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(CNN)   Nearly half of American companies say that they don't offer enough compensation and benefits to attract and keep skilled workers   (cnn.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Consumer price index, Inflation, Austrian School, Price index, Macroeconomics, GDP deflator, Unemployment, Personal consumption expenditures price index  
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1433 clicks; posted to Business » on 25 Oct 2021 at 3:07 PM (29 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



39 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-10-25 12:35:06 PM  
Well played subby.

The best humor is based on truth and punches upward.
 
2021-10-25 12:56:27 PM  
My best friend just got his CDL because there are a lot of companies hiring.  He applied at at least a dozen companies.

Now, about two weeks later, only three have contacted him.

And one of those three keeps blowing him off as he tries to schedule an interview.
 
2021-10-25 12:56:59 PM  
If only there were some way to train people in becoming skilled workers.  If only.
 
2021-10-25 12:57:31 PM  

weddingsinger: My best friend just got his CDL because there are a lot of companies hiring.  He applied at at least a dozen companies.

Now, about two weeks later, only three have contacted him.

And one of those three keeps blowing him off as he tries to schedule an interview.


It's almost as if all this talk about a worker shortage is complete horse shiat.
 
2021-10-25 1:07:33 PM  
It's by design. That way they can fraudulently justify H1Bs.
 
2021-10-25 1:31:59 PM  
I have 45 years' experience.

I'm being offer $12/hour.
 
2021-10-25 1:36:36 PM  
The ultimate example is in fast food.  Are all the McDonald's fully staffed in your area?  But nobody else?

Drive past Burger King's with signs that say 'up to $13/hr' and 2 blocks down is McDonalds and its sign that says 'up to $18/hr'.  Gee, I wonder who they're gonna apply to.
 
2021-10-25 3:09:51 PM  
The problem often is job descriptions written too tightly, kicking out applicants that are close.
 
2021-10-25 3:09:52 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
Juc [TotalFark]
2021-10-25 3:12:49 PM  

weddingsinger: And one of those three keeps blowing him off as he tries to schedule an interview.


well that's one benefit I didn't expect them to offer in this day and age.
 
2021-10-25 3:17:46 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-10-25 3:22:20 PM  

Another Government Employee: The problem often is job descriptions written too tightly, kicking out applicants that are close.


Amazingly, this has recently sunk in with the HR department where I work. Some of the positions they list as needing a degree and years of experience for I could probably train a smart highschooler to do with two weeks of training.

We've also customized our software to the point that it's impossible to have useful experience with it unless you're already working for the company.
 
2021-10-25 3:27:53 PM  

HotWingConspiracy: Another Government Employee: The problem often is job descriptions written too tightly, kicking out applicants that are close.

Amazingly, this has recently sunk in with the HR department where I work. Some of the positions they list as needing a degree and years of experience for I could probably train a smart highschooler to do with two weeks of training.

We've also customized our software to the point that it's impossible to have useful experience with it unless you're already working for the company.


I have started referring to a lot of the issues my team faces as 'x banana problems'.  Referring to how many trained monkeys it would take to solve the problem.

test agent failed?  two banana problem.
Test case failed that's been working for a long time?  One banana problem.
 
2021-10-25 3:33:06 PM  

NephilimNexus: [Fark user image 700x368]


My university is hiring an "entry level" salaried position that requires a degree, experience, full-time but also with nights and weekends with travel.
 
2021-10-25 3:36:53 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: weddingsinger: My best friend just got his CDL because there are a lot of companies hiring.  He applied at at least a dozen companies.

Now, about two weeks later, only three have contacted him.

And one of those three keeps blowing him off as he tries to schedule an interview.

It's almost as if all this talk about a worker shortage is complete horse shiat.


Always has been.

Also, they keep doing this and you keep trying, they know you're more desperate then they are. You're setting yourself up to be low-balled.
 
2021-10-25 3:37:54 PM  
Let's not forget 700,000 dead Americans and for and around 2 million disabled from Long COVID and then however many forced to leave the workforce to take over as caregivers.
 
2021-10-25 3:51:11 PM  

weddingsinger: My best friend just got his CDL because there are a lot of companies hiring.  He applied at at least a dozen companies.

Now, about two weeks later, only three have contacted him.

And one of those three keeps blowing him off as he tries to schedule an interview.


It's the weirdest goddamn thing. Somehow in my department at Kaiser Permanente, they have been unable to find anyone to apply on four years. Somehow.
 
2021-10-25 3:54:46 PM  
So then companies raise pay and benefits, causing them to have to raise their prices, which makes them guilty of screwing customers, right Fark?
 
2021-10-25 3:57:26 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: If only there were some way to train people in becoming skilled workers.  If only.


(._. )
 
2021-10-25 3:57:48 PM  
I applied for a "remote" position managing 4 onsite programs with a total of 32 direct reports responsible for nearly 1000 contingent workers. Want to guess what they finally said the pay rate was? $62k plus potential bonus of up to 10%.

