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(Phys Org2)   Astrophysicists reveal the largest-ever suite of universe simulations. But when you think about it, having had *at least* 6 previous attempts they really should be exceedingly efficient at it by now   (phys.org) divider line
    More: Cool, Universe, Gravitation, Dark matter, Physical cosmology, set of cosmological simulations, N-body simulation, General relativity, Astronomy  
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418 clicks; posted to STEM » on 25 Oct 2021 at 12:35 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-10-25 10:09:48 AM  
I thought Kerbal Space Program 2 got delayed?
 
2021-10-25 12:56:35 PM  
miro.medium.comView Full Size
 
2021-10-25 1:17:16 PM  
Yeah, but then you realize you started in the wrong resolution, so you have to shut down the whole universe and change the setting before rebooting.
 
2021-10-25 1:39:38 PM  
i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2021-10-25 1:55:11 PM  
The project has posted some static visualizations, but is it too much to ask to produce a video showing their simulation cosmological evolution over time?
 
2021-10-25 3:03:26 PM  
> AbacusSummit was produced by researchers at the Flatiron Institute's Center for Computational Astrophysics (CCA) in New York City and the Center for Astrophysics | Harvard & Smithsonian.

let's see, Leslie Greengard is the director of the Center for Computational Mathematics at the Flatiron Institute.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flatiro​n​_Institute

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leslie_​G​reengard
2001, Leroy P. Steele Prize for Seminal Contribution to Research from the American Mathematical Society (together with Vladimir Rokhlin), for their paper describing a new algorithm: the fast multipole method (FMM)[1]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fast_mu​l​tipole_method
The fast multipole method (FMM) is a numerical technique that was developed to speed up the calculation of long-ranged forces in the n-body problem. It does this by expanding the system Green's function using a multipole expansion, which allows one to group sources that lie close together and treat them as if they are a single source.[1]

[ there's lots of available GPU software for running this method ]

so basically AbacusSummit is huge computation based on Greengard's method.
 
2021-10-25 3:04:51 PM  
16....16....16....16....16....16....
/Obscure?
 
2021-10-25 3:12:30 PM  

ISO15693: 16....16....16....16....16....16....
/Obscure?


Gah!  I know I've seen that before!  I can't remember where, though... some horror sci-fi... Observation?
 
2021-10-25 3:15:56 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-10-25 3:33:13 PM  

ISO15693: 16....16....16....16....16....16....
/Obscure?


Got me.  I only know 'Number Nine...  Number Nine...  Number Nine...  Number Nine...'

Or is that Kenneth's Frequency?
 
2021-10-25 3:46:56 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: ISO15693: 16....16....16....16....16....16....
/Obscure?

Got me.  I only know 'Number Nine...  Number Nine...  Number Nine...  Number Nine...'

Or is that Kenneth's Frequency?


In the game No Man's Sky, an ancient computer called Atlas runs simulations of universes, even as it seems on the verge of shutting down. That's a little inconvenient as you happen to be inside one of its simulations. The number 16 is important for reasons
 
2021-10-25 4:34:51 PM  

Mega Steve: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: ISO15693: 16....16....16....16....16....16....
/Obscure?

Got me.  I only know 'Number Nine...  Number Nine...  Number Nine...  Number Nine...'

Or is that Kenneth's Frequency?

In the game No Man's Sky, an ancient computer called Atlas runs simulations of universes, even as it seems on the verge of shutting down. That's a little inconvenient as you happen to be inside one of its simulations. The number 16 is important for reasons


Ah.  Thanks for the info!

Have you read any Walter Jon Williams?  You might be interested in his novel, "Implied Spaces".

'Setting:  Implied Spaces takes place approximately 1,500 to 2,000 years in the future. Humanity has entered a period of technological singularity fueled by a series of massive supercomputers orbiting the sun (Dyson Sphere). These computers act as giant solar collectors and computational machine for running human society. While humanity numbers in the hundreds of billions, only perhaps a few million live in the solar system. Some have gone on slower than light journeys to establish colonies around other stars, such as Alpha Centauri, Tau Ceti, and Epsilon Eridani, a colony lost after a stellar event known as "The Big Belch".

Most humans live in artificially created pocket universes. These universes are connected to our own via wormholes maintained on the dark side of the eleven supercomputers orbiting the sun. These artificial universes can be designed to cater to individual populaces and some have different physical laws than our universe. These pocket universes include the technologically advanced world of Topaz, the medieval fantasy themed world of Midgarth, the hunter gatherer world Olduvia, and the aquatic paradise of Hawaiki, among many others.

Various advancements in biotechnology have effectively rendered mankind immortal. Humans no longer age normally, and even death has been overcome by means of resurrection facilities which will download a backed up copy of a personality and memories into a reformed body. Genetic manipulation has allowed people to obtain designer bodies with different, even nonhuman, features.

The sole dark spot seems to be the long dormant fear of an episode from the distant past: the Control Alt Delete War. In this first truly worldwide war, a revolutionary political faction known as the Seraphim used a bio-engineered virus to attack humanity. Rather than killing its victims, this virus rewrote their brains so that they were loyal to the Seraphim. As other groups discovered this new weapon they re-engineered it for their own purposes, including one version of the virus which created "zombies", people with an uncontrollable violent rage toward others. While this technology was ultimately suppressed and all but the oldest humans seem to have put it behind them, it remains as a black spot on an otherwise perfect society.'
 
2021-10-25 6:41:19 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Mega Steve: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: ISO15693: 16....16....16....16....16....16....
/Obscure?

Got me.  I only know 'Number Nine...  Number Nine...  Number Nine...  Number Nine...'

Or is that Kenneth's Frequency?

In the game No Man's Sky, an ancient computer called Atlas runs simulations of universes, even as it seems on the verge of shutting down. That's a little inconvenient as you happen to be inside one of its simulations. The number 16 is important for reasons

Ah.  Thanks for the info!

Have you read any Walter Jon Williams?  You might be interested in his novel, "Implied Spaces".

'Setting:  Implied Spaces takes place approximately 1,500 to 2,000 years in the future. Humanity has entered a period of technological singularity fueled by a series of massive supercomputers orbiting the sun (Dyson Sphere). These computers act as giant solar collectors and computational machine for running human society. While humanity numbers in the hundreds of billions, only perhaps a few million live in the solar system. Some have gone on slower than light journeys to establish colonies around other stars, such as Alpha Centauri, Tau Ceti, and Epsilon Eridani, a colony lost after a stellar event known as "The Big Belch".

Most humans live in artificially created pocket universes. These universes are connected to our own via wormholes maintained on the dark side of the eleven supercomputers orbiting the sun. These artificial universes can be designed to cater to individual populaces and some have different physical laws than our universe. These pocket universes include the technologically advanced world of Topaz, the medieval fantasy themed world of Midgarth, the hunter gatherer world Olduvia, and the aquatic paradise of Hawaiki, among many others.

Various advancements in biotechnology have effectively rendered mankind immortal. Humans no longer age normally, and even death has been overcome by means of resurrection facilities which will download a backed up copy of a personality ...


Thanks! I'll check it ou
 
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