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(Medical Xpress)   A blood biomarker has been identified that predicts type 2 diabetes years and years before you get fat or have the urge to grow the walrus 'stache   (medicalxpress.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Obesity, Blood sugar, large study, higher levels of the protein follistatin, diagnostic tool, clinical data, Lund University, German Tubingen Diabetes Family Study  
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306 clicks; posted to STEM » on 11 Nov 2021 at 10:17 AM (27 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-11-11 8:20:22 AM  
Pretty easy to avoid the type 2 beetuss no matter what your biomarkers are.  Don't be obese.  Not that hard.
 
2021-11-11 10:23:17 AM  

The Googles Do Nothing: Pretty easy to avoid the type 2 beetuss no matter what your biomarkers are.  Don't be obese.  Not that hard.


I see you haven't read all of the excuses people make around here about why they have no choice to not only eat garbage processed food, but in quantities that would choke a bison.
 
2021-11-11 10:25:55 AM  
What is a walrus stache?
 
2021-11-11 10:33:44 AM  
GREAT NEWS! YOUR HEALTH INSURANCE HAS BEEN CANCELLED!!
 
2021-11-11 10:51:26 AM  

The Googles Do Nothing: Pretty easy to avoid the type 2 beetuss no matter what your biomarkers are.  Don't be obese.  Not that hard.


While Type 2 diabetes is highly correlated with being obese, it isn't the only correlation and is not directly caused by obesity. Being obese doesn't mean you will develop diabetes any more than being thin means you're healthy. If you are genetically disposed to developing diabetes, you're genetics don't care how fat you are.

If you really care about your health, you'll drop the idea that just being thin alone has anything to do with your health and you'll start to work on being healthy.
 
2021-11-11 11:03:28 AM  

SMB2811: While Type 2 diabetes is highly correlated with being obese, it isn't the only correlation and is not directly caused by obesity. Being obese doesn't mean you will develop diabetes any more than being thin means you're healthy. If you are genetically disposed to developing diabetes, you're genetics don't care how fat you are.


Hey Google, what's the main cause of type 2 diabetes?

Although not everyone with type 2 diabetes is overweight, obesity and an inactive lifestyle are two of the most common causes of type 2 diabetes. These things are responsible for about 90% to 95% of diabetes cases in the United States.
https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/diabetes-causes

Just one link among many that say the exact same thing.

So yes, while you're technically correct (the best kind of correct), lifestyle choices are predominantly to blame for the huge explosion in diabetes.
 
2021-11-11 11:23:07 AM  

The Googles Do Nothing: Pretty easy to avoid the type 2 beetuss no matter what your biomarkers are.  Don't be obese.  Not that hard.


This will be worth a fortune to insurance companies to know who to not provide coverage to and avoid expensive treatment in the future.
 
2021-11-11 11:33:48 AM  
My father was thin his entire life, but he developed type 2 diabetes anyway. No, he was not terribly active. He was like most middle aged+ guys. The occasional walk, but nothing too strenuous. Could he have done more? Sure. But he nailed the healthy diet (something the vast majority can't do) and it didn't make a difference.

I'm thin, but my doctor checks my A1C anyway given my family history.

Now the real question: Do I want a blood test to tell me years in advance that I'm going to develop a disease and there isn't anything I can do about it? No. No, I don't. I'd really like to keep my life insurance and such. I exercise and eat a healthy diet. Why worry about this?
 
2021-11-11 11:55:56 AM  

bluefelix: My father was thin his entire life, but he developed type 2 diabetes anyway. No, he was not terribly active. He was like most middle aged+ guys. The occasional walk, but nothing too strenuous. Could he have done more? Sure. But he nailed the healthy diet (something the vast majority can't do) and it didn't make a difference.

I'm thin, but my doctor checks my A1C anyway given my family history.

Now the real question: Do I want a blood test to tell me years in advance that I'm going to develop a disease and there isn't anything I can do about it? No. No, I don't. I'd really like to keep my life insurance and such. I exercise and eat a healthy diet. Why worry about this?


Depends on if you think there are things you can actively do. There's evidence a very low carb diet can help. If so, going 'Keto' may actually work for you. Or it might give you heart disease in 20 years.  fark if I know.
 
