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(CNN)   The "Gunshine State" is getting rid of palm trees. Meth, Covid, and Carole Baskin are still ok   (cnn.com) divider line
    More: Florida, Carbon dioxide, palm trees, climate change, West Palm Beach, Miami Beach, atmospheric carbon dioxide, pounds of CO2, native canopy trees  
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3659 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Oct 2021 at 4:05 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



50 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-10-24 4:16:27 AM  
Good luck with that. Palms are there because they don't blow down as easily in hurricanes and don't need the nutrients the "soil" doesn't have; but go ahead and try planting trees that dont belong there.
 
2021-10-24 4:17:06 AM  
Does the alternative to palm use less water? Are they able to deal with 5 hurricanes a year?
 
2021-10-24 4:19:54 AM  
What did the hurricane say to the palm tree?

Hold onto your nuts this is no ordinary blow job.
 
2021-10-24 4:22:54 AM  
I thought it was fossil fuels but it was palm trees causing climate change? Now I have to murder my banana tree out of principle!
 
2021-10-24 4:23:58 AM  
I'd like to state I'm not a Floridian and I can kill my banana tree because unlike a Floridian, I am not dying from Covid-19 yet.
 
2021-10-24 4:24:45 AM  
Two possibilities, either the new trees are better adapted to the environment in which case, congratulations to the new invasive species.

Or... they are worse, in which case they only survive with lots of human intervention, which means they"re a loser in the greenhouse gas column.
 
2021-10-24 4:31:20 AM  
  Could it be coconuts kill 150 people each year worldwide?
 
2021-10-24 4:41:21 AM  
The entire state is an invasive species, what do?
Noticeable lack of anything like, How about you farkers just quit using so much?    BUT THE SPONSORS
 
2021-10-24 4:42:21 AM  

Gyrfalcon: Good luck with that. Palms are there because they don't blow down as easily in hurricanes and don't need the nutrients the "soil" doesn't have; but go ahead and try planting trees that dont belong there.


Live oaks are very common and native to Florida. They do very well without help, even on barrier islands.
 
2021-10-24 4:43:39 AM  
Looking at the thread... none of you seem to know anything about Florida beyond what you see on TV.
 
2021-10-24 4:43:46 AM  
Oh Florida, just sink to the bottom of the ocean and do all of us a favor
 
2021-10-24 4:45:07 AM  
Does Ron DeSantis know?

Pretty sure, given his track record, he will award tree contracts to theme parks and they will install cost effective plastic trees.
 
2021-10-24 4:57:24 AM  

adamatari: Gyrfalcon: Good luck with that. Palms are there because they don't blow down as easily in hurricanes and don't need the nutrients the "soil" doesn't have; but go ahead and try planting trees that dont belong there.

Live oaks are very common and native to Florida. They do very well without help, even on barrier islands.


In some places, true. So do pines.

I am just scoffing at the idea they're going to plant large forests of maples and chestnuts in the sandy scruff optimistically called "soil" in most of Florida, and have any impact on climate change this late in the day.

They just suddenly realized Miami is going to be knee deep in water sooner rather than later, and think this will fix it somehow.
 
2021-10-24 4:59:19 AM  

adamatari: Looking at the thread... none of you seem to know anything about Florida beyond what you see on TV.


I know plenty, dear.

Swamp palms and sawgrass are native to Florida. "Palm trees" can mean almost anything with fronds.
 
2021-10-24 5:00:07 AM  
Even though palms may not be great at carbon sequestration, chopping them down isn't the answer. Instead, programs in both West Palm Beach and Miami Beach, Florida, are taking the initiative to plant trees more adept at handling changing climate conditions.


Headline : DERP
Farkers: DERP DERP DEPR
 
2021-10-24 5:26:33 AM  

adamatari: Gyrfalcon: Good luck with that. Palms are there because they don't blow down as easily in hurricanes and don't need the nutrients the "soil" doesn't have; but go ahead and try planting trees that dont belong there.

Live oaks are very common and native to Florida. They do very well without help, even on barrier islands.


