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(CNBC)   Pay workers a living wage? Hahahaha. Jerry, get the robots going   (cnbc.com) divider line
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2625 clicks; posted to STEM » and Business » on 23 Oct 2021 at 8:15 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-10-23 8:18:37 AM  
The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.
 
2021-10-23 8:21:34 AM  

discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.


The robot can run 24/7 and doesn't require benefits.

Robots are eventually going to take over a ton more jobs over time.  The whole paradigm of everybody needing to be employed to survive is going to have to change at some point.
 
2021-10-23 8:25:59 AM  

discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.


It would be more effective to buy killbots to seek out, abduct, and oversee slave labor.

i.ytimg.comView Full Size

= ORDER SUBMITTED FOR TWO CHIKN SANDWICHES, TWO WAFFLE FRIES, ONE LEMONADE, ONE SWEET TEA. YOU HAVE SIXTY SECONDS TO COMPLY =
 
2021-10-23 8:26:29 AM  

discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.


The health insurance costs alone in my office total over $3,000/month. Plus, there's payroll taxes, Workman's Comp, unemployment, uniforms, etc
I'm not saying I'm switching to robots. In my line of work, my employees can't (yet) be replaced with robots. But, if you're looking to cut labor costs, leasing robots for $3,000/month is a pretty good start.
Employers will always find ways to cut costs.
 
2021-10-23 8:28:03 AM  

discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.


A living wage in 2021 would be between $25 per hour and $30 per hour. $15 per hour was the goal a decade ago, and too many people are stuck using 1990's numbers for income when things clearly cost way more now.

Better yet, make it $35 per hour and a 4-day work week, so people actually get to LIVE instead of wasting their one chance at life on this planet slaving away behind a desk and only able to make dinner when they get home before they have to go to sleep and do it all again.
 
2021-10-23 8:33:27 AM  

NeoCortex42: discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.

The robot can run 24/7 and doesn't require benefits.

Robots are eventually going to take over a ton more jobs over time.  The whole paradigm of everybody needing to be employed to survive is going to have to change at some point.


Uh huh.  You just keep believing that myth.

FTC reportedly investigating McDonald's broken McFlurry machines

They Hacked McDonald's Ice Cream Machines-and Started a Cold War | WIRED

This won't be any different than the time businesses were expanding self-checkout lanes and have been reducing them in favor or staffed cashier lanes.  I love self-checkout lanes, but they weren't the boon to businesses and reduced labor as the concept was presented.
 
2021-10-23 8:33:49 AM  
The end goal of every business process is automation.  If a website or machine can replace an employee, employers will do it the second it becomes cost effective and the customers allow it.

Or in Walmarts case, sooner than that.
 
2021-10-23 8:33:55 AM  
You want some more?
Youtube Dlc7Aht_09I
 
2021-10-23 8:38:08 AM  
Good. We do not have enough workers to go around especially if we are going to make more stuff here. I remember reading an article about manufacturing in Vietnam. The writer suggested to a guy coordinating deals there that Vietnam might be a replacement for China as a supplier for the US market and he laughed because China has a billion people and there was no way that any country could replace China as our supplier.

Certainly even making a little headway would mean automating the shiat out of everything else to free up enough people to work in assembly plants. There are a lot of jobs you can't really automate. Uncertainty will make more companies look at building new factories where they can find workers.
 
2021-10-23 8:39:39 AM  
I don't think we ever should have allowed the abuses we all know happen in the service industry, never mind allowing them to become so standard that we no longer even think about it.

However, replacing service staff with robots isn't part of the abuse - it's just society evolving as technology develops.  If the robots are less expensive, you HAVE to use them or your business will go under as a new company pops up that does use them and kills you with its lower margins.

That of course assumes the robots are ready and a net savings.  I'm not sure they are yet, or McD's would have already automated their kitchens.  And until you have AI that can fool you into feeling like you're having a real social interaction, I don't think the kind of restaurant that has waiters will be replacing waiters any time soon.
 
2021-10-23 8:41:20 AM  

Chief Superintendent Lookout: NeoCortex42: discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.

The robot can run 24/7 and doesn't require benefits.

Robots are eventually going to take over a ton more jobs over time.  The whole paradigm of everybody needing to be employed to survive is going to have to change at some point.

Uh huh.  You just keep believing that myth.

