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(EurekAlert)   How can our brain still perceive familiar objects even when they become indistinct? Subby typed, trying to remember yesterday's lunch   (eurekalert.org) divider line
    More: Interesting, Brain, visual contrasts, perception of low-contrast familiar objects, National Institute, new flexible mechanism of information representation, primary visual cortex, Visual perception, artificial neural network model  
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580 clicks; posted to STEM » on 28 Nov 2021 at 1:02 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



18 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-11-28 1:08:08 PM  
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2021-11-28 1:09:40 PM  
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2021-11-28 1:44:48 PM  

Gordon Bennett: [Fark user image 532x569]


Came to post this. Leaving slightly unnerved.
 
2021-11-28 1:48:03 PM  
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2021-11-28 2:13:52 PM  
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2021-11-28 2:24:05 PM  

Gordon Bennett: [Fark user image image 532x569]


Latent features and ugly neural network upscaling and interpolation artifacts.
 
2021-11-28 3:04:59 PM  
Whoa, Psychology, man! I majored in that! It helped to get me a job, tho I'll confess I do zero psychology tasks at work. In fact I've never done a single thing related to my degree.

The brain really is a fascinating thing. Just reading this headline made me think about several songs and places I've experienced.

Music being what it is, I can't leave it alone. Here is my future wife:

Super Mario Odyssey - Pauline Band Festival w/ Jump Up Super Star
Youtube h1IHvzwUd6w
 
2021-11-28 3:11:46 PM  

Gordon Bennett: [Fark user image 532x569]


Name one thing in this photo:

Photons, artificial dyes, electrons, carbon atoms....

Anyway...

I have a weird knack of seeing things that other people miss. It drives my co-workers crazy. We'll go into a room for a while to install something, then while leaving I'll ask:  "Did you see the photo of the monkey riding a giraffe on the shelf?".   No one else noticed it.  Is this normal?

I can also identify any 1960-1970's Mopar in foggy darkness, by only seeing four square inches of it.
 
Xai
2021-11-28 4:01:02 PM  
This is actually amazing, think about it: the identification of objects in bright light and dim light is actually completely separate.

This explains everything about how you see scary stuff in the dark
 
2021-11-28 4:05:46 PM  
That's an unfortunate acronym for the authoring organization given it's location.
 
2021-11-28 4:29:31 PM  

asymptonic: That's an unfortunate acronym for the authoring organization given it's location.


They're taking it back.
 
2021-11-28 6:44:28 PM  

amigafin: Gordon Bennett: [Fark user image 532x569]

Name one thing in this photo:

Photons, artificial dyes, electrons, carbon atoms....

Anyway...

I have a weird knack of seeing things that other people miss. It drives my co-workers crazy. We'll go into a room for a while to install something, then while leaving I'll ask:  "Did you see the photo of the monkey riding a giraffe on the shelf?".   No one else noticed it.  Is this normal?

I can also identify any 1960-1970's Mopar in foggy darkness, by only seeing four square inches of it.


I bet you could count all the passes in this video

selective attention test
Youtube vJG698U2Mvo
 
2021-11-28 8:41:44 PM  

BarryJV: amigafin: Gordon Bennett: [Fark user image 532x569]

Name one thing in this photo:

Photons, artificial dyes, electrons, carbon atoms....

Anyway...

I have a weird knack of seeing things that other people miss. It drives my co-workers crazy. We'll go into a room for a while to install something, then while leaving I'll ask:  "Did you see the photo of the monkey riding a giraffe on the shelf?".   No one else noticed it.  Is this normal?

I can also identify any 1960-1970's Mopar in foggy darkness, by only seeing four square inches of it.

I bet you could count all the passes in this video

[iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/vJG698U2​Mvo?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsap​i=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&​widgetid=1]


Why is the letter S painted on the wall twice? And what is the deal with the gorilla?
 
2021-11-28 10:25:19 PM  

amigafin: BarryJV: amigafin: Gordon Bennett: [Fark user image 532x569]

Name one thing in this photo:

Photons, artificial dyes, electrons, carbon atoms....

Anyway...

I have a weird knack of seeing things that other people miss. It drives my co-workers crazy. We'll go into a room for a while to install something, then while leaving I'll ask:  "Did you see the photo of the monkey riding a giraffe on the shelf?".   No one else noticed it.  Is this normal?

I can also identify any 1960-1970's Mopar in foggy darkness, by only seeing four square inches of it.

I bet you could count all the passes in this video

[iFrame https://www.youtube.com/embed/vJG698U2​Mvo?autoplay=1&widget_referrer=https%3​A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&start=0&enablejsap​i=1&origin=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.fark.com&​widgetid=1]

Why is the letter S painted on the wall twice? And what is the deal with the gorilla?


The gorilla is the point. Most people filter it out since they are focusing on the ball (hence the question about counting the passes). Of course once you see the gorilla you are on alert for it, so the video only works the first time.
 
2021-11-28 11:21:14 PM  
Cold-hearted orb that rules the night,
Removes the colors from our sight,
Red is grey and yellow white,
But we decide which is right,
And which is an illusion.
 
2021-11-29 2:15:22 AM  
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2021-11-29 8:23:49 AM  
The Larch.
 
2021-11-29 10:13:03 AM  
I remember in middle school a teacher showed us a black & white pixelated image that had about 16 pixels, said it was a face and asked us who it was. I immediately thought "Abraham Lincoln" but didn't say anything since it seemed so unlikely that I was actually recognizing him. But she showed an image with more pixels and it became obvious.  I still don't know how I picked that out. Maybe it was because there was an obvious beard.
 
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