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(NYPost)   How many rocket scientists does it take to fix a SpaceX rocket toilet?   (nypost.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, International Space Station, Kennedy Space Center, NASA, urine tube, Dragon capsule, Commander Raja Chari, spilled urine, floor panels  
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478 clicks; posted to STEM » on 27 Oct 2021 at 10:35 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



24 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-10-27 9:51:22 AM  
Shiatters clogged...

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2021-10-27 10:56:15 AM  
Both of them.
 
2021-10-27 11:04:54 AM  
"Rocket Toilet" sounds kind of frightening, like "explosive diarhhea."
 
DVD
2021-10-27 11:17:42 AM  
At least this particular "news venue" isn't the first to report on the issue.  I'm glad that Hunter Biden's 20 or 30 laptops from a Delaware shop can take a breather so that we can get updates on hygiene issues for astronauts.
 
2021-10-27 11:21:11 AM  
This toilet problem has been covered more than the last 10 space launches combined. I guess people love poo and pee stories...
 
2021-10-27 11:23:53 AM  
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2021-10-27 11:42:28 AM  

Sasquach: This toilet problem has been covered more than the last 10 space launches combined. I guess people love poo and pee stories...


That, and it's one of those engineering things that you can both understand and that becomes more complex every time you think about it.

Toilets are simple- waste fall in bowl, water carry it away.  Except nothing falls in space.  The solution for guys and urine is obvious, except that you don't want stray urine floating around, so how do you recover every drop?  (Not just because of ick, but because you don't want conductive liquids around electronics).

For women it gets tougher, but you can at least figure out some sort of vacuum attachment with cleanup wipes

Poop?  Suddenly it's really, really hard to figure out how things are going to work.  You don't want it floating around under any circumstances. (See Apollo 10)   It comes in varying levels of hardness, so you need to be able to handle everything from near liquid to rabbit pellets.  Water keeps the smell down on earth, but you can't have that in space.  You're going to need some sort of vacuum, but how does that work and stay reasonably clean?

Plus, you don't have a natural water supply in space, and water is freaking heavy so you want to carry the minimum possible.  That means if you're up there for more than a week or so you can't be wasting water in excrement- you need to be reclaiming it on the fly.  And you *really* don't want that system to fail, so it better be 100% reliable.

Poop in space is funny until you realize just how difficult it is
 
DVD
2021-10-27 11:57:24 AM  

Glockenspiel Hero: Sasquach: This toilet problem has been covered more than the last 10 space launches combined. I guess people love poo and pee stories...

That, and it's one of those engineering things that you can both understand and that becomes more complex every time you think about it.

Toilets are simple- waste fall in bowl, water carry it away.  Except nothing falls in space.  The solution for guys and urine is obvious, except that you don't want stray urine floating around, so how do you recover every drop?  (Not just because of ick, but because you don't want conductive liquids around electronics).

For women it gets tougher, but you can at least figure out some sort of vacuum attachment with cleanup wipes

Poop?  Suddenly it's really, really hard to figure out how things are going to work.  You don't want it floating around under any circumstances. (See Apollo 10)   It comes in varying levels of hardness, so you need to be able to handle everything from near liquid to rabbit pellets.  Water keeps the smell down on earth, but you can't have that in space.  You're going to need some sort of vacuum, but how does that work and stay reasonably clean?

Plus, you don't have a natural water supply in space, and water is freaking heavy so you want to carry the minimum possible.  That means if you're up there for more than a week or so you can't be wasting water in excrement- you need to be reclaiming it on the fly.  And you *really* don't want that system to fail, so it better be 100% reliable.

Poop in space is funny until you realize just how difficult it is


____________________________________​__​____________________________

And now we have a new maxim for life!
 
2021-10-27 12:17:35 PM  

DVD: Glockenspiel Hero: Sasquach: This toilet problem has been covered more than the last 10 space launches combined. I guess people love poo and pee stories...

That, and it's one of those engineering things that you can both understand and that becomes more complex every time you think about it.

Toilets are simple- waste fall in bowl, water carry it away.  Except nothing falls in space.  The solution for guys and urine is obvious, except that you don't want stray urine floating around, so how do you recover every drop?  (Not just because of ick, but because you don't want conductive liquids around electronics).

For women it gets tougher, but you can at least figure out some sort of vacuum attachment with cleanup wipes

Poop?  Suddenly it's really, really hard to figure out how things are going to work.  You don't want it floating around under any circumstances. (See Apollo 10)   It comes in varying levels of hardness, so you need to be able to handle everything from near liquid to rabbit pellets.  Water keeps the smell down on earth, but you can't have that in space.  You're going to need some sort of vacuum, but how does that work and stay reasonably clean?

Plus, you don't have a natural water supply in space, and water is freaking heavy so you want to carry the minimum possible.  That means if you're up there for more than a week or so you can't be wasting water in excrement- you need to be reclaiming it on the fly.  And you *really* don't want that system to fail, so it better be 100% reliable.

