my own hamburger patties, I can buy a 4-pack of 80/20 ground beef patties for $6.62 ($4.98 lb). I could also buy a 3 lb bag (12 patties per bag) of frozen 80/20 beef burgers for $11.92 ($3.97 lb).
 
2021-11-30 4:18:07 AM  

whither_apophis: Maybe they should add a little e. coli for that authentic burger experience

[Fark user image 850x270]


No risk, no reward.
 
2021-11-30 5:20:40 AM  

neapoi: Burn_The_Plows: neapoi: I was raised a Seventh Day Adventist so I grew up eating fake meat. Not that it's really healthier than regular meat, it's just different.

Oh man y'all ever had a yogi burger?

[Fark user image image 265x376]

Tastier than your average burger!

This is a weird religious-based food porn. I hope all you sick freaks enjoy.



Fark user imageView Full Size
Wanna bean pie?
 
2021-11-30 6:09:29 AM  

neapoi: I was raised a Seventh Day Adventist so I grew up eating fake meat. Not that it's really healthier than regular meat, it's just different.

Oh man y'all ever had a yogi burger?


nope, but they sell loma linda brand pseudo tuna here, comes in a little pouch. definitely not tuna but not bad tasting, just...different.
also, if you happen to get in a car or other wreck and need reassembly or other medical things done, loma linda is the place to be sent to...
 
2021-11-30 6:58:47 AM  

skiinstructor: neapoi: I was raised a Seventh Day Adventist so I grew up eating fake meat. Not that it's really healthier than regular meat, it's just different.

Oh man y'all ever had a yogi burger?

nope, but they sell loma linda brand pseudo tuna here, comes in a little pouch. definitely not tuna but not bad tasting, just...different.
also, if you happen to get in a car or other wreck and need reassembly or other medical things done, loma linda is the place to be sent to...


That's the thing, the Morningstar Farms faux sausage patties? They taste good. Full stop. They are enjoyable, even if you do eat meat. They are, as an ingredient or a dish itself, tasty on their own. The 'links' have a texture issue that I don't like, but the patties crisp up nice, they have good texture, and I buy them for exactly what they are, and I eat meat, because I like the flavor. Morningstar also does a faux-'chicken nugget' that is tasty as heck too. Then again, the vegetarian products that emulate poultry products tends to be better all around, both texture and flavor-wise. Though, to be fair, they aren't exactly healthier when you douse them with oil and pop them back like chicken nuggets either.

If you have a product, it's got to be good on its own, not 'for what it is.' Hence, why I'll happily tucker into a portobello 'burger' but Beyonds...they're...meh.
 
2021-11-30 9:06:16 AM  

hubiestubert: The difficulty with these products is that while they don't exactly taste bad, they certainly don't taste good.


Fine, I'll be the contratrian in the thread. I like Impossible Burgers about as much as real burgers. I can tell they're not beef, but they're within the variation of other beef-adjacent products I like, such as bison burgers. I don't like Beyond Burgers or any other meat substitute I've tried, but  Impossible Burgers are the one exception.
 
2021-11-30 9:09:24 AM  

Ambitwistor: hubiestubert: The difficulty with these products is that while they don't exactly taste bad, they certainly don't taste good.

Fine, I'll be the contratrian in the thread. I like Impossible Burgers about as much as real burgers. I can tell they're not beef, but they're within the variation of other beef-adjacent products I like, such as bison burgers. I don't like Beyond Burgers or any other meat substitute I've tried, but  Impossible Burgers are the one exception.


Also, they're not that expensive, like $12 for a box of 4.
 
2021-11-30 9:11:18 AM  
"healthier options"  The author has obviously not read any of the ingredient lists.  Most of the plant-based "meats" fall into the ultra-processed category and several use GMO ingredients.

If I wanted an alternative, old-school bean burgers are fine.
 
2021-11-30 9:18:51 AM  

Ambitwistor: hubiestubert: The difficulty with these products is that while they don't exactly taste bad, they certainly don't taste good.

