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(Onion AV Club)   Grab some spice and prepare yourself for this Dune primer   (avclub.com) divider line
    More: PSA, Bene Gesserit, Paul Atreides, Lady Jessica, Dune universe, Dune, House Atreides, past adaptations of Frank Herbert, Leto Atreides I  
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620 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 22 Oct 2021 at 6:05 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-10-22 5:04:06 AM  
This one is quicker and easier.

A Shit History of Dune
Youtube jW23TeqMiXk
 
2021-10-22 6:09:49 AM  
So far I'm impressed by the cast and performances, okay with the effects and scenery, and really wishing it moved along faster. It makes the Lynch version seem like a rollercoaster ride!

Stock up on Red Bull or something while watching to stay awake.
 
2021-10-22 6:11:29 AM  
If the sandworms are so tough how come Geena Davis was able to ride one?
 
2021-10-22 6:27:57 AM  
About 4 weeks
 
2021-10-22 6:30:57 AM  

Boojum2k: So far I'm impressed by the cast and performances, okay with the effects and scenery, and really wishing it moved along faster. It makes the Lynch version seem like a rollercoaster ride!

Stock up on Red Bull or something while watching to stay awake.


I reread the first book a few years back. I'm not convinced that story can be carried by film. Inspire film, yes. But expressing that first book with film is like using marble to express a gossamer.
 
2021-10-22 6:34:06 AM  
SNL needs to do a Dune/Pumpkin Spice skit.

Dunkin Donuts invades Irakis. or,better yet (and way cheaper to produce) Moadib goes to Starbucks.
 
2021-10-22 6:37:11 AM  
As long as I get to see those spice ninjas blasting away with those word guns, I'm happy..
 
2021-10-22 6:43:11 AM  

born_yesterday: As long as I get to see those spice ninjas blasting away with those word guns, I'm happy..


I have bad news for you.
 
2021-10-22 6:49:48 AM  
I've been looking forward to this, having been a fan of the books as a kid. I will be a bit miffed if a primer is required. The film should stand on its own and sjnce the production on the second part hinges on the success of the first, word of mouth by people who aren't familiar wit the source material could smother the whole thing in the cradle.

I'd one of the reasons I hated the Harry Potter movies except the third. I hadn't read the books so character motivations didn't make any sense. I read the books a few years later and still think the whole thing is kind of facile, but at least I knew why people were doing what they were doing.
 
2021-10-22 6:50:40 AM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: If the sandworms are so tough how come Geena Davis was able to ride one?


Who wouldn't want to be ridden by Geena?
 
2021-10-22 6:51:01 AM  
Tickets to see this in IMAX tomorrow, because Villaneuve always delivers in the theater.  Hoping it's good enough to warrant several rewatches on HBO Max.
 
2021-10-22 6:55:13 AM  

Ragin' Asian: I've been looking forward to this, having been a fan of the books as a kid. I will be a bit miffed if a primer is required.


It isn't.
 
2021-10-22 7:00:08 AM  

born_yesterday: As long as I get to see those spice ninjas blasting away with those word guns, I'm happy..


Punch this rock, now yell at it, now let me show you some shiat you won't believe.

Fark user imageView Full Size


These people are drinking their own piss and this dipshiat kid shows up and says drag a big ass obelisk here for my timeshare sales pitch which involves humiliation and making a mess.

Get farked.
 
2021-10-22 7:00:37 AM  
I watched it last night as soon as it became available.  It was fantastic--everything I hoped it would be.  I look forward to the next movie.
 
2021-10-22 7:29:30 AM  
I watched it last night. I really enjoyed basically everything besides the person on person combat.
 
2021-10-22 8:01:59 AM  
Very good movie and I'm looking forward to part 2.
 
2021-10-22 8:39:34 AM  

EnzoTheCoder: I watched it last night as soon as it became available.  It was fantastic--everything I hoped it would be.  I look forward to the next movie.


I just assumed they were going to mirror what happened with the books and never finish - leaving it for someone else to come along later and hilariously fark it up.
 
2021-10-22 8:42:33 AM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: If the sandworms are so tough how come Geena Davis was able to ride one?