There's even a town called Live Oak.  They subsist on music festivals, arrests, manufactured housing.
 
2021-10-24 5:40:48 AM  
They could significantly decrease the swamp gas greenhouse effect by denying the orange one from returning. After all, New Jersey IS the 'garden state' and could maybe offset his swamp gas easier.
 
2021-10-24 6:17:10 AM  

Gyrfalcon: Good luck with that. Palms are there because they don't blow down as easily in hurricanes and don't need the nutrients the "soil" doesn't have; but go ahead and try planting trees that dont belong there.


Replying to an article explaining that they are planting trees native to Florida.

Well done.
 
2021-10-24 6:20:53 AM  

liquidsiphon: I thought it was fossil fuels but it was palm trees causing climate change? Now I have to murder my banana tree out of principle!


That's only if you are unable to comprehend that there can be more than one cause to climate change.

Can you?

Palm trees are a part, because wood stores CO2. In particular palm tree oil is a huge problem, because forests are cut down, in order to produce palm tree oil.
 
2021-10-24 6:22:42 AM  

EvilEgg: Two possibilities, either the new trees are better adapted to the environment in which case, congratulations to the new invasive species.

Or... they are worse, in which case they only survive with lots of human intervention, which means they"re a loser in the greenhouse gas column.


Third, they're native trees from Florida, that are better at it and not invasive.

If you read TFA, sorry.
 
2021-10-24 6:23:13 AM  
Man Groves is what I call the hairy bits around my naughty parts, but maybe Florida needs something like that - or more of it.
 
2021-10-24 6:26:45 AM  

Ketchuponsteak: EvilEgg: Two possibilities, either the new trees are better adapted to the environment in which case, congratulations to the new invasive species.

Or... they are worse, in which case they only survive with lots of human intervention, which means they"re a loser in the greenhouse gas column.

Third, they're native trees from Florida, that are better at it and not invasive.

If you read TFA, sorry.


Rtfa? You must be new here.
 
2021-10-24 6:27:51 AM  
Somebody needs to tell their State DOT. They have been planting palms at highway interchanges all over the place. They planted palms near their new "Welcome to Florida" signs at the state line on I-75 and I-95.(and probably I-10).
 
2021-10-24 6:33:20 AM  
Boy can CNN blow a story out of all proportion!

The "Sustainably Director" of ONE city (West Palm Beach) is using her "Canopy Growth Fund" to buy other types of native trees that palms.

That is not "Florida Ditching Palm Trees!"

But no one reads the story just the headline, so now I expect Gov. DeathSentence next week to ban "the ban on palm trees".
 
2021-10-24 6:34:59 AM  
a standard passenger vehicle emits about 10,000 pounds (4.6 metric tons) of CO2 per year,

I'm having trouble with the math. The numbers I usually hear are that your average car is driven 12,000 miles per year. So if your car gets 20 mpg, which is probably conservative, then the vehicle uses 600 gallons of gasoline each year. The fuel weighs 6.3 pounds per gallon so the total weight of the fuel burned is 3,780 pounds.

How can you get 10,000 pounds of anything out of 3,780 pounds?
 
2021-10-24 6:42:18 AM  
Reporting from Tall Oaks, Florida. It seems that people move here because, oh look, pretty palm trees and magnificent oaks. Then they move in and it's all cut them down! The oaks leave a lot a debris on the ground and the palm trees may fall during a storm and crush your house.
 
2021-10-24 7:02:03 AM  

Gyrfalcon: Good luck with that. Palms are there because they don't blow down as easily in hurricanes and don't need the nutrients the "soil" doesn't have; but go ahead and try planting trees that dont belong there.


1. Palms do blow over very easily hurricanes but they survive. Think of all the palm trees you've seen that start horizontally and the bend upward. Those are the ones that fell over.

2. They are not native to most of Florida, maybe the Keys. But the ones from Palm Beach, north were all planted there.

But please, continue...
 
2021-10-24 7:45:19 AM  
"The Gunshine State"

Reminds me of the "Miami, see it like a native" ad campaign, and its inevitable parodies

Fark user imageView Full Size
...
 