Fine, I'll be the contratrian in the thread. I like Impossible Burgers about as much as real burgers. I can tell they're not beef, but they're within the variation of other beef-adjacent products I like, such as bison burgers. I don't like Beyond Burgers or any other meat substitute I've tried, but  Impossible Burgers are the one exception.


Agreed 100%, when doing a blind A/B on regular Whopper vs Impossible Whopper the only way I could tell was a slightly drier crumb. That's when I realized how good it was. I started using their ground beef substitute for things like Marinara, taco meat, Lasagna, etc where you'd never really notice. Cut our beef consumption by about half. It started out at about 3x the $/lb vs beef, it's already down to 1.5x after ~2 years on the market. I figure give it another 2 years and they'll be able to hit price parity. But to me the environmental aspect of halving my beef consumption is worth the ~$10/week extra it costs me right now.
 
2021-11-30 9:27:55 AM  

We Ate the Necco Wafers: It's a failure of meat replacements more than a failure of vegan or vegetarian cuisine. Indian food is frequently vegan or vegetarian, and it is delicious. Some Thai dishes can be meat-free. Almost any restaurant that specializes in vegan cuisine will have menu items that are delicious without any caveats.

I'm not even a vegetarian. I LOVE meat and meat products, but I'll never turn down an invitation to a vegan restaurant.

It's when there is an attempt to replace meat that things fall apart. Maybe one day there will be a vegan meat replacement that is indistinguishable from the real thing, but so far it's all been pretty disappointing. Approaching vegan cuisine on its own terms results in great experiences. Vegan cuisine trying to meet the carnivore diet on meat-eater terms is a losing proposition (so far).


My problem with a lot of western vegan/vegetarian places is the prices.

Maybe it's just the market demographic here that's willing to pay so much, but I'll be goddamned if I'm gonna pay $15 for a medium bowl of chana masala that's not done as well as the Indian buffet across town that charges the same price for the whole buffet.
 
2021-11-30 9:38:12 AM  
My one vegetarian daughter has a whole faux turkey to eat at Xmas dinner this year. Nobody else has volunteered to help her with that task.
'Keep eatin' - there's lots more where that came from.'
 
2021-11-30 9:40:24 AM  

Snotnose: Last time I checked (about a year ago) fake meat cost 50% more than the real thing, and reading the nutritional label didn't give me warm fuzzies.

I'm not paying extra for something that doesn't taste as good and isn't any healthier.


This.

I tried the impossible whopper. It was "fine", but it cost more and was not healthier. It had more sodium by far.

Veggie tech will probably get there, but not yet.
 
2021-11-30 9:41:18 AM  

Nicki Minaj's Cousin's Friend's Swollen Testicle: "I'm a vegetarian. I eat vegetables. I don't like meat. I don't want to eat things that pretend to be meat."

- my girlfriend

(you wouldn't know her, she's Canadian)



Oh.... we know her.

/She won't eat meat but she sure likes the bone.
 
2021-11-30 9:43:57 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-11-30 9:59:48 AM  

robodog: Ambitwistor: hubiestubert: The difficulty with these products is that while they don't exactly taste bad, they certainly don't taste good.

Fine, I'll be the contratrian in the thread. I like Impossible Burgers about as much as real burgers. I can tell they're not beef, but they're within the variation of other beef-adjacent products I like, such as bison burgers. I don't like Beyond Burgers or any other meat substitute I've tried, but  Impossible Burgers are the one exception.

Agreed 100%, when doing a blind A/B on regular Whopper vs Impossible Whopper the only way I could tell was a slightly drier crumb. That's when I realized how good it was. I started using their ground beef substitute for things like Marinara, taco meat, Lasagna, etc where you'd never really notice. Cut our beef consumption by about half. It started out at about 3x the $/lb vs beef, it's already down to 1.5x after ~2 years on the market. I figure give it another 2 years and they'll be able to hit price parity. But to me the environmental aspect of halving my beef consumption is worth the ~$10/week extra it costs me right now.


