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(Live Science)   Astronomers find a great barrier around the center of the galaxy, a god in need of a starship   (livescience.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Milky Way, cosmic rays, map of radioactive gamma-rays, Sun, center of the Milky Way, Supermassive black hole, galactic center, abundance of cosmic rays  
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1515 clicks; posted to STEM » on 21 Nov 2021 at 5:25 AM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-11-21 5:29:05 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-11-21 5:29:21 AM  
So they found the supermassive black holes version of a heliosphere?
 
2021-11-21 5:44:24 AM  
Can't get there without the Omega-4 Relay.  Asari out front should've told you.
 
2021-11-21 8:05:44 AM  
It's a Dyson Sphere.  Any barrier they find in space is automatically a Dyson Sphere.
 
2021-11-21 8:20:07 AM  
Coriolis effect, no big deal.
 
2021-11-21 8:25:21 AM  
FTA: "We don't have any idea what is generating all those cosmic rays"

Also FTA: "It's probably Sagittarius A*, the super-massive black hole at the center of the galaxy"

FTA: "We don't know what's stopping inward high energy particles"

Also FTA: "Combined magnetic fields from all the stars densely packed around the galactic core, just like the Sun's shields the Solar system".

Pick a lane.
 
2021-11-21 8:43:16 AM  
"We don't know what is happening here. We need to make more observations and test them" is a perfectly acceptable position to take.
 
2021-11-21 8:47:40 AM  

F-14Tomcat: "We don't know what is happening here. We need to make more observations and test them" is a perfectly acceptable position to take.


Indeed.  Though it reads more like they're 95% sure and want to confirm.  Which is also very reasonable.
 
2021-11-21 9:56:49 AM  
" It is a dense and dusty place, holding more than 1 million times as many stars per light-year as the entire solar system - "

Dickens got paid by the word too but at least he was worth it.
 
2021-11-21 10:45:17 AM  

F-14Tomcat: "We don't know what is happening here. We need to make more observations and test them" is a perfectly acceptable position to take.


That what they want you to think. What  they actually want is money to make observations and test them
 
2021-11-21 10:59:53 AM  

Hassan Ben Sobr: " It is a dense and dusty place, holding more than 1 million times as many stars per light-year as the entire solar system - "

Dickens got paid by the word too but at least he was worth it.


So 1 million times... 1? That's math I'd expect the public can do.
 
2021-11-21 11:41:49 AM  

Quantumbunny: Hassan Ben Sobr: " It is a dense and dusty place, holding more than 1 million times as many stars per light-year as the entire solar system - "

Dickens got paid by the word too but at least he was worth it.

So 1 million times... 1? That's math I'd expect the public can do.


I think that you have to multiply by the number of light years of the entire solar system. Or subtract a year, if that's a minus sign rather than a hyphen.
 
2021-11-21 11:47:32 AM  

Quantumbunny: Hassan Ben Sobr: " It is a dense and dusty place, holding more than 1 million times as many stars per light-year as the entire solar system - "

Dickens got paid by the word too but at least he was worth it.

So 1 million times... 1? That's math I'd expect the public can do.


no one measures anything by "stars per light year". its a science sounding bullshiat sentence
 
2021-11-21 12:18:16 PM  
Cosmic rays can get out of the galactic center, but have a hard time getting in.

Rush-hour traffic jam?
 
2021-11-21 2:37:08 PM  

WelldeadLink: Quantumbunny: Hassan Ben Sobr: " It is a dense and dusty place, holding more than 1 million times as many stars per light-year as the entire solar system - "

Dickens got paid by the word too but at least he was worth it.

So 1 million times... 1? That's math I'd expect the public can do.

I think that you have to multiply by the number of light years of the entire solar system. Or subtract a year, if that's a minus sign rather than a hyphen.


If that's what they really want, proxima centuri is the nearest star to us and is over 4 light years away. If we're making a circle, the area around us in therefore about 50 sq light years.