2021-10-24 8:13:38 AM  

Cajnik: Does the alternative to palm use less water? Are they able to deal with 5 hurricanes a year?


Mangroves do pretty well at keeping botg Hurricanes and Humans out
 
2021-10-24 8:15:15 AM  

Gyrfalcon: adamatari: Gyrfalcon: Good luck with that. Palms are there because they don't blow down as easily in hurricanes and don't need the nutrients the "soil" doesn't have; but go ahead and try planting trees that dont belong there.

Live oaks are very common and native to Florida. They do very well without help, even on barrier islands.

In some places, true. So do pines.

I am just scoffing at the idea they're going to plant large forests of maples and chestnuts in the sandy scruff optimistically called "soil" in most of Florida, and have any impact on climate change this late in the day.

They just suddenly realized Miami is going to be knee deep in water sooner rather than later, and think this will fix it somehow.


Mangroves are native and would do gunfine
 
2021-10-24 8:21:02 AM  
When I lived in Florida, many moons ago, we had a paper bark tree in our front yard. The wiki says it is invasive, but it didn't seem so bad. It was climb-able and provided good shade. The bark was all kinds of cool to a young kid. It was a couple hundred yards from the ocean so the species acclimated well toife in Florida.
 
2021-10-24 8:37:39 AM  

Interceptor1: a standard passenger vehicle emits about 10,000 pounds (4.6 metric tons) of CO2 per year,

I'm having trouble with the math. The numbers I usually hear are that your average car is driven 12,000 miles per year. So if your car gets 20 mpg, which is probably conservative, then the vehicle uses 600 gallons of gasoline each year. The fuel weighs 6.3 pounds per gallon so the total weight of the fuel burned is 3,780 pounds.

How can you get 10,000 pounds of anything out of 3,780 pounds?


Remember 1st grade science?  When you cover the jar that the lit candle is in, it stops burning.  When you burn gas, it uses the carbon from the petrol chains, and oxygen from the atmosphere.  CO2 has a lot more mass from oxygen than carbon (32/44 = 73%).
 
2021-10-24 8:45:33 AM  
America's cat boxTM is already farked, no matter what they start planting now.
 
2021-10-24 8:58:48 AM  

Interceptor1: a standard passenger vehicle emits about 10,000 pounds (4.6 metric tons) of CO2 per year,

I'm having trouble with the math. The numbers I usually hear are that your average car is driven 12,000 miles per year. So if your car gets 20 mpg, which is probably conservative, then the vehicle uses 600 gallons of gasoline each year. The fuel weighs 6.3 pounds per gallon so the total weight of the fuel burned is 3,780 pounds.

How can you get 10,000 pounds of anything out of 3,780 pounds?


It's like the resources supposedly cattle use.  The numbers are entirely made up and have no basis in reality.  For most cases I've seen of people with political leanings towards one side science and facts are tossed out the window when it comes to advocating their cause.
 
2021-10-24 9:24:35 AM  
And each one uses as much water in a day as five men. Really just a ridiculous show of wealth and power, if you ask me
 
2021-10-24 9:26:58 AM  

nobody11155: Interceptor1: a standard passenger vehicle emits about 10,000 pounds (4.6 metric tons) of CO2 per year,

I'm having trouble with the math. The numbers I usually hear are that your average car is driven 12,000 miles per year. So if your car gets 20 mpg, which is probably conservative, then the vehicle uses 600 gallons of gasoline each year. The fuel weighs 6.3 pounds per gallon so the total weight of the fuel burned is 3,780 pounds.

How can you get 10,000 pounds of anything out of 3,780 pounds?

It's like the resources supposedly cattle use.  The numbers are entirely made up and have no basis in reality.  For most cases I've seen of people with political leanings towards one side science and facts are tossed out the window when it comes to advocating their cause.


Or it was explained 2 posts above yours. How embarrassing, going through life constantly thinking you're smarter than all the scientists who actually know stuff.
 