2021-11-11 12:06:41 PM  

bluefelix: My father was thin his entire life, but he developed type 2 diabetes anyway. No, he was not terribly active. He was like most middle aged+ guys. The occasional walk, but nothing too strenuous. Could he have done more? Sure. But he nailed the healthy diet (something the vast majority can't do) and it didn't make a difference.


We've found out that activity level plays a really significant role.  Like your dad, you can be a normal weight and still develop diseases that are preventable by lifestyle choices.

Take osteoporosis, for example.  Are there genetic factors?  Sure.  Dietary factors?  Of course.  But a sedentary lifestyle plays a role as well because exercise assists in bone development, and the lack of exercise makes likely to lose the calcium in your bones.  So you can have good genes and eat a healthy diet, but if you sit most of the time, you can still develop osteoporosis.

It's one of those things we see most drastically in astronauts.  Take away gravity and they lose around 1% of their bone mineral density every month because they're bones aren't being worked as hard.
 
2021-11-11 12:07:39 PM  

The Crepes of Wrath: they're bones


Sheesh.  Their bones.
 
2021-11-11 12:11:14 PM  

The Crepes of Wrath: SMB2811: While Type 2 diabetes is highly correlated with being obese, it isn't the only correlation and is not directly caused by obesity. Being obese doesn't mean you will develop diabetes any more than being thin means you're healthy. If you are genetically disposed to developing diabetes, you're genetics don't care how fat you are.

Hey Google, what's the main cause of type 2 diabetes?

Although not everyone with type 2 diabetes is overweight, obesity and an inactive lifestyle are two of the most common causes of type 2 diabetes. These things are responsible for about 90% to 95% of diabetes cases in the United States.
https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/diabetes-causes

Just one link among many that say the exact same thing.

So yes, while you're technically correct (the best kind of correct), lifestyle choices are predominantly to blame for the huge explosion in diabetes.


Industrialized food and no time left to prep / really cook on a daily basis unless you're rich, you mean.
 
2021-11-11 12:12:11 PM  

labman: The Googles Do Nothing: Pretty easy to avoid the type 2 beetuss no matter what your biomarkers are.  Don't be obese.  Not that hard.

This will be worth a fortune to insurance companies to know who to not provide coverage to and avoid expensive treatment in the future.


YUUUUUP.

And anyone saying otherwise is either an idiot or a shill.
 
2021-11-11 12:13:38 PM  

labman: The Googles Do Nothing: Pretty easy to avoid the type 2 beetuss no matter what your biomarkers are.  Don't be obese.  Not that hard.

This will be worth a fortune to insurance companies to know who to not provide coverage to and avoid expensive treatment in the future.


Forgot to add: all those folks that eagerly sent their DNA to ancestry services are in for a cruel, expensive shock.
 
2021-11-11 12:17:29 PM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: Industrialized food and no time left to prep / really cook on a daily basis unless you're rich, you mean.


Ah, that old excuse.  I'm not rich (far from it), but even when I lived in Philadelphia with a long commute every day (60-90 minutes), I still managed to cook a dinner from scratch every night of the week.  Because it was important to me.

The average American spends 4 hours every day watching TV, and 5+ hours on a smartphone (yes, I looked them up).  Is this one of those issues where everyone considers themselves atypical, just like those discussions we have here from time to time about how BMI (flawed though it is) doesn't apply to them?

We want convenience, so we choose convenience.
 
2021-11-11 12:22:59 PM  

Valter: What is a walrus stache?


Shut up and eat your oatmeal.
 
2021-11-11 12:23:40 PM  
Don't worry, it won't stop people from acting morally superior about it all. The article can literally tell some people that they're full of shiat and then bust a nut on their face and they'll still be like "but my preconceived notions of superiority" and keep on hurping.
 
2021-11-11 12:25:37 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-11-11 12:47:41 PM  

The Crepes of Wrath: I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: Industrialized food and no time left to prep / really cook on a daily basis unless you're rich, you mean.

Ah, that old excuse.  I'm not rich (far from it), but even when I lived in Philadelphia with a long commute every day (60-90 minutes), I still managed to cook a dinner from scratch every night of the week.  Because it was important to me.

The average American spends 4 hours every day watching TV, and 5+ hours on a smartphone (yes, I looked them up).  Is this one of those issues where everyone considers themselves atypical, just like those discussions we have here from time to time about how BMI (flawed though it is) doesn't apply to them?