Hahahahaha! I was making 5 times that 3 years ago. Screw you morons.
 
2021-10-25 3:59:48 PM  

weddingsinger: The ultimate example is in fast food.  Are all the McDonald's fully staffed in your area?  But nobody else?

Drive past Burger King's with signs that say 'up to $13/hr' and 2 blocks down is McDonalds and its sign that says 'up to $18/hr'.  Gee, I wonder who they're gonna apply to.


If you're going to weasel-word it with some hypothetical maximum, may as well write "up to $100 per hour".
 
2021-10-25 4:04:55 PM  

jjorsett: So then companies raise pay and benefits, causing them to have to raise their prices, which makes them guilty of screwing customers, right Fark?


Everyone get a load of Stephen Moore over here
 
Juc [TotalFark]
2021-10-25 4:07:10 PM  

majestic: I applied for a "remote" position managing 4 onsite programs with a total of 32 direct reports responsible for nearly 1000 contingent workers. Want to guess what they finally said the pay rate was? $62k plus potential bonus of up to 10%.

Hahahahaha! I was making 5 times that 3 years ago. Screw you morons.


I had an situation like that years ago. they refused to say what the pay would be until they provided an offer letter. I had told them that I'd expect to at least make a certain figure, and they lowballed the hell out of me anyway and acted shocked when I said no.

I don't really get it, do people actually accept those blatantly low offers?
 
2021-10-25 4:11:47 PM  

Juc: majestic: I applied for a "remote" position managing 4 onsite programs with a total of 32 direct reports responsible for nearly 1000 contingent workers. Want to guess what they finally said the pay rate was? $62k plus potential bonus of up to 10%.

Hahahahaha! I was making 5 times that 3 years ago. Screw you morons.

I had an situation like that years ago. they refused to say what the pay would be until they provided an offer letter. I had told them that I'd expect to at least make a certain figure, and they lowballed the hell out of me anyway and acted shocked when I said no.

I don't really get it, do people actually accept those blatantly low offers?


Could it be a case of a company going through the exercise just so they can say, "We couldn't find a legal resident to take this job, so let us bring in a foreigner"?
 
2021-10-25 4:15:51 PM  
In every other market, capitalists preach the laws of supply and demand.

In the labor market? <crickets>
 
2021-10-25 4:17:14 PM  

HotWingConspiracy: Another Government Employee: The problem often is job descriptions written too tightly, kicking out applicants that are close.

Amazingly, this has recently sunk in with the HR department where I work. Some of the positions they list as needing a degree and years of experience for I could probably train a smart highschooler to do with two weeks of training.

We've also customized our software to the point that it's impossible to have useful experience with it unless you're already working for the company.


That's been a long-standing problem: Companies requiring 5 years experience on software that's 2 years old, for example...
 
2021-10-25 4:23:16 PM  

jjorsett: So then companies raise pay and benefits, causing them to have to raise their prices, which makes them guilty of screwing customers, right Fark?


Here's a crazy idea. Maybe those at the top of ladder (CEO, CIO, VPs, board of directors, and other "directors") take a smaller piece of the pie so that the people that are actual making product to ship to customers are more inclined to continue to work for the company and thereby continue to make the company a profit.
 
2021-10-25 4:28:50 PM  
until companies decide that it is fine for managers with little experience to make less than technical people with lots of experience this is going to be a problem.

if you salary cap the technical people they will keep jumping ship or seeking out the management positions and you'll always be short handed.
 
2021-10-25 4:54:46 PM  

weddingsinger: My best friend just got his CDL because there are a lot of companies hiring.  He applied at at least a dozen companies.

Now, about two weeks later, only three have contacted him.

And one of those three keeps blowing him off as he tries to schedule an interview.


Last week I heard a story on the radio about a reporter that was testing the labor shortage and applied for 30 jobs and he specifically applied to places that were crying for help and saying people don't want to work. I think he got a few emails, some calls and 1 interview from the 30.
 
2021-10-25 4:58:37 PM  

Juc: majestic: I applied for a "remote" position managing 4 onsite programs with a total of 32 direct reports responsible for nearly 1000 contingent workers. Want to guess what they finally said the pay rate was? $62k plus potential bonus of up to 10%.

Hahahahaha! I was making 5 times that 3 years ago. Screw you morons.

I had an situation like that years ago. they refused to say what the pay would be until they provided an offer letter. I had told them that I'd expect to at least make a certain figure, and they lowballed the hell out of me anyway and acted shocked when I said no.

I don't really get it, do people actually accept those blatantly low offers?


I sure would. Let me quickly fabricate a resume.
 
2021-10-25 5:25:56 PM  
If you can't afford to pay your workers a living wage, you don't belong in business. The invisible hand will slap you down.
 