2021-10-24 9:41:02 AM  

poorjon: And each one uses as much water in a day as five men. Really just a ridiculous show of wealth and power, if you ask me


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-10-24 9:53:35 AM  

algman: Interceptor1: a standard passenger vehicle emits about 10,000 pounds (4.6 metric tons) of CO2 per year,

I'm having trouble with the math. The numbers I usually hear are that your average car is driven 12,000 miles per year. So if your car gets 20 mpg, which is probably conservative, then the vehicle uses 600 gallons of gasoline each year. The fuel weighs 6.3 pounds per gallon so the total weight of the fuel burned is 3,780 pounds.

How can you get 10,000 pounds of anything out of 3,780 pounds?

Remember 1st grade science?  When you cover the jar that the lit candle is in, it stops burning.  When you burn gas, it uses the carbon from the petrol chains, and oxygen from the atmosphere.  CO2 has a lot more mass from oxygen than carbon (32/44 = 73%).


While the candle thing is elementary school (3rd grade or so iirc),

the addition of atmospheric oxygen molecules to carbon during combustion is at least high school chemistry.

/don't insult your audience too much :)
 
2021-10-24 9:56:21 AM  

Gyrfalcon: adamatari: Gyrfalcon: Good luck with that. Palms are there because they don't blow down as easily in hurricanes and don't need the nutrients the "soil" doesn't have; but go ahead and try planting trees that dont belong there.

Live oaks are very common and native to Florida. They do very well without help, even on barrier islands.

In some places, true. So do pines.

I am just scoffing at the idea they're going to plant large forests of maples and chestnuts in the sandy scruff optimistically called "soil" in most of Florida, and have any impact on climate change this late in the day.

They just suddenly realized Miami is going to be knee deep in water sooner rather than later, and think this will fix it somehow.


They say native trees in the article.
 
2021-10-24 9:58:56 AM  

Gyrfalcon: Good luck with that. Palms are there because they don't blow down as easily in hurricanes and don't need the nutrients the "soil" doesn't have; but go ahead and try planting trees that dont belong there.


Florida is already full of transplants that don't belong there.
 
2021-10-24 10:09:52 AM  

EvilEgg: Ketchuponsteak: EvilEgg: Two possibilities, either the new trees are better adapted to the environment in which case, congratulations to the new invasive species.

Or... they are worse, in which case they only survive with lots of human intervention, which means they"re a loser in the greenhouse gas column.

Third, they're native trees from Florida, that are better at it and not invasive.

If you read TFA, sorry.

Rtfa? You must be new here.


I didn't think you did, I just said sorry to be safe. Because if you had read it, then I kinda insulted your intelligence.
 
2021-10-24 12:16:03 PM  

Gyrfalcon: Good luck with that. Palms are there because they don't blow down as easily in hurricanes and don't need the nutrients the "soil" doesn't have; but go ahead and try planting trees that dont belong there.


Um no. Palm trees have been planted there. The canopy trees they are talking about are original to that area. But congratulations on getting it so very wrong and getting so many people to smart and funny you.
 
2021-10-24 1:03:47 PM  

cew-smoke: Gyrfalcon: Good luck with that. Palms are there because they don't blow down as easily in hurricanes and don't need the nutrients the "soil" doesn't have; but go ahead and try planting trees that dont belong there.

Um no. Palm trees have been planted there. The canopy trees they are talking about are original to that area. But congratulations on getting it so very wrong and getting so many people to smart and funny you.


and since i went through hurricane charlie...(port charlotte)
my oak tree fell and would have killed my neighbor when it went through his house, but he had evacuated.
the palms were still standing tall like sentinels,
back to you.
 
2021-10-24 2:04:13 PM  
Swamps and wetlands are way better carbon sinks than trees. Knock down the levies and let those lawns turn back into the ooze.  Its only a matter of time before rebuilding after hurricanes is no longer economical possible.  Insurance companies will either refuse to pay out claims or refuse to insure you.  Lets say as climate change continues there is a 100% chance of Miami getting hit with a hurricane once every 10 years.  The median price of a home there is $515,000. The insurance company would have to charge at least $51,000 a year to break even.  That $1800 a month mortgage is now $6900 a month. Change it to only 50% chance every 10 years and the mortgage is still over $4500 a month.

