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(Slate)   "My daughter's best friend goes to therapy, and my daughter was invited to eavesdrop on one of the sessions. Should she?"   (slate.com) divider line
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431 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 29 Nov 2021 at 8:42 AM (24 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-11-29 8:06:38 AM  
21 votes:
So the kid thought something was wrong with how therapy was going and asked a friend to listen in as a sanity check. Not the worst plan a kid could devise. I mean, an adult might have been a better choice.

BUT, if it turned out the therapist was problematic we would be heralding these kids as geniuses.

Tough one. Therapy confidentiality is for the patient's benefit. If she chose to share with her friend that seems like her choice on some level.

Kids are complicated AF
 
2021-11-29 8:42:49 AM  
14 votes:

SpectroBoy: BUT, if it turned out the therapist was problematic we would be heralding these kids as geniuses.


Yeah, that's what I was thinking. On the one hand, obviously therapy should be private, but on the other hand if this was a situation where the therapist was sketchy and the kid couldn't get anyone to believe her except a friend, it's pretty understandable.

There's a reason why basically every kid-centered horror movie has kids trying to tell the parents about what's going on and the parents not believing them.
 
2021-11-29 9:31:41 AM  
7 votes:
When I was in college, I suddenly found myself surrounded by young women who had been or were being sexually abused. I now know this to be a sick view into how common that is, but at the time it was shocking and had me questioning a few things. I decided to avail myself of a program in which students could get free counseling sessions (the session leaders were themselves doctoral students). Anyway, I have a few sessions, and it goes sideways. The student therapist decides he needs to bring in a real therapist because he's become convinced that I have been sexually assaulted but must be repressing my memories. I stopped going. I never had that session with a real therapist. I have never been sexually assaulted. But for a long time I questioned every memory of my childhood. That man undoubtedly thought he was doing well by me. But I would have dearly loved for someone else to have been there and heard how he was driving the discussions.

Tldr, I know. Therapists/counselors can have a heavy impact. Might be wise to make sure the impact is a positive one.
 
2021-11-29 5:52:57 AM  
6 votes:
Doubling up on the Nope recommendation.
 
2021-11-29 8:45:07 AM  
6 votes:
She was invited by the PATIENT?  Yeah, sure, knock yourself out.
 
2021-11-29 8:55:34 AM  
6 votes:
The patient asked the daughter, and it may just be teenage angst over being forced to do this or the patient could be picking up skeevy vibes off the therapist. The very real possibility of the second would have me worried.
 
2021-11-29 7:30:20 AM  
5 votes:
No.
And support your damaged friend.
But no.
 
2021-11-29 10:21:02 AM  
5 votes:
Ordinarily I'd say no.

OTOH, having actually read part of the article, it's sounds like some farkery might be going on.
 
2021-11-29 9:58:37 AM  
4 votes:
This doesn't strike me as inappropriate or immature. The kid shouldn't hate therapy. If she does, something is wrong. Getting a peer's take on it is not a bad idea.
 
2021-11-29 12:10:58 PM  
4 votes:

LarrySouth: xanadian: The patient decided to break confidentiality?

Stupid AF, but not illegal.

/probably

Can't think of any circumstance where this would be appropriate or legal. If it was appropriate, written and signed Informed Consent would be required for each session.

Licenced Psychologist or Psychiatrist is staring at deregistration and/or prosecution with this shiat,,,


Have any citation for this?

Therapists can have multiple clients at once in group therapy and counseling sessions.

Patients can tape sessions if they want.

If a patient wants to tell their best friend about what they discussed in therapy that is also ok.

So what legal aspect of therapy prevents a tag along?
 
2021-11-29 9:26:35 AM  
3 votes:

xanadian: The patient decided to break confidentiality?

Stupid AF, but not illegal.

/probably


Can't think of any circumstance where this would be appropriate or legal. If it was appropriate, written and signed Informed Consent would be required for each session.

Licenced Psychologist or Psychiatrist is staring at deregistration and/or prosecution with this shiat,,,
 
2021-11-29 12:57:03 PM  
3 votes:

casey17: Here - let me Google that for y'alls:

https://www.hhs.gov/sites/default/files/hipaa-privacy-rule-and-sharing-info-related-to-mental-health.pdf


I'm sure all 12 pages of that are fascinating, but I'm not reading through it all. Can you point me toward the part that concerns a patient sharing what happens in a session?  Because that's what the article is about.
 
2021-11-29 7:48:56 AM  
1 vote:
Fark user imageView Full Size


What Newt said.
 
2021-11-29 9:51:37 AM  
1 vote:
No.
 
2021-11-29 1:04:11 PM  
1 vote:

X-boxershorts: vudukungfu: No.
And support your damaged friend.
But no.

FTA:
"My daughter was on the phone with Maya, looking very intent as she listened-she wasn't speaking at all. Then suddenly she muted the phone and told me: "Maya's in a therapy session right now. She called me during it so I can listen, so I can hear for myself how bad it is."

Maya needs to put some distance between herself and this "friend"....


Man, what a bass ackwards typo....

The Daughter needs to put some distance between herself and this "friend" named Maya
 
2021-11-29 2:11:41 PM  
1 vote:
The only experience I have with this is when one of my extremely defiant, manic, or anxious kids is convinced the therapist is completely wrong.  The reality always turns out that the patient is resistant and noncompliant.

Just because the patient now has a witness to how the session proceeds, doesn't automatically prove the patient's opinion is valid.
 
2021-11-29 3:14:00 PM  
1 vote:
i've been in therapy for 22 years. three times i have invited a guest into session with doctor's permission. i had to sign a paper. these were key people in my life. my goal was to give an opportunity to get questions answered, if any existed. i also offered my guest 'alone time' with the psychiatrist, with the doctor's permission.

it's hard enough dealing with mental illness. you play the cards you received and do what you must to get through.
 
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