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(Popular Science)   We have seen the future ... and it's pretty grim   (popsci.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Star, Planet, White dwarfs, Sun, team of astronomers, remains of a dead star, White dwarf, Jupiter mass planet  
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1854 clicks; posted to STEM » on 24 Oct 2021 at 12:12 PM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-10-24 1:03:50 PM  
4 votes:
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2021-10-24 1:11:42 PM  
3 votes:
If that was anything close to the biggest threat to humanity then we'd be doing quite well.
 
2021-10-24 12:27:52 PM  
2 votes:
"I'll take Science facts I've known since 1983 for five hundred, Alex."
 
2021-10-24 12:49:24 PM  
2 votes:

Chief Superintendent Lookout: "I'll take Science facts I've known since 1983 for five hundred, Alex."


This. It is pretty cool they've detected a system fairly similar to ours after the red giant phase with a surviving jovian outer planet, but we've long known how the end would come- and roughly when.
 
2021-10-24 12:59:44 PM  
2 votes:

Wenchmaster: we've long known theorized how the end would come- and roughly when.


Sure, it's been a widely accepted theory, but it is nice to have some more solid evidence to support the theory.

Science is fun.
 
2021-10-24 2:27:52 PM  
2 votes:
Wait till the end of the Stelliferous era, it gets grim and DARK. Sol will be a forgotten cinder somewhere by then, of course, and humans long gone well before that. Cheers!
 
2021-10-24 2:32:18 PM  
2 votes:

SuperSeriousMan: Wenchmaster: we've long known theorized how the end would come- and roughly when.

Sure, it's been a widely accepted theory, but it is nice to have some more solid evidence to support the theory.

Science is fun.


Science is awesome. In this particular case, TFA provides evidence supporting the theory some of the outer planets of a Sol-type system might survive the red giant phase of the star's life. This is a very cool discovery, validating current theories with observation. It doesn't add any evidence about the fate of any inner planets.

Current theory suggests most planets engulfed by the expanding star will quickly (for a relative value of "quickly") get torn apart by the gravity and heat inside the star. Aside from the lack of any mention of other planets in the system described in TFA, the fate (or existence) of any inner planets is not mentioned.

It might be possible for a jovian planet engulfed by its parent star to survive, but there's no evidence (yet). The planet described in TFA is roughly the same distance from its star as Jupiter is from Sol, so it is unlikely to have been engulfed- assuming the interpretation of the remnant star's mass are accurate. It's possible the surviving planet was initially much closer to the parent star, and is gradually drifting outward due to the star's loss of mass. It will be neat to see what Hubble and Webb can give us.
 
2021-10-24 2:41:11 PM  
2 votes:

falkone32: If that was anything close to the biggest threat to humanity then we'd be doing quite well.


Yep. After another ~8 billion years, there wouldn't be any humans left on Earth (or anywhere else) anyway. A couple of trillion years after that, the long-burning red dwarfs will start to sputter out, and the entire universe will start getting very dark and cold. A few trillion more years ought to see the universe finally lose its last few warm spots, and have a more-or-less uniform temperature. It will be a really large, cold place with nothing but the cosmic background radiation for light.

And we won't be around to see it, which means Milliways is gonna lose out on some revenue.
 
2021-10-24 5:03:27 PM  
2 votes:
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2021-10-24 1:23:43 PM  
1 vote:
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2021-10-24 2:27:16 PM  
1 vote:
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