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(Electrek)   ZeroAvia Hindenburg under development   (electrek.co) divider line
    More: Interesting, Alaska Airlines, Horizon Air, Alaska Air Group, parent company of Alaska Airlines, Los Angeles International Airport, hydrogen-electric powertrain, Delta Air Lines, aviation parent company  
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480 clicks; posted to Business » on 26 Oct 2021 at 8:27 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



10 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-10-26 8:28:16 PM  
Still a safer plane than the 737 MAX
 
2021-10-26 9:15:48 PM  
I hope it's a good glider.
 
2021-10-26 9:36:55 PM  
Headline made me disappointed this wasn't about dirigibles.
 
2021-10-26 9:39:29 PM  
There's going to be a breakthrough here.  Today's gas-powered engines are a nightmare of heat management.  Admittedly I don't understand the boundary of piston and jet-powered engines.   But it will be an interesting next decade.
 
2021-10-26 10:54:43 PM  
But can you loop with it?
 
2021-10-26 11:40:27 PM  

Omnivorous: There's going to be a breakthrough here.  Today's gas-powered engines are a nightmare of heat management.  Admittedly I don't understand the boundary of piston and jet-powered engines.   But it will be an interesting next decade.


It will be interesting for sure. This is one of the few applications where hydrogen makes sense. The safety is pretty much there, too. The problem is the corrosive properties of it. I'm sure whoever is developing hydrogen planes will have figured this problem out, but because hydrogen loves to eat metal a lot of the components need to be replaced relatively quickly. The Toyota Mirai, for example, has to be entirely scrapped after just 10 years of use. Since airplanes need to fly for 20 or 30 years, this might be a big hurdle. I'm excited to see where things go.
 
2021-10-27 4:28:19 AM  

Omnivorous: There's going to be a breakthrough here.  Today's gas-powered engines are a nightmare of heat management.  Admittedly I don't understand the boundary of piston and jet-powered engines.   But it will be an interesting next decade.


Well, it is ELEKTREK which means that someone had to twist their arm to say anything good about hydrogen. People should also know that R and D on hydrogen and fuel cell and battery planes is pretty old. Pretty well the big companies do not want to bother with it. The smaller companies have a credibility gap to deal with.

It will be the next frontier for limiting transportation emissions. It will take time though.

I often think that new power plants are going be adopted first for freight to avoid running into safety issues and avoid getting shot down because of them. Unfortunately, freight often requires scale for the economic viability.
 
2021-10-27 4:33:44 AM  

Tchernobog: Headline made me disappointed this wasn't about dirigibles.


If it is about hydrogen, it is ALWAYS about dirigibles. Just like every article about Fukushima is about Godzilla, and every article about Taco Bell is about blown up toilets.

And once you see the connections, you figure out that every news story, at its very core, is about blown up toilets.

See....the plane uses hydrogen, hydrogen is in methane, methane comes from burritos, burritos come from Taco Bell, ... blown up toilets.

Plate o shrimp.
 
2021-10-27 6:15:33 AM  

Likwit: Omnivorous: There's going to be a breakthrough here.  Today's gas-powered engines are a nightmare of heat management.  Admittedly I don't understand the boundary of piston and jet-powered engines.   But it will be an interesting next decade.

It will be interesting for sure. This is one of the few applications where hydrogen makes sense. The safety is pretty much there, too. The problem is the corrosive properties of it. I'm sure whoever is developing hydrogen planes will have figured this problem out, but because hydrogen loves to eat metal a lot of the components need to be replaced relatively quickly. The Toyota Mirai, for example, has to be entirely scrapped after just 10 years of use. Since airplanes need to fly for 20 or 30 years, this might be a big hurdle. I'm excited to see where things go.


Airframes last 30+ years for commercial airliners depending on number of cycles. Engines tend to be replaced after 10+ years.

This is a really good way to go to market. Take an existing certified airframe the deHaviland and just swap out the engines. The FAA will just need to certify the engines for passenger flight.

The planes would really be ideal for Hawaiian airlines inter-island flights. Short distance, low passenger count and frequent flights. Where turbo props can compete with jet. And not really worried about carrying freight to supplement income.
 
2021-10-27 7:14:32 PM  

2fardownthread: Well, it is ELEKTREK which means that someone had to twist their arm to say anything good about hydrogen.


I reject the premise. Why do they need to say something good about hydrogen? They're primarily a website about EVs. As we know from the abject failures that were the Toyota Mirai, Hyundai Nexo, and Honda Whogivesashiat, hydrogen is a poor solution for passenger cars. This application is good for hydrogen, so they had nice things to say. Seems simple.
 
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