FTC reportedly investigating McDonald's broken McFlurry machines

They Hacked McDonald's Ice Cream Machines-and Started a Cold War | WIRED

This won't be any different than the time businesses were expanding self-checkout lanes and have been reducing them in favor or staffed cashier lanes.  I love self-checkout lanes, but they weren't the boon to businesses and reduced labor as the concept was presented.


I'm not saying that every job will be automated, but when you can go from a six-man crew to a two-man crew plus robots, you're still stuck with no job for four people there.
 
2021-10-23 8:41:59 AM  
I can't wait for automated servers. You think customers are sh*tty to human waitstaff, just wait until a robot brings them the wrong order.
 
2021-10-23 8:43:17 AM  

NeoCortex42: discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.

The robot can run 24/7 and doesn't require benefits.



They don't call in sick.
Can get by with a minimum of amenities like heating/AC/lighting.
They don't need lunch breaks, although they tend to take a break when something goes wrong.
No carpal tunnel for repetitive tasks.
Still need humans for repair and setup. So far.
Best of all, they don't try to form unions. Yet.
 
2021-10-23 8:44:35 AM  

NeoCortex42: discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.

The robot can run 24/7 and doesn't require benefits.

Robots are eventually going to take over a ton more jobs over time.  The whole paradigm of everybody needing to be employed to survive is going to have to change at some point.


HAHAHAHHAHAHAHHA god you are farking stupid if you think anything can run 24/7 without any downtime. If it breaks guess what, you just lost your ONLY source of production for whatever its doing. Given that its not a normal item, its going to require specialized repair services, which would possibly take it offline for weeks, if not months, depending on what broke.

Then you have to remember that the robot can ONLY do what it was programmed AND equipped to do. While basically anyone on BOH staff in any food business is fully cross trained in all of the basics, this things is not. It means that it is utterly useless during downtime when its not needed because it just takes up space and power, not switching over to a different task until things start to pick up again


Robots are good for things like brewing coffee. Not for anything in an actual kitchen
 
2021-10-23 8:47:54 AM  
What's going to happen is this:

You order food with a punch button or voice activated menu.

You receive the food yourself when your number is called or some other such service.

How it gets cooked, how it's raw form gets to the business, that's for the ownership to figure out. On the inside it won't be more robots, just less employees, which will put the onus on the customer to pick up the slack.
 
2021-10-23 8:48:03 AM  

discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.


Most McDonalds are already automated as much as possible.  You still need one person to operate the cash register and physically hand stuff in the drive through and watch the restaurant.
It's a similar story elsewhere.  Bleeding edge robotics are unreliable, absurdly expensive, and serious safety hazards.
This is a threat from the wealthy to deter unions and individual merit based pay raises at review time (note, Amazon has already converted to AI management for most of their employees).  There isn't any low hanging fruit, subby.
 
2021-10-23 8:52:38 AM  

Chief Superintendent Lookout: This won't be any different than the time businesses were expanding self-checkout lanes and have been reducing them in favor or staffed cashier lanes. I love self-checkout lanes, but they weren't the boon to businesses and reduced labor as the concept was presented.


I've actually monitored self-checkout lanes.  Every six lanes requires a cashier to help people, but that is also the number of lanes required to replace one cashier with experience; so break-even at best*.  I'll use self-checkout if I have fewer than five items and they all have barcodes.

If the self-checkout is set too loud or badly programmed, I won't use it again at that store.

*One store I frequent, they use cashiers that have problems lifting heavy items, so that's a plus.
 
2021-10-23 8:53:26 AM  

Northern: discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.

Most McDonalds are already automated as much as possible.  You still need one person to operate the cash register and physically hand stuff in the drive through and watch the restaurant.
It's a similar story elsewhere.  Bleeding edge robotics are unreliable, absurdly expensive, and serious safety hazards.
This is a threat from the wealthy to deter unions and individual merit based pay raises at review time (note, Amazon has already converted to AI management for most of their employees).  There isn't any low hanging fruit, subby.


Won't need the cashier when hard currency is banned, which I expect to happen in my lifetime. It will start small, rewarded for only using plastic or an app, and eventually they will convince Congress to repeal whatever forces them to take hard currency now. Hard currency is actually a huge PITA for businesses, credit cards were a farking miracle.
 
2021-10-23 8:54:43 AM  

A General Disdain For All Of Humanity: make it $35 per hour and a 4-day work week, so people actually get to LIVE instead of wasting their one chance at life on this planet slaving away behind a desk and only able to make dinner when they get home before they have to go to sleep and do it all again.


