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(Big Think)   No, the universe really can't be a billion years younger or older. 13.8 billion years is probably it   (bigthink.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Big Bang, Universe, modern stars, Physical cosmology, Cosmic microwave background radiation, Dark energy, General relativity, older number  
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987 clicks; posted to STEM » on 22 Oct 2021 at 8:42 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



27 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-10-22 8:54:13 AM  
No, we cant ever know the exact age until we can say with complete accuracy where the singularity of the big bang actually was in the universe, along with the correct speed of expansion and how much that has changed over the billions of years things have been going on

You would think a professional space guy would be slightly intelligent about space related matters, but Ethan seems to want to prove to everyone how far up his ass he shoved his head
 
2021-10-22 8:58:44 AM  

lifeslammer: we cant ever know the exact age until we can say with complete accuracy where the singularity of the big bang actually was in the universe


The answer to that is very well understood.
Everywhere.
 
2021-10-22 9:18:24 AM  

lifeslammer: No, we cant ever know the exact age until we can say with complete accuracy where the singularity of the big bang actually was in the universe, along with the correct speed of expansion and how much that has changed over the billions of years things have been going on

You would think a professional space guy would be slightly intelligent about space related matters, but Ethan seems to want to prove to everyone how far up his ass he shoved his head


No one believes that the Big Bang started as a singularity, and whatever it was happened everywhere, not at one point. You would know this if you studied it as much as science talking guy.
 
2021-10-22 9:25:04 AM  
One thing f the things people don't get about science is that it's often wrong, but largely self-correcting.  Especially the "hard sciences".

This may be partially why science is mistrusted by so many when the evidence that it works is all around them.  We couldn't have this modern technological society without the benefits of science.  But when you read X causes Y one day, and not long after you read X doesn't cause Y, you begin to question science.

Which, ironically, is what science is all about.  That's how it corrects itself.

The flip side of that equation is people who believe science, not in science. They take it as an article of faith, literally, that some scientific result that makes the news must be true.

This is also problematic, especially with the "soft sciences" which tend to be more politicized than the hard sciences, and at least some of them are suffering a "replication crisis" where a very large percentage of published results can't be duplicated by other researchers.

Long story short, science is about consensus based on testing, to the extent possible, the evidence.

Don't believe science, believe in science.
 
2021-10-22 9:25:46 AM  
Precisely 13.8 billion years.

Precisely somewhere within those tens to hundreds of millions of years.

Precisely.

With precision.

/Three shall be the number of the counting
//The number of the counting shall be three
//5 is right out!
 
2021-10-22 9:28:33 AM  

Tchernobog: Precisely 13.8 billion years.

Precisely somewhere within those tens to hundreds of millions of years.

Precisely.

With precision.

/Three shall be the number of the counting
//The number of the counting shall be three
//5 is right out!


It's actually 13,800,000,040 years old.  I know that because I read it was 13.8 billion years 40 years ago.
 
2021-10-22 9:51:17 AM  

Tchernobog: Precisely 13.8 billion years.

Precisely somewhere within those tens to hundreds of millions of years.

Precisely.

With precision.

/Three shall be the number of the counting
//The number of the counting shall be three
//5 is right out!


After the first bilion years it doesnt matter

1 billion seconds is abt 31.7 years
 
2021-10-22 9:51:56 AM  

dittybopper: Tchernobog: Precisely 13.8 billion years.

Precisely somewhere within those tens to hundreds of millions of years.

Precisely.

With precision.

/Three shall be the number of the counting
//The number of the counting shall be three
//5 is right out!

It's actually 13,800,000,040 years old.  I know that because I read it was 13.8 billion years 40 years ago.


And 4.489542 minutes
 
2021-10-22 10:25:22 AM  

Tchernobog: Precisely 13.8 billion years.

Precisely somewhere within those tens to hundreds of millions of years.

Precisely.

With precision.

/Three shall be the number of the counting
//The number of the counting shall be three
//5 is right out!


That is exactly what precision means. Nothing can be measured exactly, so you need to know the range of possible values.
 
2021-10-22 10:50:53 AM  

lifeslammer: No, we cant ever know the exact age until we can say with complete accuracy where the singularity of the big bang actually was in the universe, along with the correct speed of expansion and how much that has changed over the billions of years things have been going on

You would think a professional space guy would be slightly intelligent about space related matters, but Ethan seems to want to prove to everyone how far up his ass he shoved his head


e.lvme.meView Full Size
 
2021-10-22 11:11:15 AM  

revrendjim: Tchernobog: Precisely 13.8 billion years.

Precisely somewhere within those tens to hundreds of millions of years.

Precisely.

With precision.

/Three shall be the number of the counting
//The number of the counting shall be three
//5 is right out!

That is exactly what precision means. Nothing can be measured exactly, so you need to know the range of possible values.


Bruh if billions was an acceptable margin of error I would've gotten 100 on every physics test I ever took.


/Or it's possible I'm just being a smartass.
 
2021-10-22 12:36:09 PM  
Just because humans have a beginning and an end doesn't mean that the universe does ..
 
2021-10-22 12:42:27 PM  
It's 6,000 years old.

Damn heathens.
 