It really should be a two pronged approach if you want people to eat less meat. A frozen chik'un nugget really isn't that different from a frozen chicken nugget. So if you're in the market for nuggets one that is partially or wholly made from plants is an easy swap for you. That's what most of the fake meat industry is focusing on. But the other prong should just be meals that aren't meat. Not "here's a vegan version" but "hey, lentil coconut soup is delicious and you could eat that a couple times of week instead of chicken and potatoes." That's the part that isn't so popular because it's not focused around a specific product to sell.
 
2021-11-30 10:37:12 AM  

SpectroBoy: Snotnose: Last time I checked (about a year ago) fake meat cost 50% more than the real thing, and reading the nutritional label didn't give me warm fuzzies.

I'm not paying extra for something that doesn't taste as good and isn't any healthier.

This.

I tried the impossible whopper. It was "fine", but it cost more and was not healthier. It had more sodium by far.

Veggie tech will probably get there, but not yet.


It was never meant to be healthier (there have been vegetarian meat substitutes like black bean burgers etc that are healthier for generations, they never caught on with most people), Impossible was founded to make a meat substitute that was as close as possible to being a 1:1 replacement for animal meat while drastically cutting the environmental impact. IMHO they've succeeded and there's no real reason that they can't eventually get the cost lower than meat given the much cheaper inputs, but they're a young company still in expansion mode so taking some profits now to expand their capacity makes sense.

I'd say I'm  right in their target market, I use ground meat 3-4x a week to make a whole host of dishes but I'm becoming more aware of the environmental impact of meat, particularly beef. As far as the comment above about switching to purpose built vegetarian dishes, that's all well and good but that option's been out there well forever and it's not been all that successful in the mass market (at least in the US), so offering a drop in replacement for ground meat that works in 90+% of dishes is a huge win as it makes it an easy swap, once they reach price parity I think you'll see even more adoption, and if they can get it cheaper than ground meat then I think it will have a chance to take a huge chunk of the protein market because in most use cases you'd be very hard pressed to tell the difference (seriously, I make you a sloppy joe or walking taco I'd bet $100 you couldn't pick out the one made with Impossible meat).
 
2021-11-30 11:15:02 AM  
People don't want to pay more for an inferior product? I'm shocked!

Maybe Apple can come out with IMeat and rope in their fanboys.
 
2021-11-30 11:21:20 AM  
Oh, and speaking of Indian food earlier...

That always pops up in these threads, but it occurs to me that the badass vegetarian Mediterranean food doesn't get enough love.

It's always a treat to walk into a good Greek or Middle Eastern place that has all the awesome salads, dips, roasted veggies, etc.
 
2021-11-30 11:50:40 AM  

odinsposse: It really should be a two pronged approach if you want people to eat less meat. A frozen chik'un nugget really isn't that different from a frozen chicken nugget. So if you're in the market for nuggets one that is partially or wholly made from plants is an easy swap for you. That's what most of the fake meat industry is focusing on. But the other prong should just be meals that aren't meat. Not "here's a vegan version" but "hey, lentil coconut soup is delicious and you could eat that a couple times of week instead of chicken and potatoes." That's the part that isn't so popular because it's not focused around a specific product to sell.


I agree, and generally scorn most "fake meat pretending to be meat" ... I eat a lot of vegetarian meals myself (and as you and others have noted, there are a lot of rich ethnic cuisines to draw from there; America tends to treat vegetables as side dishes).  Though I attended a talk by the Impossible Foods CEO, and he thinks there's a hard core of the market who is just never going to let go of meat-based dishes, so that's what he wants to focus on.  Sometimes I'm just in the mood for a burger.
 
2021-11-30 11:57:21 AM  

Ambitwistor: hubiestubert: The difficulty with these products is that while they don't exactly taste bad, they certainly don't taste good.