The problem with "the economy will make new jobs as robots take over the old ones" is that there's only so much trading of arts and crafts on Esty that people will do with each other.

What new jobs do you think might appear?  Even the arts are in danger of sloughing off most of their workers as computers will be able to replace everyone except in live performances coontil we have good enough robots for that too).

The basic needs of Maslow's Pyramid drive the economy.  If a robot digs ore out of the ground and refines it while another robot tends crops, a third raises livestock (if we don't just lab-grow the flesh), and a fourth delivers the final products to you... there's not a lot of need for humans in the economy.

We'll still argue over access to resources so there will still be rich and poor, but if you think the concentration of wealth is insane today just wait until the rich don't need the poor anymore and cut them out of the economy entirely... and live in territory that is safe and secured by robot soldiers while the poor are kept controlled by robot cops.  You know, until they finish starving because they aren't allowed to use the good farm land or drink the good water because some rich guy wants it for his 10th vacation property.
 
2021-10-23 8:54:48 AM  

discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.


Not really, that works out to be about 45 hours a week at $15 an hour (assuming 4.3 weeks in a month, or 50 hours for a 4 week month). A robot can easily work 100+ hours a week.
 
2021-10-23 8:58:34 AM  

MindStalker: discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.

Not really, that works out to be about 45 hours a week at $15 an hour (assuming 4.3 weeks in a month, or 50 hours for a 4 week month). A robot can easily work 100+ hours a week.


And the robot can sit idle without costing you extra, so if you can get your need for humans on site down to one to supervise... now you can keep your restaurant open 24/7 and you don't need more than a couple of customers in the slow periods to make that worth it.
 
2021-10-23 8:59:08 AM  

Bathtub Cynic: Northern: discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.

Most McDonalds are already automated as much as possible.  You still need one person to operate the cash register and physically hand stuff in the drive through and watch the restaurant.
It's a similar story elsewhere.  Bleeding edge robotics are unreliable, absurdly expensive, and serious safety hazards.
This is a threat from the wealthy to deter unions and individual merit based pay raises at review time (note, Amazon has already converted to AI management for most of their employees).  There isn't any low hanging fruit, subby.

Won't need the cashier when hard currency is banned, which I expect to happen in my lifetime. It will start small, rewarded for only using plastic or an app, and eventually they will convince Congress to repeal whatever forces them to take hard currency now. Hard currency is actually a huge PITA for businesses, credit cards were a farking miracle.


Only if the credit card fee structure changes for merchants.  For places selling mostly small purchases, cash is still worth the hassle.
 
2021-10-23 9:04:42 AM  
$3000 a month, vs $15 an hour

Just going on the pay per hour, the robot is worth 200 hours.
Dividing that by 4 weeks is 50 hours per week
So as long as the robot can do the work of 2 people working 25 hours a week it is breaking even (ignoring the costs of electricity)

You then have the various robot advantages:
* they heal faster compared to a human (for larger injuries)
* they can be trained new skills in a matter of seconds (via data upload)
* they can work 16 hours a day and 7 days a week at full speed without complaint (the nightly 8 hours are for maintenance)
* they will never be late for their shift
* they will never call out for sick leave
* they will never start drama
* they can tolerate worse working conditions than a human
* this version (attached to the ceiling) cannot slip and fall due to floor debris/spills
* they can handle riskier situations with less worry (i.e. working with the fry vat and griddle repeatedly)

A single robot may not be able to handle rush hour as well as a having 2 people present, but it will provide a lot of capability and reliability for the more dangerous parts of a kitchen.
 
2021-10-23 9:07:55 AM  
Yeah, they've been saying this since the 50's.

aint nuthin gonna happin.jpg
 
2021-10-23 9:09:14 AM  

natazha: Chief Superintendent Lookout: This won't be any different than the time businesses were expanding self-checkout lanes and have been reducing them in favor or staffed cashier lanes. I love self-checkout lanes, but they weren't the boon to businesses and reduced labor as the concept was presented.

I've actually monitored self-checkout lanes.  Every six lanes requires a cashier to help people, but that is also the number of lanes required to replace one cashier with experience; so break-even at best*.  I'll use self-checkout if I have fewer than five items and they all have barcodes.

If the self-checkout is set too loud or badly programmed, I won't use it again at that store.

*One store I frequent, they use cashiers that have problems lifting heavy items, so that's a plus.