But since the solar system is around 1/3400 the of that... (radius of 40AU). That's ~.00147 stars per our solar system light years?  I don't know how to interpret these units. What the fark does that mean? Is our solar system average? Tiny? Dense? Huge?
 
2021-11-21 4:45:08 PM  

Quantumbunny: WelldeadLink: Quantumbunny: Hassan Ben Sobr: " It is a dense and dusty place, holding more than 1 million times as many stars per light-year as the entire solar system - "

Dickens got paid by the word too but at least he was worth it.

So 1 million times... 1? That's math I'd expect the public can do.

I think that you have to multiply by the number of light years of the entire solar system. Or subtract a year, if that's a minus sign rather than a hyphen.

If that's what they really want, proxima centuri is the nearest star to us and is over 4 light years away. If we're making a circle, the area around us in therefore about 50 sq light years.

But since the solar system is around 1/3400 the of that... (radius of 40AU). That's ~.00147 stars per our solar system light years?  I don't know how to interpret these units. What the fark does that mean? Is our solar system average? Tiny? Dense? Huge?


Your math is off. Think cubic light-years. Anyways, depending on who you ask, the radius is between 1 ly and 3 ly. Assume 2 ly and we get about 64 cubic ly. Which doesn't really matter, because a million stars in that volume would be about 100 stars over 6 light years, or about .06 ly rough distance between them. That's about forty times the distance to Pluto, so... Space is big.

/Lots of guestimation, but probably within an order of a magnitude.
//That density not good for planets.
 
2021-11-21 5:14:28 PM  

Quantumbunny: Hassan Ben Sobr: " It is a dense and dusty place, holding more than 1 million times as many stars per light-year as the entire solar system - "

Dickens got paid by the word too but at least he was worth it.

So 1 million times... 1? That's math I'd expect the public can do.


Came to say this. Sloppy writing, or an ignorant writer.
 
2021-11-21 5:20:59 PM  

lifeslammer: Quantumbunny: Hassan Ben Sobr: " It is a dense and dusty place, holding more than 1 million times as many stars per light-year as the entire solar system - "

Dickens got paid by the word too but at least he was worth it.

So 1 million times... 1? That's math I'd expect the public can do.

no one measures anything by "stars per light year". its a science sounding bullshiat sentence


I have always assumed that it was used for stellar nurseries where there are a large amount of young stars in relatively speaking " small area " .
 
2021-11-21 5:22:12 PM  

Unsung_Hero: FTA: "We don't have any idea what is generating all those cosmic rays"

Also FTA: "It's probably Sagittarius A*, the super-massive black hole at the center of the galaxy"

FTA: "We don't know what's stopping inward high energy particles"

Also FTA: "Combined magnetic fields from all the stars densely packed around the galactic core, just like the Sun's shields the Solar system".

Pick a lane.


no

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-11-21 6:37:43 PM  

F-14Tomcat: "We don't know what is happening here. We need to make more observations and test them" is a perfectly acceptable position to take.


It is. We used to call that "Bob", as Bob was always saying it, and our just saying "Bob" saved time and was always funny... Except in our case it was, "We do not know the cause of the anomaly. Further testing is required." Bob.
 
2021-11-22 8:45:53 AM  
It's a wonderful and frustrating time to be alive.  We *know* there's fantastic stuff out there.  we can see it, detect it, measure it, etc.  We just can't get TO it to finalize what we might suspect.  Probably won't happen for some time, if ever.

I've often wondered if we could regain the centuries we lost to religion tamping down science, where we would be now.

(probably dead because we'd find more wonderful things to kill ourselves with)
 
2021-11-22 8:53:12 AM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size

no shiat. it's in the pilot episode
 
2021-11-22 9:10:38 AM  

some_beer_drinker: [i.pinimg.com image 600x450]
no shiat. it's in the pilot episode


why didn't they just go down?
 
2021-11-22 11:20:44 AM  
and the toxic waste things hits.
MORE radio-actives in sun-building. and planets. (4th gen)
AND radioactive galaxy cores.

which adds up to a sterile universe in...
 
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