Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Live Science)   And the stratosphere is getting LARRRRGER   (livescience.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Atmosphere, climate change, Stratosphere, Climate, greenhouse gases, new study shows, Ozone layer, Earth's atmosphere  
•       •       •

478 clicks; posted to STEM » on 16 Nov 2021 at 10:09 AM (27 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



7 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-11-16 9:35:35 AM  
But what would the pH of the soil be in the core of a drill bit that dug through a two billion year old dinosaur carcass?

/obscure?
 
2021-11-16 10:35:36 AM  
Produced gasses..  not existing gasses that are compressed and released, but gasses that are chemically produced..  CO2 from fermentation.. rising sea levels are also involved.  Released carbon..
 
2021-11-16 10:52:31 AM  

OlderGuy: Produced gasses..  not existing gasses that are compressed and released, but gasses that are chemically produced..  CO2 from fermentation.. rising sea levels are also involved.  Released carbon..


CO2 makes up 0.04% of the atmosphere. The extra volume of the gas itself is much less important than its thermal effect. Plus, when you burn hydrocarbons you are taking oxygen out of the atmosphere. Every CO2 molecule is a 1:1 swap with O2, but oxygen also combines with the hydrogen to produce water vapor which soon condenses out and falls as rain. It's a net reduction of gas molecules in the atmosphere.
 
2021-11-16 1:26:36 PM  

OlderGuy: Produced gasses..  not existing gasses that are compressed and released, but gasses that are chemically produced..  CO2 from fermentation.. rising sea levels are also involved.  Released carbon..


Wut?
 
2021-11-16 1:54:26 PM  

Ivo Shandor: OlderGuy: Produced gasses..  not existing gasses that are compressed and released, but gasses that are chemically produced..  CO2 from fermentation.. rising sea levels are also involved.  Released carbon..

CO2 makes up 0.04% of the atmosphere. The extra volume of the gas itself is much less important than its thermal effect. Plus, when you burn hydrocarbons you are taking oxygen out of the atmosphere. Every CO2 molecule is a 1:1 swap with O2, but oxygen also combines with the hydrogen to produce water vapor which soon condenses out and falls as rain. It's a net reduction of gas molecules in the atmosphere.


CO2 has volume..  other produced gasses, including various refrigeration gasses, also have volume... gotta go somewhere....
 
2021-11-16 2:06:05 PM  

OlderGuy: Produced gasses..  not existing gasses that are compressed and released, but gasses that are chemically produced..  CO2 from fermentation.. rising sea levels are also involved.  Released carbon..


Tropospheric expansion 1980-2020: ~676 feet

Sea-level rise 1980-2020: ~3 inches

And as noted, burning carbon actually reduces the number of molecules in the atmosphere.
 
2021-11-17 4:15:40 AM  
So....does this increase the chanses that we will start losing tiny bits of atmosphere if it grows enough or not
 
Displayed 7 of 7 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.