Same thing is going to happen in Louisiana for the same reason and much sooner. In the last 16 months, climate change has resulted in 5 hurricanes and two other named tropical storms hitting the state. The entire state budgets  of Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Tennessee is less than what the federal government spent to rebuild homes and businesses after Katrina.  Its cheaper to move entire towns inland than rebuild them every year.  The state is already considering relocating the entire populations of Lafitte and Grand Island that were were destroyed again by Ida in August.
 
2021-10-24 2:53:50 PM  
They should plant sequoias and redwoods. Those are nice trees.

And none of this matters anyway because the state is going to be underwater before ANY trees they are planting today get to mature. So it doesn't matter what they plant.

I say, live your dream Florida!
 
2021-10-24 4:23:46 PM  

Captain Shaky: They should plant sequoias and redwoods. Those are nice trees.

And none of this matters anyway because the state is going to be underwater before ANY trees they are planting today get to mature. So it doesn't matter what they plant.

I say, live your dream Florida!


You're about as high as a Sequoia if you think they're capable of surviving South FL tropical heat & native plus invasive insects.

Planting more Live Oak and other native trees is never a bad idea here ever. They're already salt resistant, drought tolerant after a certain age, and absolutely do as much to beautify as well as cool the areas that their gorgeous canopies cover. I live in St. Augustine but have lived and worked all over Florida over the years and anywhere the shade is, is tolerable. They most definitely are hurricane resistant if well kept, absolutely reduce the temperature of shaded neighborhoods by @ 5° F compared to 'hoods that mostly consist of blacktop and strip malls, and also provide protective cover for a variety of small wildlife and songbirds, something also already on the decline in America and the rest of the world.

We could probably stand to have more rare tropicals planted here like Teak, Mahogany, Lignum-Vitae, et cetera, and maybe some of those South Am rainforest trees along with their nut trees and guaraña vines. There are plenty of places left in South Florida where the soil could be raised up with caliche, clay, and sand as well as "real" soil to start building Florida back up above the future surf line, so maybe it's high time we stopped letting the Ay-rabs and Colombians launder their dirty money into sinking condos and start forcing them to buy into rebuilding the coasts and creating a taller Florida surrounded by mangroves and cash crop hardwood tree plantations.
 
2021-10-24 4:47:16 PM  
Mahogany sounds good. I like Mahogany.
 
2021-10-24 5:24:34 PM  
cdn.cnn.comView Full Size



That's not planting tress, that's moving them.  I'm sure there were no emissions from that truck though
 
2021-10-25 6:31:58 AM  

brainlordmesomorph: CO2 has a lot more mass from oxygen than carbon (32/44 = 73%).


And to clarify where these numbers came from for the non-chemistry folks:

Atomic weight of carbon: 12
Atomic weight of oxygen: 32 (oxygen's atomic weight is 16, and there are two oxygen atoms in CO2)
Total atomic weight of CO2: 44

Carbon portion of CO2 by weight: 12/44 = 27.3%
Oxygen portion of CO2 by weight: 32/44 = 72.7%
 
2021-10-25 11:50:04 AM  

WTP 2: cew-smoke: Gyrfalcon: Good luck with that. Palms are there because they don't blow down as easily in hurricanes and don't need the nutrients the "soil" doesn't have; but go ahead and try planting trees that dont belong there.

Um no. Palm trees have been planted there. The canopy trees they are talking about are original to that area. But congratulations on getting it so very wrong and getting so many people to smart and funny you.

and since i went through hurricane charlie...(port charlotte)
my oak tree fell and would have killed my neighbor when it went through his house, but he had evacuated.
the palms were still standing tall like sentinels,
back to you.


No problem. I lived in Florida probably longer than you've been alive. Oak trees aren't what provide canopy. Go look at pictures of tropical and sub-tropical areas and see what canopy trees look like and then we'll talk.
 
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