We want convenience, so we choose convenience.


Well, I can tell shaming and judging other people is really important to you so, okay, you win.
 
2021-11-11 1:39:59 PM  

The Crepes of Wrath: The Crepes of Wrath: they're bones

Sheesh.  Their bones.


FTFY:

Alice In Chains - Them Bones (Official HD Video)
Youtube zTuD8k3JvxQ
 
2021-11-11 1:41:04 PM  
What did I do?

inquirer.comView Full Size
 
2021-11-11 3:42:51 PM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: The Crepes of Wrath: SMB2811: While Type 2 diabetes is highly correlated with being obese, it isn't the only correlation and is not directly caused by obesity. Being obese doesn't mean you will develop diabetes any more than being thin means you're healthy. If you are genetically disposed to developing diabetes, you're genetics don't care how fat you are.

Hey Google, what's the main cause of type 2 diabetes?

Although not everyone with type 2 diabetes is overweight, obesity and an inactive lifestyle are two of the most common causes of type 2 diabetes. These things are responsible for about 90% to 95% of diabetes cases in the United States.
https://www.webmd.com/diabetes/diabetes-causes

Just one link among many that say the exact same thing.

So yes, while you're technically correct (the best kind of correct), lifestyle choices are predominantly to blame for the huge explosion in diabetes.

Industrialized food and no time left to prep / really cook on a daily basis unless you're rich, you mean.


Considering what is, to me, the incomprehensible amount of time that statisticians report that the *average* American spends on the couch motionlessly staring at the glowing rectangle... I'm calling bullshiat on the idea that they have no time to cook.

For poorer folks, money to cook is absolutely an issue because real food costs more than super-processed garbage.

But don't try and tell me that when the average person sits on their ass in front of the tv for 4+ hours a day, in an average household that has two adults, that nobody can find any time to cook something healthier than sugar dissolved in milk for breakfast, 1500 calorie greaseburgers for lunch and 2500 calories of greasy-ass pizza for dinner.
 
2021-11-11 4:35:38 PM  

erik-k: For poorer folks, money to cook is absolutely an issue because real food costs more than super-processed garbage.


Even that's mostly a myth.  It's only true if you look at a single metric -- calories -- but it tends to fall apart when you look at other factors.  The biggest is satiety, the feeling of fullness that comes from eating a meal.  Real food satisfies your hunger better than processed/ultra-processed/fast food, so people end up eating more calories to satisfy their hunger, which means they spend more money to do so.

Then there's also the less obvious costs, like having to buy clothing in larger and larger sizes as people gain weight from a processed-heavy diet, plus all of the medical expenses that come from gradually worsening health.
 
2021-11-11 4:37:03 PM  
And FWIW.  The author is in England, but there are plenty of similar articles in the US.

https://theconversation.com/myth-healthy-food-is-more-expensive-than-unhealthy-food-101213
 
2021-11-11 5:12:13 PM  

The Crepes of Wrath: I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: Industrialized food and no time left to prep / really cook on a daily basis unless you're rich, you mean.

Ah, that old excuse.  I'm not rich (far from it), but even when I lived in Philadelphia with a long commute every day (60-90 minutes), I still managed to cook a dinner from scratch every night of the week.  Because it was important to me.

The average American spends 4 hours every day watching TV, and 5+ hours on a smartphone (yes, I looked them up).  Is this one of those issues where everyone considers themselves atypical, just like those discussions we have here from time to time about how BMI (flawed though it is) doesn't apply to them?

We want convenience, so we choose convenience.


It doesn't even need to be that extreme.  Scrambled eggs in the microwave 2 minutes ($0.5) + a pouch of frozen vegetables  2 minutes ($0.5) + A piece of fruit 0 minutes ($1) + a glass of milk 0 minutes ($0.25).  Voila, healthy dinner is served in 5 minutes for $2.25.

/2 eggs
//the pouch of frozen vegetables is multiserve, so you eat it over a few meals
///add in some whole grain pasta or potato for filler as needed which maybe brings you up to $3 and a few more minutes, but you can cook those while you eat the other things so they don't actually add any time
 
2021-11-11 6:35:20 PM  

The Googles Do Nothing: Pretty easy to avoid the type 2 beetuss no matter what your biomarkers are.  Don't be obese.  Not that hard.