Fine, I'll be the contratrian in the thread. I like Impossible Burgers about as much as real burgers. I can tell they're not beef, but they're within the variation of other beef-adjacent products I like, such as bison burgers. I don't like Beyond Burgers or any other meat substitute I've tried, but  Impossible Burgers are the one exception.


Impossible burgers are pretty decent, but then again it depends on your definition of "real burgers" since this can vary greatly in quality.  If we're talking regular Whopper vs. Impossible Whopper then yeah, they're pretty damn close.  But while good, the Impossible burgers are still on a much lower tier than higher quality burger chains and of course anything you can make at home.  I think they (and other products) can eventually get there though.

However, the biggest issue with these meat substitutes is that they're really not solving any sort of sustainability problem until they can move beyond the ground meat substitute product.  Cows will continue to be raised and butchered for all of the other more desirable cuts.
 
2021-11-30 12:35:33 PM  

Joey Jo Jo Jr Shabadu: Impossible burgers are pretty decent, but then again it depends on your definition of "real burgers" since this can vary greatly in quality.  If we're talking regular Whopper vs. Impossible Whopper then yeah, they're pretty damn close.  But while good, the Impossible burgers are still on a much lower tier than higher quality burger chains and of course anything you can make at home.


Maybe I don't have a refined palate or good cooking skills, but I think they're about the same as what I make at home.

However, the biggest issue with these meat substitutes is that they're really not solving any sort of sustainability problem until they can move beyond the ground meat substitute product.  Cows will continue to be raised and butchered for all of the other more desirable cuts.

I think in the U.S., ground beef is still almost half of beef consumption (more than half, for home cooking), so you could still make a decent dent in the problem.  Still, it would be good to move beyond ground meat substitutes.  (It's kind of moot anyway, as they haven't even achieved high market penetration into ground meat yet.)
 
2021-11-30 12:44:14 PM  

Ambitwistor: I think in the U.S., ground beef is still almost half of beef consumption (more than half, for home cooking), so you could still make a decent dent in the problem.  Still, it would be good to move beyond ground meat substitutes.  (It's kind of moot anyway, as they haven't even achieved high market penetration into ground meat yet.)


I think the problem though is that even though ground beef consumption is big, cows aren't specifically raised for ground beef.  So even if a significant portion of the ground beef market would switch over to substitute products, that wouldn't really have much of an effect on beef production.
 
2021-11-30 1:30:03 PM  

Kassandry: We're interested in healthier options. Beyond Meat and Impossible Burger are most definitely not meat, and a very disappointing substitute. Post 0 in this comment thread is spot on.


they're also not healthy. THey have the same or more calories, and lack the other good things. They're lower fat, sure, but we've learned that fat isn't the villain we thought it was. There's zero benefit health wise, they're not more tasty, with all the formulation and shipping they're not much better for the enviorment, and honestly, I don't have much on the ethics concern.
 
2021-11-30 2:15:25 PM  
Some of the plant-based meat alternatives are really quite good if it's seasoned or cooked properly. The Beyond burgers, for example, are top notch and if you cook them on the grill/smoker they get that smoky grilled flavor. With the beet juice they use you can approximate medium rare with a hot pink center. I grilled some for a vegan friend of mine and he was having trouble with the burger because, in his opinion, it was too much like meat for his liking.

More recently I tried the Beyond ground "beef" as a substitute for cheap and easy Americanized tacos. The difference in texture was more noticeable, but it really soaked up the taco seasoning and tasted perfectly fine.

The bottom line is that, in general, reducing our meat consumption significantly will be a necessary step to help curb the worst effects of climate change. We should all be striving to adapt our diets if not for our personal health then for the sake of our species' survival.
 