Poop in space is funny until you realize just how difficult it is

______________________________________​____________________________

And now we have a new maxim for life!


I shall never forget the way
That Blood upon this awful day
Preserved us all from death.
He stood upon a little mound,
Cast his lethargic eyes around,
And said beneath his breath:
"Whatever happens we have got
A Maxim Pun, and they have not."
 
Juc
2021-10-27 12:35:51 PM  
Stuff like this makes me wonder what the stuff in blue origin looks like.
I'm sorta figuring it's all dildo themed, just one big ol' dildo fractal.
 
2021-10-27 1:11:29 PM  

Sasquach: This toilet problem has been covered more than the last 10 space launches combined. I guess people love poo and pee stories...


SpaceX was suspiciously secretive about their toilet, refusing to discuss it or reveal anything other than its general location even after its first crewed launch a year ago.
 
2021-10-27 1:24:08 PM  

falkone32: Sasquach: This toilet problem has been covered more than the last 10 space launches combined. I guess people love poo and pee stories...

SpaceX was suspiciously secretive about their toilet, refusing to discuss it or reveal anything other than its general location even after its first crewed launch a year ago.


One of the Inspiriation 4 crewmembers posted a pic. It appears to be a vacuum hose with some sort of absorbent membrane for initial contact with the user for number 1s, and a bucket, (presumably attached to the same hose), for number 2s. They don't seem to be innovating much in this area so far.
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2021-10-27 1:49:58 PM  
Mr. Wolowitz to Engineering, please. Mr. Wolowitz to Engineering.
 
2021-10-27 2:06:33 PM  

falkone32: Sasquach: This toilet problem has been covered more than the last 10 space launches combined. I guess people love poo and pee stories...

SpaceX was suspiciously secretive about their toilet, refusing to discuss it or reveal anything other than its general location even after its first crewed launch a year ago.


The shuttle toilette was a disaster, and NASA's response was typically "more potty training for astronauts".  One thing that was odd about the whole thing that it was about the only failure NASA ever had that Pravda didn't mock them endlessly about.  NASA wasn't sure if doing such would be "uncultured" or if Roscosmos (or whoever was behind the Soviet rocket program at the time) didn't want anyone looking into their own systems either (can't remember if we ever found out why).

Zero-gee toilets are hard.  NASA has put out call for designs before, and it remains an unsolved problem.
 
2021-10-27 2:12:38 PM  
Surely it would be easier to just figure out artificial gravity? It's been almost 60yrs since Apollo, it doesn't look like they are going to fix the toilet issue anytime soon!

/ And don't call me Shirley!
 
2021-10-27 2:15:42 PM  
Also...why don't we just attach a massive ring segment to the end of the ISS? And then over the years, 20-30yrs or whatever, keep adding new segments until we have a big circle? Each segment could be replaced and enlarged as needed until eventually the old ISS is sold off to a private hotel or something.

Space is hard and takes a long time. I'm sick of 2 and 6yr term politicians controlling a budget that should be 30-50yrs long
 
2021-10-27 2:32:55 PM  
SpaceX Rocket Toilet?! Now there's a band name in search of a music genre!!
 
2021-10-27 2:35:38 PM  
Why is the toilet the most interesting part of the spaceship?!
 
2021-10-27 3:16:30 PM  

yet_another_wumpus: falkone32: Sasquach: This toilet problem has been covered more than the last 10 space launches combined. I guess people love poo and pee stories...

SpaceX was suspiciously secretive about their toilet, refusing to discuss it or reveal anything other than its general location even after its first crewed launch a year ago.

The shuttle toilette was a disaster, and NASA's response was typically "more potty training for astronauts".  One thing that was odd about the whole thing that it was about the only failure NASA ever had that Pravda didn't mock them endlessly about.  NASA wasn't sure if doing such would be "uncultured" or if Roscosmos (or whoever was behind the Soviet rocket program at the time) didn't want anyone looking into their own systems either (can't remember if we ever found out why).

Zero-gee toilets are hard.  NASA has put out call for designs before, and it remains an unsolved problem.


And sadly the Skylab design before it was much better.  The shower idea didn't really work, but apparently the toilets (yeah, there were two of them) were pretty good.  As amazing as the engineering was, the Shuttle was a conception, design, and funding disaster.
 
2021-10-27 3:48:50 PM  
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2021-10-27 3:49:13 PM  

Sasquach: Why is the toilet the most interesting part of the spaceship?!


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2021-10-27 4:17:58 PM  
Boeing is still several years away from finding out how broken their toilet is in zero-G.
 
2021-10-27 5:10:19 PM  

Sasquach: Why is the toilet the most interesting part of the spaceship?!


Because everything else has been done competently, which means boring. Also, poop. Heh heh.
 
2021-10-28 12:54:32 AM  

Mad_Radhu: Boeing is still several years away from finding out how broken their toilet is in zero-G.


Wait til the humidity causes those valves to fail.
 
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