2021-10-22 12:46:11 PM  
All that sciency stuff is so much easier to understand if you accept that science has only been around for 4,000 years, or so.
 
2021-10-22 12:55:20 PM  

Moooooo K: All that sciency stuff is so much easier to understand if you accept that science has only been around for 4,000 years, or so.


Science has only really been around for 400 years.

I'm sure that it was people making fairly rational deductions, guesses, and testing results who were inventing stuff before then, but we didn't have a formal scientific method to follow.
 
2021-10-22 1:28:23 PM  

lifeslammer: No, we cant ever know the exact age until we can say with complete accuracy where the singularity of the big bang actually was in the universe, along with the correct speed of expansion and how much that has changed over the billions of years things have been going on

You would think a professional space guy would be slightly intelligent about space related matters, but Ethan seems to want to prove to everyone how far up his ass he shoved his head


How I imagine you
mpng.subpng.comView Full Size
 
2021-10-22 1:53:36 PM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: It's 6,000 years old.

Damn heathens.


I wish my name was Heath Damnens.  I guess I could change it.
 
2021-10-22 1:57:24 PM  

lifeslammer: No, we cant ever know the exact age until we can say with complete accuracy where the singularity of the big bang actually was in the universe, along with the correct speed of expansion and how much that has changed over the billions of years things have been going on

You would think a professional space guy would be slightly intelligent about space related matters, but Ethan seems to want to prove to everyone how far up his ass he shoved his head


Show us where in your brain did Ethan touch you?
 
2021-10-22 1:59:10 PM  

dittybopper: One thing f the things people don't get about science is that it's often wrong, but largely self-correcting.  Especially the "hard sciences".

This may be partially why science is mistrusted by so many when the evidence that it works is all around them.  We couldn't have this modern technological society without the benefits of science.  But when you read X causes Y one day, and not long after you read X doesn't cause Y, you begin to question science.

Which, ironically, is what science is all about.  That's how it corrects itself.

The flip side of that equation is people who believe science, not in science. They take it as an article of faith, literally, that some scientific result that makes the news must be true.

This is also problematic, especially with the "soft sciences" which tend to be more politicized than the hard sciences, and at least some of them are suffering a "replication crisis" where a very large percentage of published results can't be duplicated by other researchers.

Long story short, science is about consensus based on testing, to the extent possible, the evidence.

Don't believe science, believe in science.


Well, that's the problem with many people no matter the source or topic...

Things and people aren't Right or Wrong, Black & White
Including science

But many expect this
Heck, many are upset with this.

Life, people and science can change
This is often situational, contextual and how we improve and tweak.
Many cannot accept this.

So we get many confused and angry people.

Deal with complexity and dynamics
That's how everything works.
 
2021-10-22 1:59:58 PM  
Why couldn't the universe have existed prior to the big bang?  Like, maybe a big bang particle was hanging around a few billion years and then decided to bang?  Or an oscillating universe?

The concept that the big bang meant something came from nothing is so unexplainable that any claims of knowing anything before that point are shenanigans. I suppose one could define anything pre-big-bang as not part of the Universe.
 
2021-10-22 2:03:11 PM  
Depends on if you think it's
The Big Bang
Or
a big bang

IMHO, it's more likely the 2nd
If history trends true as it's done before the more complex scenarios if most often found true over time.
 
2021-10-22 2:12:03 PM  

Smackledorfer: Why couldn't the universe have existed prior to the big bang?  Like, maybe a big bang particle was hanging around a few billion years and then decided to bang?  Or an oscillating universe?

The concept that the big bang meant something came from nothing is so unexplainable that any claims of knowing anything before that point are shenanigans. I suppose one could define anything pre-big-bang as not part of the Universe.


I like Penrose's theory, Conformal Cyclic Cosmology. That at long enough time scales, even mass decays and we're left with a universe with nothing but massless particles traveling at C. Which, from their perspective, do not experience time, and with no other extant perspectives, does time even exist anymore? Without time, is there even the concept of distance? So, Penrose argues, we end up with a state resembling the initial conditions of the big bang, and the whole thing starts up again.

/probably explained that very, very badly
 
2021-10-22 5:21:07 PM  

Smackledorfer: Why couldn't the universe have existed prior to the big bang?  Like, maybe a big bang particle was hanging around a few billion years and then decided to bang?  Or an oscillating universe?

The concept that the big bang meant something came from nothing is so unexplainable that any claims of knowing anything before that point are shenanigans. I suppose one could define anything pre-big-bang as not part of the Universe.


It's possible. At the moment, we have lots of evidence for the Big Bang and when that occurred. We have no evidence to constrain what led to that moment, or even whether "before the Big Bang" is a concept that makes sense.
 
2021-10-22 5:54:26 PM  
precisely 13.8 billion years

You can't just redefine words like that.
 
2021-10-22 6:08:15 PM  
There's a massive difference between the observable universe and the entire universe
 
2021-10-23 6:22:04 AM  

Pharmdawg: There's a massive difference between the observable universe and the entire universe


If a Universe falls in the woods with no one to observe it, then does it make an existence?
 
2021-10-23 12:25:10 PM  

Pharmdawg: There's a massive difference between the observable universe and the entire universe


Yes, but that difference in mass has physicists puzzled.  Thus: Dark Massive Difference!
 
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