2021-11-30 2:24:57 PM  
Ok, decided I didn't want turkey noodle soup for a second  meal in a row so I broke out the Impossible chicken nuggets, other than the fact that the coating didn't brown the way I like despite doing higher temp and longer time than the directions it was a perfect substitute for chicken nuggets. I think next time I'll see if putting it on toast for 12 minutes instead of 450 will get them the way I like but I would call them a perfect solution for a quick lunch or emergency weeknight meal. I covered them with my preferred wing sauce and honestly other than perhaps being a tad on the salty side you'd have a hard time telling that they weren't run of the mill frozen section chicken nuggets. If they keep well in the freezer I can see always having a couple bags for emergency ration use =)
 
2021-11-30 2:40:28 PM  
Tried to go vegetarian a few years ago... turns out, my body HATES being vegetarian.  Two blocked kidneys from oxalate stones, sepsis and an ICU stay later... My doc's advice? "Yeah, stay away from that. Eat meat."

/no nuts, spinach, beans, soy of any kind, taters, rhubarb, and many other veggies.
 
2021-11-30 3:00:58 PM  
Ok, I just checked, and they're actually significantly less salty than Walmart's Great Value nuggets, a bit less than Tyson's nuggets, and a bit more salty than McNuggets (by far my most consumed chicken nugget). So compared to at-home alternatives from the frozen section they're actually not bad, I'm just more used to McDonald's offering which is the least salty by a pretty good margin.
 
2021-11-30 3:08:28 PM  

robodog: Ok, I just checked, and they're actually significantly less salty than Walmart's Great Value nuggets, a bit less than Tyson's nuggets, and a bit more salty than McNuggets (by far my most consumed chicken nugget). So compared to at-home alternatives from the frozen section they're actually not bad, I'm just more used to McDonald's offering which is the least salty by a pretty good margin.


Yeah, but...

Surely the bulk of McNuggets are consumed with one of their sauces. And that shiat is definitely salty.

Just sayin', I suspect fast food chicken nuggets are less salty in general than store-bought frozen ones, because the fast food place is able to also throw their dipping sauce at the customer.
 
2021-11-30 3:12:08 PM  

olrasputin: robodog: Ok, I just checked, and they're actually significantly less salty than Walmart's Great Value nuggets, a bit less than Tyson's nuggets, and a bit more salty than McNuggets (by far my most consumed chicken nugget). So compared to at-home alternatives from the frozen section they're actually not bad, I'm just more used to McDonald's offering which is the least salty by a pretty good margin.

Yeah, but...

Surely the bulk of McNuggets are consumed with one of their sauces. And that shiat is definitely salty.

Just sayin', I suspect fast food chicken nuggets are less salty in general than store-bought frozen ones, because the fast food place is able to also throw their dipping sauce at the customer.


160mg for the sweet and sour sauce, it makes it almost even, but personally I'm not eating the frozen ones bare, they're going to get a BBQ sauce or wing sauce which is at least as salty as the McD's stuff on a per-serving basis.
 
2021-11-30 3:18:42 PM  

robodog: olrasputin: robodog: Ok, I just checked, and they're actually significantly less salty than Walmart's Great Value nuggets, a bit less than Tyson's nuggets, and a bit more salty than McNuggets (by far my most consumed chicken nugget). So compared to at-home alternatives from the frozen section they're actually not bad, I'm just more used to McDonald's offering which is the least salty by a pretty good margin.

Yeah, but...

Surely the bulk of McNuggets are consumed with one of their sauces. And that shiat is definitely salty.

Just sayin', I suspect fast food chicken nuggets are less salty in general than store-bought frozen ones, because the fast food place is able to also throw their dipping sauce at the customer.

160mg for the sweet and sour sauce, it makes it almost even, but personally I'm not eating the frozen ones bare, they're going to get a BBQ sauce or wing sauce which is at least as salty as the McD's stuff on a per-serving basis.


Well sure. Most people should fall into that category.