This is why Wegmans and Giant (and presumably other grocery stores) have supplemented self checkout lanes with apps. Customers scan the codes as they shop, come to the self-checkout lane, scan a code on the machine, and pay. Takes about 15 seconds to get through checkout because you do all the scanning beforehand.
 
2021-10-23 9:09:37 AM  
Something else to consider is how the supply chains are currently disrupted in ways no one thought would ever happen.

America is on Strike | Robert Reich
Youtube BZqEL1_E2OY
 
2021-10-23 9:11:47 AM  

Cthushi: they can work 16 hours a day and 7 days a week at full speed without complaint (the nightly 8 hours are for maintenance)


They work 24/7 until they break, then the repair tech is called.  They won't even stop to charge up, since they can swap battery packs at a charging station if they don't just use induction plates.

Maintenance would be scheduled downtime, maybe an hour a month for safety inspection and a few hours every once in a while for repair - which would likely be covered under contract with a maintenance company providing a temporary spare.  And yeah, they're going to outsource the maintenance because a restaurant wouldn't have enough work to have a full time repair tech.
 
2021-10-23 9:15:14 AM  

lifeslammer: NeoCortex42: discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.

The robot can run 24/7 and doesn't require benefits.

Robots are eventually going to take over a ton more jobs over time.  The whole paradigm of everybody needing to be employed to survive is going to have to change at some point.

HAHAHAHHAHAHAHHA god you are farking stupid if you think anything can run 24/7 without any downtime. If it breaks guess what, you just lost your ONLY source of production for whatever its doing. Given that its not a normal item, its going to require specialized repair services, which would possibly take it offline for weeks, if not months, depending on what broke.

Then you have to remember that the robot can ONLY do what it was programmed AND equipped to do. While basically anyone on BOH staff in any food business is fully cross trained in all of the basics, this things is not. It means that it is utterly useless during downtime when its not needed because it just takes up space and power, not switching over to a different task until things start to pick up again


Robots are good for things like brewing coffee. Not for anything in an actual kitchen


Yep. If/ when the CNC machine at work breaks to the point that we can't fix it we have to fly a tech in from Europe.
 
2021-10-23 9:15:16 AM  

Unsung_Hero: I don't think we ever should have allowed the abuses we all know happen in the service industry, never mind allowing them to become so standard that we no longer even think about it.

However, replacing service staff with robots isn't part of the abuse - it's just society evolving as technology develops.  If the robots are less expensive, you HAVE to use them or your business will go under as a new company pops up that does use them and kills you with its lower margins.

That of course assumes the robots are ready and a net savings.  I'm not sure they are yet, or McD's would have already automated their kitchens.  And until you have AI that can fool you into feeling like you're having a real social interaction, I don't think the kind of restaurant that has waiters will be replacing waiters any time soon.


Ive said elsewhere that full automation is still a ways off. Someone capable of running the grill and stuff will still be needed on hand to maintain Burger Bot  (restock, periodic cleaning, etc) as well as doing the actual cooking if Burger Bot broke down and the Hobart guy can't come out until tomorrow and the local peewee soccer team is coming in twenty minutes.
 
2021-10-23 9:20:15 AM  
If the robot can cook and salt my fries correctly, then I'm all for it.

/ I sound fat
 
2021-10-23 9:21:50 AM  

Unsung_Hero: Cthushi: they can work 16 hours a day and 7 days a week at full speed without complaint (the nightly 8 hours are for maintenance)

They work 24/7 until they break, then the repair tech is called.  They won't even stop to charge up, since they can swap battery packs at a charging station if they don't just use induction plates.

Maintenance would be scheduled downtime, maybe an hour a month for safety inspection and a few hours every once in a while for repair - which would likely be covered under contract with a maintenance company providing a temporary spare.  And yeah, they're going to outsource the maintenance because a restaurant wouldn't have enough work to have a full time repair tech.


Restaurants cut corners with cleanliness to meet health department standards.  Do you think they're going to follow proper maintenance schedules?  See my previous post about the infamous broken Taylor machines.  Keep dreaming.
 
2021-10-23 9:31:54 AM  
What I don't understand about the big picture:

If every company fires their workers and uses robots, then who will be able to afford whatever the companies produce?
 
2021-10-23 9:32:45 AM  

NeoCortex42: Robots are eventually going to take over a ton more jobs over time. The whole paradigm of everybody needing to be employed to survive is going to have to change at some point.