Loomis: Ten thousand Solari for a sandworm!
Phyllis: And a blow job!
 
2021-10-22 8:44:01 AM  

LewDux: Mr. Coffee Nerves: If the sandworms are so tough how come Geena Davis was able to ride one?


Loomis: Ten thousand Solari for a sandworm!
Phyllis: And a blow job!


"Three thieves successfully rob a Spice stash, but making the escape from Arrakis proves to be almost impossible."
 
2021-10-22 8:45:15 AM  
"Shai hulud. Honk honk"
 
2021-10-22 8:50:25 AM  

LewDux: Mr. Coffee Nerves: If the sandworms are so tough how come Geena Davis was able to ride one?


Loomis: Ten thousand Solari for a sandworm!
Phyllis: And a blow job!


Can't wait to see Paul try and bacck one of those sandworms up.

"I SAW A SIGN, PHYLLIS!"
 
2021-10-22 8:55:06 AM  

Tom Marvolo Bombadil: EnzoTheCoder: I watched it last night as soon as it became available.  It was fantastic--everything I hoped it would be.  I look forward to the next movie.

I just assumed they were going to mirror what happened with the books and never finish - leaving it for someone else to come along later and hilariously fark it up.


There is no way in the world they were going to be able to mirror the book; I just finished the movie I love what they have done with it.

The ornithopters are everything that I wanted them to be and now I want one.

One of the scenes I really wish they had found a way to incorporate into the movie was the state dinner. The political Intrigue was one of my favorite parts of that scene.

As far as the shields and the combat are concerned I don't understand what everyone's problem is, the slow blade penetrates the shield and that's exactly what we saw.
 
2021-10-22 9:15:40 AM  

Ragin' Asian: I've been looking forward to this, having been a fan of the books as a kid. I will be a bit miffed if a primer is required.


Absolutely isnt.
 
2021-10-22 9:20:59 AM  
Just finished it, and it reminds me of why, though I respect the scope and artistry of the original work, it's simply not my favorite science fiction project. It is fairly faithful retelling, and that is part of the issue, in that Herbert wrote essentially without much humor. He told a grand and epic tale, full of detail but deadly serious. Always. Which, the story is. It wouldn't be Dune if it had some levity on occasion, but it's also what keeps Dune on shelf, while other books get picked up and read over and over again. This is far from a bad retelling, and faithful to the book, but it feels like it should be a miniseries, not a full blown trilogy. It's stylish, it's properly epic, and entirely without humor. Which, is faithful to the books, as really the only joyful human is Duncan, and Momoa does the character justice. The atmosphere is right for the book, it is faithful to the roots, and is deadly...dull. Pretty, and the visual choices are impressive, but you read Dune for the ideas of where humanity could be going, not because it's a particularly enjoyable story. It's a playground of ideas, and in that it serves, but it is nigh antiseptic where human emotion is concerned--which is, again, entirely faithful to the book. Herbert liked to write about people and the future as a subject, but as a study in dynamics, not as characters that he himself even liked or enjoyed. He studied people, but his books made it seem that he never wanted to actually mix with them. He was fascinated by ideas, by questions, and his books let him explore those.
 
2021-10-22 9:35:15 AM  

hubiestubert: Just finished it, and it reminds me of why, though I respect the scope and artistry of the original work, it's simply not my favorite science fiction project. It is fairly faithful retelling, and that is part of the issue, in that Herbert wrote essentially without much humor. He told a grand and epic tale, full of detail but deadly serious. Always. Which, the story is. It wouldn't be Dune if it had some levity on occasion, but it's also what keeps Dune on shelf, while other books get picked up and read over and over again. This is far from a bad retelling, and faithful to the book, but it feels like it should be a miniseries, not a full blown trilogy. It's stylish, it's properly epic, and entirely without humor. Which, is faithful to the books, as really the only joyful human is Duncan, and Momoa does the character justice. The atmosphere is right for the book, it is faithful to the roots, and is deadly...dull. Pretty, and the visual choices are impressive, but you read Dune for the ideas of where humanity could be going, not because it's a particularly enjoyable story. It's a playground of ideas, and in that it serves, but it is nigh antiseptic where human emotion is concerned--which is, again, entirely faithful to the book. Herbert liked to write about people and the future as a subject, but as a study in dynamics, not as characters that he himself even liked or enjoyed. He studied people, but his books made it seem that he never wanted to actually mix with them. He was fascinated by ideas, by questions, and his books let him explore those.