But from the point of view of the company selling the nuggets, the fast food crowd is a captive audience to your sauce, so they'll actively know that by turning it down, they're not eating the food as intended. The frozen nugget supplier has no control over what its customers do, so they have extra incentive to bump up the "reward center" ingredients. They don't want someone eating them plain or with meh sauce in a pinch, going "Man, these kinda suck," and trying a different brand.
 
2021-11-30 4:21:57 PM  

bobug: Tried to go vegetarian a few years ago... turns out, my body HATES being vegetarian.  Two blocked kidneys from oxalate stones, sepsis and an ICU stay later... My doc's advice? "Yeah, stay away from that. Eat meat."

/no nuts, spinach, beans, soy of any kind, taters, rhubarb, and many other veggies.


My diet can be best described as semi-vegetarian because I am actively trying to cut back on my meat consumption for health reasons.

However, I found out quickly that I'm ill-suited to go full-on vegan because I have IBS and a lot of vegetables contain insoluble fiber, which is poorly tolerated by many of us with the condition. I also cannot tolerate most whole grains well, like whole wheat, for the same reason. I know it's supposedly healthier for me to eat whole wheat bread, but it certainly doesn't feel that way when the results are even more trips to the bathroom.

I do eat vegetables every day, but I know what I can vs can't tolerate well. For example, I like brussels sprouts, but I rarely eat them because I know the end results will be unpleasant.
 
2021-11-30 4:56:16 PM  

Bathia_Mapes: bobug: Tried to go vegetarian a few years ago... turns out, my body HATES being vegetarian.  Two blocked kidneys from oxalate stones, sepsis and an ICU stay later... My doc's advice? "Yeah, stay away from that. Eat meat."

/no nuts, spinach, beans, soy of any kind, taters, rhubarb, and many other veggies.

My diet can be best described as semi-vegetarian because I am actively trying to cut back on my meat consumption for health reasons.

However, I found out quickly that I'm ill-suited to go full-on vegan because I have IBS and a lot of vegetables contain insoluble fiber, which is poorly tolerated by many of us with the condition. I also cannot tolerate most whole grains well, like whole wheat, for the same reason. I know it's supposedly healthier for me to eat whole wheat bread, but it certainly doesn't feel that way when the results are even more trips to the bathroom.

I do eat vegetables every day, but I know what I can vs can't tolerate well. For example, I like brussels sprouts, but I rarely eat them because I know the end results will be unpleasant.


Be cautious of oxalate in food, too. It can cause kidney stones (hydration helps a lot). I just started moving towards it with more plant based options out there. I love beans and fresh spinach. We love what wants to murder us :)
 
2021-11-30 5:22:57 PM  

bobug: Bathia_Mapes: bobug: Tried to go vegetarian a few years ago... turns out, my body HATES being vegetarian.  Two blocked kidneys from oxalate stones, sepsis and an ICU stay later... My doc's advice? "Yeah, stay away from that. Eat meat."

/no nuts, spinach, beans, soy of any kind, taters, rhubarb, and many other veggies.

My diet can be best described as semi-vegetarian because I am actively trying to cut back on my meat consumption for health reasons.

However, I found out quickly that I'm ill-suited to go full-on vegan because I have IBS and a lot of vegetables contain insoluble fiber, which is poorly tolerated by many of us with the condition. I also cannot tolerate most whole grains well, like whole wheat, for the same reason. I know it's supposedly healthier for me to eat whole wheat bread, but it certainly doesn't feel that way when the results are even more trips to the bathroom.

I do eat vegetables every day, but I know what I can vs can't tolerate well. For example, I like brussels sprouts, but I rarely eat them because I know the end results will be unpleasant.

Be cautious of oxalate in food, too. It can cause kidney stones (hydration helps a lot). I just started moving towards it with more plant based options out there. I love beans and fresh spinach. We love what wants to murder us :)


I will!

I also noticed quite a few of the plant-based "meats/poultry" contain canola oil, which I cannot tolerate, making them a no-go option. I usually have a bad reaction (Like run as fast as I can to the nearest bathroom) if I unknowingly eat something cooked in canola oil or the food item has canola high on the list of ingredients.