No it's not. We're just going to go right back to where we were in the 1800s, where people who were once productive of their own accord find their means of employment destroyed by automation (think of what the loom did to Britain.) Those people then go into the service industry. And, as these people enter the industry en masse, price is driven down, more people will start to work in 'microservice' like nannies, cleaners, personal chefs, elder care in the home, etc.

We're going back to a Victorian era where some people make huge amounts of money while others wait upon them like servants.
 
2021-10-23 9:37:13 AM  
Well someone's got to sell and service the robots so there will still be jobs; they'll just be different jobs.
 
2021-10-23 9:41:09 AM  

bostonguy: What I don't understand about the big picture:

If every company fires their workers and uses robots, then who will be able to afford whatever the companies produce?


Big picture?  HAH

That's a problem for the next CEO.
 
2021-10-23 9:51:39 AM  

discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.


Robots are guaranteed 'vid free
 
2021-10-23 9:55:53 AM  
I don't care how good of a job the robot did, I'm not tipping it
 
2021-10-23 10:00:47 AM  
Unsung_Hero:

That of course assumes the robots are ready and a net savings.  I'm not sure they are yet, or McD's would have already automated their kitchens. And until you have AI that can fool you into feeling like you're having a real social interaction, I don't think the kind of restaurant that has waiters will be replacing waiters any time soon.

Not yet, but the design concepts are already out there...

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-10-23 10:15:41 AM  

discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.


Really? Let's do some simple Excel math, shall we?

Fark user imageView Full Size

As you can see, even ONE employee at $10 per hour easily surpasses that $3.000 per month bar. Add two more employees for comparable coverage to the robot, and even waitresses at $3.50 per hour (plus tips) would cost more. Moral: if a company is willing to go full-coverage in service, robots are cheaper.
 
2021-10-23 10:18:43 AM  

NeoCortex42: discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.

The robot can run 24/7 and doesn't require benefits.

Robots are eventually going to take over a ton more jobs over time.  The whole paradigm of everybody needing to be employed to survive is going to have to change at some point.


I estimate 75% to 95% of all work can be automated within the next two decades. If a job can be described as a series of discrete tasks, it can be flowcharted and programmed. The rest is mere engineering.
 
2021-10-23 10:23:55 AM  

Chief Superintendent Lookout: NeoCortex42: discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.

The robot can run 24/7 and doesn't require benefits.

Robots are eventually going to take over a ton more jobs over time.  The whole paradigm of everybody needing to be employed to survive is going to have to change at some point.

Uh huh.  You just keep believing that myth.

FTC reportedly investigating McDonald's broken McFlurry machines

They Hacked McDonald's Ice Cream Machines-and Started a Cold War | WIRED

This won't be any different than the time businesses were expanding self-checkout lanes and have been reducing them in favor or staffed cashier lanes.  I love self-checkout lanes, but they weren't the boon to businesses and reduced labor as the concept was presented.


How is your horse whip business doing?
 
2021-10-23 10:24:09 AM  
Hope none of those robots need things like chips. Hear they are hard to get these days.
 
2021-10-23 10:25:50 AM  

Bathtub Cynic: Northern: discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.

Most McDonalds are already automated as much as possible.  You still need one person to operate the cash register and physically hand stuff in the drive through and watch the restaurant.
It's a similar story elsewhere.  Bleeding edge robotics are unreliable, absurdly expensive, and serious safety hazards.
This is a threat from the wealthy to deter unions and individual merit based pay raises at review time (note, Amazon has already converted to AI management for most of their employees).  There isn't any low hanging fruit, subby.

Won't need the cashier when hard currency is banned, which I expect to happen in my lifetime. It will start small, rewarded for only using plastic or an app, and eventually they will convince Congress to repeal whatever forces them to take hard currency now. Hard currency is actually a huge PITA for businesses, credit cards were a farking miracle.


Business owners are the ones stuck with credit card fees dumbass. THEY HATE THEM because they take so much money for no reason at all
 
2021-10-23 10:26:22 AM  

BolloxReader: Good. We do not have enough workers to go around especially if we are going to make more stuff here. I remember reading an article about manufacturing in Vietnam. The writer suggested to a guy coordinating deals there that Vietnam might be a replacement for China as a supplier for the US market and he laughed because China has a billion people and there was no way that any country could replace China as our supplier.