That actually goes a long way towards explaining me as well. Generally speaking I like humanity and I want to see where they can go in the future. The problem is that I don't very much like what we are now and don't trust us very much.

This goes a long way into explaining why I have read that the entire series multiple times.
 
2021-10-22 9:38:01 AM  

rummonkey: Tom Marvolo Bombadil: EnzoTheCoder: I watched it last night as soon as it became available.  It was fantastic--everything I hoped it would be.  I look forward to the next movie.

I just assumed they were going to mirror what happened with the books and never finish - leaving it for someone else to come along later and hilariously fark it up.

There is no way in the world they were going to be able to mirror the book; I just finished the movie I love what they have done with it.

The ornithopters are everything that I wanted them to be and now I want one.

One of the scenes I really wish they had found a way to incorporate into the movie was the state dinner. The political Intrigue was one of my favorite parts of that scene.

As far as the shields and the combat are concerned I don't understand what everyone's problem is, the slow blade penetrates the shield and that's exactly what we saw.


I believe the kids call that "soaking" nowadays.
 
2021-10-22 10:07:44 AM  
Wife and I watched it last night; I've read the books and she has not, so was an interesting case study.

She was most definitely confused at times, if for no other reason that familiarity with the material helps one parse the movie's occasional attempts at narrative through fast-paced cutting scenes.

I would say there are some glaring omissions in the worldbuilding narrative of the movie. Most notably in the lack of explanation for why there are no beefy computers and why their tech development followed an almost purely mechanical/biological path. I actually had to pause it about halfway through to explain this to my wife, and I could see the lightbulb come on.

As has already been said in this thread, Herbert trucked with ideas, and not so much characters. So the plot of the story is extremely easy to follow, even for someone not at all familiar with the setting. The extent to which the movie's narrative style provides adequate context for that plot, on the other hand, is debatable.
 
2021-10-22 10:10:56 AM  

olrasputin: Wife and I watched it last night; I've read the books and she has not, so was an interesting case study.

She was most definitely confused at times, if for no other reason that familiarity with the material helps one parse the movie's occasional attempts at narrative through fast-paced cutting scenes.

I would say there are some glaring omissions in the worldbuilding narrative of the movie. Most notably in the lack of explanation for why there are no beefy computers and why their tech development followed an almost purely mechanical/biological path. I actually had to pause it about halfway through to explain this to my wife, and I could see the lightbulb come on.


Whereas my wife now goes around saying, "use the voice!"
 
2021-10-22 10:13:46 AM  

rummonkey: hubiestubert: Just finished it, and it reminds me of why, though I respect the scope and artistry of the original work, it's simply not my favorite science fiction project. It is fairly faithful retelling, and that is part of the issue, in that Herbert wrote essentially without much humor. He told a grand and epic tale, full of detail but deadly serious. Always. Which, the story is. It wouldn't be Dune if it had some levity on occasion, but it's also what keeps Dune on shelf, while other books get picked up and read over and over again. This is far from a bad retelling, and faithful to the book, but it feels like it should be a miniseries, not a full blown trilogy. It's stylish, it's properly epic, and entirely without humor. Which, is faithful to the books, as really the only joyful human is Duncan, and Momoa does the character justice. The atmosphere is right for the book, it is faithful to the roots, and is deadly...dull. Pretty, and the visual choices are impressive, but you read Dune for the ideas of where humanity could be going, not because it's a particularly enjoyable story. It's a playground of ideas, and in that it serves, but it is nigh antiseptic where human emotion is concerned--which is, again, entirely faithful to the book. Herbert liked to write about people and the future as a subject, but as a study in dynamics, not as characters that he himself even liked or enjoyed. He studied people, but his books made it seem that he never wanted to actually mix with them. He was fascinated by ideas, by questions, and his books let him explore those.