I've had to switch brands on stuff like spaghetti sauce and salad dressing because the ones I had been using for years switched from soybean oil (Which I have zero issues with) to canola, with me finding out after the fact. After that I started reading labels even more closely on products I bought regularly so I wouldn't slip up again.
 
2021-11-30 5:45:04 PM  

bobug: Bathia_Mapes: bobug: Tried to go vegetarian a few years ago... turns out, my body HATES being vegetarian.  Two blocked kidneys from oxalate stones, sepsis and an ICU stay later... My doc's advice? "Yeah, stay away from that. Eat meat."

/no nuts, spinach, beans, soy of any kind, taters, rhubarb, and many other veggies.

My diet can be best described as semi-vegetarian because I am actively trying to cut back on my meat consumption for health reasons.

However, I found out quickly that I'm ill-suited to go full-on vegan because I have IBS and a lot of vegetables contain insoluble fiber, which is poorly tolerated by many of us with the condition. I also cannot tolerate most whole grains well, like whole wheat, for the same reason. I know it's supposedly healthier for me to eat whole wheat bread, but it certainly doesn't feel that way when the results are even more trips to the bathroom.

I do eat vegetables every day, but I know what I can vs can't tolerate well. For example, I like brussels sprouts, but I rarely eat them because I know the end results will be unpleasant.

Be cautious of oxalate in food, too. It can cause kidney stones (hydration helps a lot). I just started moving towards it with more plant based options out there. I love beans and fresh spinach. We love what wants to murder us :)


As someone with lactose intolerance that didn't kick in until I was in my mid 30's due to antibiotics killing my gut biom I totally feel you, luckily there are plenty of lactose free specialty foods out there for me, hopefully you'll find things you love that don't wreck your system =)

/Was SO happy when I found a good mint chocolate chip icecream that was lactose free the other week, it had been years since I had had one and it that was always my favorite.
 
2021-11-30 6:45:34 PM  

robodog: bobug: Bathia_Mapes: bobug: Tried to go vegetarian a few years ago... turns out, my body HATES being vegetarian.  Two blocked kidneys from oxalate stones, sepsis and an ICU stay later... My doc's advice? "Yeah, stay away from that. Eat meat."

/no nuts, spinach, beans, soy of any kind, taters, rhubarb, and many other veggies.

My diet can be best described as semi-vegetarian because I am actively trying to cut back on my meat consumption for health reasons.

However, I found out quickly that I'm ill-suited to go full-on vegan because I have IBS and a lot of vegetables contain insoluble fiber, which is poorly tolerated by many of us with the condition. I also cannot tolerate most whole grains well, like whole wheat, for the same reason. I know it's supposedly healthier for me to eat whole wheat bread, but it certainly doesn't feel that way when the results are even more trips to the bathroom.

I do eat vegetables every day, but I know what I can vs can't tolerate well. For example, I like brussels sprouts, but I rarely eat them because I know the end results will be unpleasant.

Be cautious of oxalate in food, too. It can cause kidney stones (hydration helps a lot). I just started moving towards it with more plant based options out there. I love beans and fresh spinach. We love what wants to murder us :)

As someone with lactose intolerance that didn't kick in until I was in my mid 30's due to antibiotics killing my gut biom I totally feel you, luckily there are plenty of lactose free specialty foods out there for me, hopefully you'll find things you love that don't wreck your system =)

/Was SO happy when I found a good mint chocolate chip icecream that was lactose free the other week, it had been years since I had had one and it that was always my favorite.


Thanks 😊😊 it has been a learning process. No more chocolate, either. Cooked tomatoes (including pizza sauce). But, really...I am good. I was a hair's breath from dying... Got blocked and didn't realize the pain wasn't PMS...and went septic...and then the second kidney got blocked. I was incredibly fortunate. So...losing some foods? Whatever. I still get to play on the right side of the dirt.
 
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