Certainly even making a little headway would mean automating the shiat out of everything else to free up enough people to work in assembly plants. There are a lot of jobs you can't really automate. Uncertainty will make more companies look at building new factories where they can find workers.


Yet.

In theory, any job that can be described as discrete tasks can be automated.
 
2021-10-23 10:28:14 AM  

lifeslammer: NeoCortex42: discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.

The robot can run 24/7 and doesn't require benefits.

Robots are eventually going to take over a ton more jobs over time.  The whole paradigm of everybody needing to be employed to survive is going to have to change at some point.

HAHAHAHHAHAHAHHA god you are farking stupid if you think anything can run 24/7 without any downtime. If it breaks guess what, you just lost your ONLY source of production for whatever its doing. Given that its not a normal item, its going to require specialized repair services, which would possibly take it offline for weeks, if not months, depending on what broke.

Then you have to remember that the robot can ONLY do what it was programmed AND equipped to do. While basically anyone on BOH staff in any food business is fully cross trained in all of the basics, this things is not. It means that it is utterly useless during downtime when its not needed because it just takes up space and power, not switching over to a different task until things start to pick up again


Robots are good for things like brewing coffee. Not for anything in an actual kitchen


LOL.
 
2021-10-23 10:29:09 AM  

Northern: discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.

Most McDonalds are already automated as much as possible.  You still need one person to operate the cash register and physically hand stuff in the drive through and watch the restaurant.
It's a similar story elsewhere.  Bleeding edge robotics are unreliable, absurdly expensive, and serious safety hazards.
This is a threat from the wealthy to deter unions and individual merit based pay raises at review time (note, Amazon has already converted to AI management for most of their employees).  There isn't any low hanging fruit, subby.


You are sooooo wrong.
 
2021-10-23 10:31:06 AM  

Unsung_Hero: A General Disdain For All Of Humanity: make it $35 per hour and a 4-day work week, so people actually get to LIVE instead of wasting their one chance at life on this planet slaving away behind a desk and only able to make dinner when they get home before they have to go to sleep and do it all again.

The problem with "the economy will make new jobs as robots take over the old ones" is that there's only so much trading of arts and crafts on Esty that people will do with each other.

What new jobs do you think might appear?  Even the arts are in danger of sloughing off most of their workers as computers will be able to replace everyone except in live performances coontil we have good enough robots for that too).

The basic needs of Maslow's Pyramid drive the economy.  If a robot digs ore out of the ground and refines it while another robot tends crops, a third raises livestock (if we don't just lab-grow the flesh), and a fourth delivers the final products to you... there's not a lot of need for humans in the economy.

We'll still argue over access to resources so there will still be rich and poor, but if you think the concentration of wealth is insane today just wait until the rich don't need the poor anymore and cut them out of the economy entirely... and live in territory that is safe and secured by robot soldiers while the poor are kept controlled by robot cops.  You know, until they finish starving because they aren't allowed to use the good farm land or drink the good water because some rich guy wants it for his 10th vacation property.


Who will the rich sell stuff to, to keep them rich?

Industrial mass production requires masses of buyers.
 
2021-10-23 10:33:06 AM  

Vhale: Hope none of those robots need things like chips. Hear they are hard to get these days.


They're called french fries. Speak American.
 
2021-10-23 10:34:23 AM  

discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.


Especially when that robot gets so coated in Fry Grease that the actuators seize up and the thing stops working. Enjoy the service bill for that one every two months.
 
2021-10-23 10:37:04 AM  

Chief Superintendent Lookout: NeoCortex42: discoballer: The robot can cost up to $3,000 a month.

It would be cheaper to pay a $15 minimum wage.

The robot can run 24/7 and doesn't require benefits.

Robots are eventually going to take over a ton more jobs over time.  The whole paradigm of everybody needing to be employed to survive is going to have to change at some point.

Uh huh.  You just keep believing that myth.

FTC reportedly investigating McDonald's broken McFlurry machines

They Hacked McDonald's Ice Cream Machines-and Started a Cold War | WIRED

This won't be any different than the time businesses were expanding self-checkout lanes and have been reducing them in favor or staffed cashier lanes.  I love self-checkout lanes, but they weren't the boon to businesses and reduced labor as the concept was presented.


One of the big problems with the self-checkout mines is you have some Karen that comes through with two full carts of groceries and insist on tying up half of the self-checkout section with two employees helping her scan all over her shiat.
 
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