You've got it the wrong way around. Gaining weight is easy. Check those BMI charts, you too could reach the obese level with no effort at all.
 
2021-11-11 6:36:02 PM  
You should get your A1C checked every year or two as part of your regular checkup, just in case. Better to catch it early.
 
2021-11-11 7:16:49 PM  

bluefelix: Now the real question: Do I want a blood test to tell me years in advance that I'm going to develop a disease and there isn't anything I can do about it? No. No, I don't. I'd really like to keep my life insurance and such. I exercise and eat a healthy diet. Why worry about this?


Agreed. Someone was a proposing a test for Alzheimers disease before symptoms arise some while back. Why would I want to know that in advance?

If you tell me I have five years to live due to some untreatable disease, all that is going to do mess with my head and ruin the last five years of my life. I have thought this over, and I've decided I'd rather not know. Granted I'll find out once symptoms hit, but before then, don't want to go looking for a problem.

My GP loves tests, I guess he gets paid so I can see his motivation. But I don't see any point in a test for something there is no medication for. He tells me to eat a healthy diet and exercise (don't all doctors do this?) and it's the message that gets bombarded at me, and everyone else, from every angle, all the time, as it is. Can we just accept I am already doing the best I can already. There's no need for me to go forking out an extra few hundred dollars on top of the usual fee when the result is only going to be that my GP will say the same things again.

Much like conspiracy theories get used as comfort by people in a chaotic world, some find comfort in the idea that diet and exercise will let them them avoid declining health and death. It doesn't. Everyone is going to die, and sometimes in a slow and painful way. Even those healthy, skinny, fit and thoroughly exercised people. Even the most arrogant, holier-than-thou athletes, who only eat food grown and harvested by fair trade organic fairies in an anti-climate change garden, have been known to still get cancer and die early. It does take the wind out of their sails a bit when they realise this the hard way.
 
2021-11-12 6:53:15 AM  

I am Tom Joad's Complete Lack of Surprise: Well, I can tell shaming and judging other people is really important to you


I realize that probably no one is reading this thread anymore, but that's okay.  I still want to address this in the hope, unlikely though it is, that I can motivate someone to improve their health.

I'm probably one of the few people on this site not interested in shaming people.  I've talked many times here about my own health -- how I used to be morbidly obese, and how I eventually ended up with cancer because of it.  Unlike most people, it seems, I used that as motivation to clean up my act.  After that diagnosis and surgery, I decided that I was no longer going to be a victim of my own poor day-to-day health choices.  Without medical assistance (other than Dr. Google), I lost almost 300 pounds to get down to a normal, healthy weight for the first time in my life (I was overweight by the time I went to kindergarten, in a time when few people and even fewer children were overweight).  And I did it by studying the science of health/weight loss (using the aforementioned Dr. Google), which involved dispelling all of the bullsh*t myths we believe that are, in the end, just excuses that justify the choices we want to make.  Myths like the one you told, that only rich people have time to cook, and that our food system is somehow to blame.

And after hitting my goal weight, I finally started seeing a doctor again for the first time in almost 40 years (other than the 5 years from cancer diagnosis through the followup exams).  After my appointment with her over Zoom, in which I told her how I lost the weight and continue to maintain it, she congratulated me on "following the science" to improve my health, and that if more people did what I did, she'd probably be out of a job.  And she wasn't exaggerating because, in the pre-pandemic world, almost 70% of the US health care system was dedicated to treating conditions that are largely (though not entirely) preventable by making better lifestyle choices.

Yes, some people are losers in the genetic lottery and may develop a serious illness even though they make great health choices every day.  That's always been the case, even before our weight began to balloon.  But most of us are seemingly unwilling to admit that we have agency.  We have the ability to improve our own situation concerning our health.

The pandemic pointed out just how vulnerable we've become, because after the elderly, the #2 target from the beginning has been people who are already unhealthy, with obesity and those day-to-day health choices being implicated in most of those.

Hearing something you don't want to hear isn't shaming.
 
2021-11-12 10:40:27 AM  
Type 2 diabetes isn't always due to being overweight.   I developed it after my BMI went from 20.4 to 23.5 after I broke my knee and couldn't exercise for several months.  23.5 is still well within the "normal" range.
 
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