That actually goes a long way towards explaining me as well. Generally speaking I like humanity and I want to see where they can go in the future. The problem is that I don't very much like what we are now and don't trust us very much.

This goes a long way into explaining why I have read that the entire series multiple times.


Nothing wrong with thought experiments. I mean, Lord of the Rings was a way for Tolkien to get paid for his fetish for languages and weird history. Pretty much Asimov's entire career is based on such things. Herbert did submarine thrillers and stories about Indian boys and white settlers, and Dune is where he got some fame, but Hellstrom's Hive and the Dosadi Experiment were still books essentially as thought experiments, same for Whipping Star--which had more human characters than Dune ever did, despite being about pure democracy running amok--even. Themes of ecology and politics ran through his work often, and his career is essentially a guide to what he was into at the time, and coming back to the future of humanity as it might play out.
 
2021-10-22 11:50:15 AM  

rummonkey: Tom Marvolo Bombadil: EnzoTheCoder: I watched it last night as soon as it became available.  It was fantastic--everything I hoped it would be.  I look forward to the next movie.

I just assumed they were going to mirror what happened with the books and never finish - leaving it for someone else to come along later and hilariously fark it up.

There is no way in the world they were going to be able to mirror the book; I just finished the movie I love what they have done with it.

The ornithopters are everything that I wanted them to be and now I want one.

One of the scenes I really wish they had found a way to incorporate into the movie was the state dinner. The political Intrigue was one of my favorite parts of that scene.

As far as the shields and the combat are concerned I don't understand what everyone's problem is, the slow blade penetrates the shield and that's exactly what we saw.


And during the orbital bombardment phase of the attack it showed the bombs slowing to penetrate the shields. Even had Duncan flicking a bullet away that was traveling too fast to penetrate his shield. The film has lots of little touches like that that are nods to the book, but won't be extremely obvious to people not familiar with the book.
 
2021-10-22 12:11:04 PM  

rummonkey: Tom Marvolo Bombadil: EnzoTheCoder: I watched it last night as soon as it became available.  It was fantastic--everything I hoped it would be.  I look forward to the next movie.

I just assumed they were going to mirror what happened with the books and never finish - leaving it for someone else to come along later and hilariously fark it up.

There is no way in the world they were going to be able to mirror the book; I just finished the movie I love what they have done with it.

The ornithopters are everything that I wanted them to be and now I want one.

One of the scenes I really wish they had found a way to incorporate into the movie was the state dinner. The political Intrigue was one of my favorite parts of that scene.

As far as the shields and the combat are concerned I don't understand what everyone's problem is, the slow blade penetrates the shield and that's exactly what we saw.


I liked the Lynch version of the shields because it looks like two Minecraft characters having a slap-fight.

Dune (2/9) Movie CLIP - Shield Practice (1984) HD
Youtube KYUolurihOQ
 
2021-10-22 12:20:42 PM  

dsmith42: rummonkey: Tom Marvolo Bombadil: EnzoTheCoder: I watched it last night as soon as it became available.  It was fantastic--everything I hoped it would be.  I look forward to the next movie.

I just assumed they were going to mirror what happened with the books and never finish - leaving it for someone else to come along later and hilariously fark it up.

There is no way in the world they were going to be able to mirror the book; I just finished the movie I love what they have done with it.

The ornithopters are everything that I wanted them to be and now I want one.

One of the scenes I really wish they had found a way to incorporate into the movie was the state dinner. The political Intrigue was one of my favorite parts of that scene.

As far as the shields and the combat are concerned I don't understand what everyone's problem is, the slow blade penetrates the shield and that's exactly what we saw.

And during the orbital bombardment phase of the attack it showed the bombs slowing to penetrate the shields. Even had Duncan flicking a bullet away that was traveling too fast to penetrate his shield. The film has lots of little touches like that that are nods to the book, but won't be extremely obvious to people not familiar with the book.


I also liked how they kept momentum transfer when heavier objects were stopped by personal shields.
 
