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(NPR)   The Ric Romero Institute of Noshiat & Sherlock has completed its exhaustive study on whether there's a massive discrepancy between NCAA spending on men's versus women's sports   (npr.org) divider line
    More: Obvious, Basketball, National Collegiate Athletic Association, championship events, NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship, men's championships, Gender, Tuesday night, law firm of Kaplan Hecker  
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164 clicks; posted to Sports » and Main » on 27 Oct 2021 at 8:50 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-10-27 9:24:15 PM  
I'll just rewrite the headline of the article:

The NCAA's focus on profits means far more gets spent on men's championships because well yeah that makes sense.
 
2021-10-27 9:37:43 PM  
If revenues weren't reinvested in the sport that generates them, there would be far less emphasis on using college sports to generate revenue.

Which I think would be a good thing - college sports are the worst aspect of academia, IMHO.
 
2021-10-27 10:50:25 PM  
But if you include those who are prohibited from receiving support at all - mostly men- the numbers would look vastly different.

Also, no comment on the TBI/CTE issue, disproportionately suffered by those with the most hurdles in life.

It's more complicated than these simple numbers. There is unjust disparity, but there are other issues that can't go inside for a full report
 
2021-10-28 12:08:51 AM  

Enigmamf: If revenues weren't reinvested in the sport that generates them, there would be far less emphasis on using college sports to generate revenue.

Which I think would be a good thing - college sports are the worst aspect of academia, IMHO.


I used to wonder why they even bothered with the charade of full ride scholarships for illiterate athletes at colleges that are putatively there to educate. why not just create schools that are only there for sports and have no pretense of education. then I realized the SEC existed so that has already happened.
 
2021-10-28 12:25:57 AM  

chucknasty: Enigmamf: If revenues weren't reinvested in the sport that generates them, there would be far less emphasis on using college sports to generate revenue.

Which I think would be a good thing - college sports are the worst aspect of academia, IMHO.

I used to wonder why they even bothered with the charade of full ride scholarships for illiterate athletes at colleges that are putatively there to educate. why not just create schools that are only there for sports and have no pretense of education. then I realized the SEC existed so that has already happened.


They keep Vandy around just to be able to argue that point with you.
 
2021-10-28 1:53:53 AM  

chucknasty: Enigmamf: If revenues weren't reinvested in the sport that generates them, there would be far less emphasis on using college sports to generate revenue.

Which I think would be a good thing - college sports are the worst aspect of academia, IMHO.

I used to wonder why they even bothered with the charade of full ride scholarships for illiterate athletes at colleges that are putatively there to educate. why not just create schools that are only there for sports and have no pretense of education. then I realized the SEC existed so that has already happened.


While this may be true for some stars, the vast majority that go from college to the NFL, do not get the Mega contracts. These players are usually 4 year graduates and not in just communications or something like that.
 
2021-10-28 10:36:38 AM  

phimuskapsi: chucknasty: Enigmamf: If revenues weren't reinvested in the sport that generates them, there would be far less emphasis on using college sports to generate revenue.

Which I think would be a good thing - college sports are the worst aspect of academia, IMHO.

I used to wonder why they even bothered with the charade of full ride scholarships for illiterate athletes at colleges that are putatively there to educate. why not just create schools that are only there for sports and have no pretense of education. then I realized the SEC existed so that has already happened.

While this may be true for some stars, the vast majority that go from college to the NFL, do not get the Mega contracts. These players are usually 4 year graduates and not in just communications or something like that.


I'd argue the sports that bring in the most revenue, men's basketball and football, have a significantly lower percentage of graduates than the other sports.
 
2021-10-28 11:11:02 AM  

DRTFA: phimuskapsi: chucknasty: Enigmamf: If revenues weren't reinvested in the sport that generates them, there would be far less emphasis on using college sports to generate revenue.

Which I think would be a good thing - college sports are the worst aspect of academia, IMHO.

I used to wonder why they even bothered with the charade of full ride scholarships for illiterate athletes at colleges that are putatively there to educate. why not just create schools that are only there for sports and have no pretense of education. then I realized the SEC existed so that has already happened.

While this may be true for some stars, the vast majority that go from college to the NFL, do not get the Mega contracts. These players are usually 4 year graduates and not in just communications or something like that.

I'd argue the sports that bring in the most revenue, men's basketball and football, have a significantly lower percentage of graduates than the other sports.


While sort of true, it isn't significantly lower.

You have to remember that there are just about 1700 athletes in the NFL, and about half of those have full degrees - higher than any other professional sports league. The rest of the leagues recruit earlier, and thus degrees are not as likely.

"The federal graduation rate, however, remains the only measure to compare student-athletes with the general student body. Using this measure, student-athletes graduate at the same rate as the student body: 69%. Both college athletes and their peers in the student body increased by 1 point in the past year.

In all major demographic groups except for white males, student-athletes graduated at higher rates than their peers in the student body (white males graduate at the same rate as their student body counterparts). Black male student-athletes had a 56% federal graduation rate, while 44% of Black males in the student body graduated. Black female student-athletes also outpaced their counterparts in the student body by 12 percentage points (66% to 54%).

Even though the rates in men's basketball and FBS football trail the rates for all males in the student body, the rates for Black student-athletes in those sports are higher than Black males in the student body by 4 percentage points in basketball and 7 percentage points in FBS football.
 
2021-10-28 11:11:29 AM  
 
2021-10-28 12:16:41 PM  

phimuskapsi: DRTFA: phimuskapsi: chucknasty: Enigmamf: If revenues weren't reinvested in the sport that generates them, there would be far less emphasis on using college sports to generate revenue.

Which I think would be a good thing - college sports are the worst aspect of academia, IMHO.

I used to wonder why they even bothered with the charade of full ride scholarships for illiterate athletes at colleges that are putatively there to educate. why not just create schools that are only there for sports and have no pretense of education. then I realized the SEC existed so that has already happened.

While this may be true for some stars, the vast majority that go from college to the NFL, do not get the Mega contracts. These players are usually 4 year graduates and not in just communications or something like that.

I'd argue the sports that bring in the most revenue, men's basketball and football, have a significantly lower percentage of graduates than the other sports.

While sort of true, it isn't significantly lower.

You have to remember that there are just about 1700 athletes in the NFL, and about half of those have full degrees - higher than any other professional sports league. The rest of the leagues recruit earlier, and thus degrees are not as likely.

"The federal graduation rate, however, remains the only measure to compare student-athletes with the general student body. Using this measure, student-athletes graduate at the same rate as the student body: 69%. Both college athletes and their peers in the student body increased by 1 point in the past year.

In all major demographic groups except for white males, student-athletes graduated at higher rates than their peers in the student body (white males graduate at the same rate as their student body counterparts). Black male student-athletes had a 56% federal graduation rate, while 44% of Black males in the student body graduated. Black female student-athletes also outpaced their counterparts in the student body by 12 percentage points (66% to 54%).

Even though the rates in men's basketball and FBS football trail the rates for all males in the student body, the rates for Black student-athletes in those sports are higher than Black males in the student body by 4 percentage points in basketball and 7 percentage points in FBS football.


My preconceived notion was wrong.  Not the first time...
 
2021-10-28 2:02:39 PM  

DRTFA: My preconceived notion was wrong.  Not the first time...


If you think about it, it makes sense. NCAA has strict requirements, so you have a ton of tutors and mentors for the student athletes that wouldn't be as available to the rest of the student body. That money that schools drag in from TV does go to athlete education in many ways, from the classes and top notch teachers you get a schools with a big endowment, to the private instruction they provide.
 
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