2021-10-25 5:29:40 PM  

jjorsett: weddingsinger: The ultimate example is in fast food.  Are all the McDonald's fully staffed in your area?  But nobody else?

Drive past Burger King's with signs that say 'up to $13/hr' and 2 blocks down is McDonalds and its sign that says 'up to $18/hr'.  Gee, I wonder who they're gonna apply to.

If you're going to weasel-word it with some hypothetical maximum, may as well write "up to $100 per hour".


Because it's not "weasel wording". They offer varying pay depending on age and/or experience and availability

15 year olds cant work late, get least.
But an experienced person who wants full time can get the max.
 
2021-10-25 6:19:19 PM  

HotWingConspiracy: Another Government Employee: The problem often is job descriptions written too tightly, kicking out applicants that are close.

Amazingly, this has recently sunk in with the HR department where I work. Some of the positions they list as needing a degree and years of experience for I could probably train a smart highschooler to do with two weeks of training.

We've also customized our software to the point that it's impossible to have useful experience with it unless you're already working for the company.


Just about to finish my business degree and one of the common themes throughout the texts was 'personality over skills.' You can teach typing quicker than teamwork was the lesson.

I've never worked a job where you couldn't take someone fresh out of college and have them up to speed in 90 days. The problem I kept encountering was that management lacked the education they wanted employees to have and thought people were only capable of learning a job by experience. Bit of a disconnect really.
 
2021-10-25 6:21:59 PM  

groppet: weddingsinger: My best friend just got his CDL because there are a lot of companies hiring.  He applied at at least a dozen companies.

Now, about two weeks later, only three have contacted him.

And one of those three keeps blowing him off as he tries to schedule an interview.

Last week I heard a story on the radio about a reporter that was testing the labor shortage and applied for 30 jobs and he specifically applied to places that were crying for help and saying people don't want to work. I think he got a few emails, some calls and 1 interview from the 30.


It was here on fark.

And the one interview wasn't even for the listed position; it was for a different, part-time position, that also paid less per hour
 
2021-10-25 6:47:52 PM  
Here's a fun game: Go to this site and look up wages in your area. Foreign Labor Exchange. They use data from Dept. of Labor, Bureau of Labor Statistics. Damn near every job is listed. The first number is minimum pay for visa workers/ entry level, third is average, fourth is experienced.

https://www.flcdatacenter.com/oeswizardstart.aspx

I print out  a sheet for every job I apply to. Watch them squirm.
 
2021-10-25 10:12:30 PM  

jjorsett: Juc: majestic: I applied for a "remote" position managing 4 onsite programs with a total of 32 direct reports responsible for nearly 1000 contingent workers. Want to guess what they finally said the pay rate was? $62k plus potential bonus of up to 10%.

Hahahahaha! I was making 5 times that 3 years ago. Screw you morons.

I had an situation like that years ago. they refused to say what the pay would be until they provided an offer letter. I had told them that I'd expect to at least make a certain figure, and they lowballed the hell out of me anyway and acted shocked when I said no.

I don't really get it, do people actually accept those blatantly low offers?

Could it be a case of a company going through the exercise just so they can say, "We couldn't find a legal resident to take this job, so let us bring in a foreigner"?


Our department has been playing that game for awhile. If by chance they get someone apply they pull the job, or else put conditions so no one with self respect would take it. The. They cry that they just can't find anyone. But they are trying hard so could everyone just double down and work harder for a little longer?
 
2021-10-25 10:57:18 PM  

weddingsinger: My best friend just got his CDL because there are a lot of companies hiring.  He applied at at least a dozen companies.

Now, about two weeks later, only three have contacted him.

And one of those three keeps blowing him off as he tries to schedule an interview.


Problem is he has a fresh CDL. Most trucking companies want at least a year of CDL experience due to insurance. So it becomes a catch-22, need experience to get the job, but no one will give experience.
 
2021-10-26 2:01:21 AM  
It's actually huge to me that there is a big enough "public consensus" about this. There is a palpable momentum shift, a noticeable power shift from employer to employee, from capital to worker.

It gives me a very faint glimmer of hope.

I hope the workers of this wage slavery empire bring capital to their knees and get the corporate bastards embarrassingly desperate on film.
 
2021-10-26 2:10:31 AM  

NephilimNexus: [Fark user image 700x368]


Is it bad that I interpreted "quit playing" as "this is all a stupid game and you'd honestly be better off not trying to play it at all" and not "quit joking around"?

Because I've seen people just straight-up give up on looking for jobs anymore because they refer to it as "just starving and going broke slower" compared to when they're unemployed.

That's a sign of the times right there.

Most people aren't lazy. They just want to be paid fairly. And what we have now is a system that pays so hideously unfairly that people have begun to completely reject the system outright, because it's literally not much better than no money at all.
 
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