2021-10-22 2:15:29 PM  
I got the book a few months ago in the hopes that it would inspire my new Fark Fiction Anthology entry. Turned out it wasn't quite what I was expecting and didn't. Kept reading it for a while anyway and then got into rereading something else maybe 15% of the way through when I got its sequel for my birthday. What can I say, I'm a slow reader if I'm not absolutely enraptured with what I'm reading.

Will I need to read this primer to understand the movie?
 
2021-10-22 2:36:42 PM  
Oblig.:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-10-22 4:40:46 PM  

Fireproof: I got the book a few months ago in the hopes that it would inspire my new Fark Fiction Anthology entry. Turned out it wasn't quite what I was expecting and didn't. Kept reading it for a while anyway and then got into rereading something else maybe 15% of the way through when I got its sequel for my birthday. What can I say, I'm a slow reader if I'm not absolutely enraptured with what I'm reading.

Will I need to read this primer to understand the movie?


Read it. Good news is I already knew about 3/4 of that.
 
2021-10-22 11:48:43 PM  
Just finished the new version. My take on the new one in comparison to the old one.

Chani ha ha we got the kids in the theater by putting you on the poster but hardly in the movie that's not even half the book
Duncan better, I like more Duncan
Feyd fark YOU WHERE IS FEYD
Gurney this is an Oscar performance in a timeline without Patrick Stewart
Jessica badass so much more badass
Leto better amusingly Poe
Liet Kynes as good, diversity is nice
Paul as good ... maybe worse ... I mean sure he's young but this kid's like a buck o five
Piter oh look he's dead and gone back to Ant Man sequels I guess
Rabban better ragey
RevMoGHM worse lame
Sardukkar better backstory
Stilgar what are you Donald Sutherland from Kelly's Heroes?
Thufir meh this actor was great in other movies so some scriptwriter let us down
Vladimir as good ... maybe better ... like a creepy fat octopus
 
2021-10-22 11:58:06 PM  
hubiestubert:
Nothing wrong with thought experiments. I mean, Lord of the Rings was a way for Tolkien to get paid for his fetish for languages and weird history. Pretty much Asimov's entire career is based on such things. Herbert did submarine thrillers and stories about Indian boys and white settlers, and Dune is where he got some fame, but Hellstrom's Hive and the Dosadi Experiment were still books essentially as thought experiments, same for Whipping Star--which had more human characters than Dune ever did, despite being about pure democracy running amok--even. Themes of ecology and politics ran through his work often, and his career is essentially a guide to what he was into at the time, and coming back to the future of humanity as it might play out. ...

I have also read Hellstrom's Hive.  Good book.  A friend asked me if it was about a dysfunctional family, and I replied that it was about a functional family.  An extremely functional family.

Here is an interview Frank Herbert did where he explained how he came up with the material for Dune (plus other environmental issues):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LfPv​1​U7MpQ

Good quote from him in this clip:
"I refuse to be put in the position of having to tell my grandchildren 'I'm sorry there is no more world for you, we used it all up' "
 
2021-10-23 2:53:38 AM  

Cthushi: hubiestubert:
Nothing wrong with thought experiments. I mean, Lord of the Rings was a way for Tolkien to get paid for his fetish for languages and weird history. Pretty much Asimov's entire career is based on such things. Herbert did submarine thrillers and stories about Indian boys and white settlers, and Dune is where he got some fame, but Hellstrom's Hive and the Dosadi Experiment were still books essentially as thought experiments, same for Whipping Star--which had more human characters than Dune ever did, despite being about pure democracy running amok--even. Themes of ecology and politics ran through his work often, and his career is essentially a guide to what he was into at the time, and coming back to the future of humanity as it might play out. ...

I have also read Hellstrom's Hive.  Good book.  A friend asked me if it was about a dysfunctional family, and I replied that it was about a functional family.  An extremely functional family.

Here is an interview Frank Herbert did where he explained how he came up with the material for Dune (plus other environmental issues):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3LfPv1​U7MpQ

Good quote from him in this clip:
"I refuse to be put in the position of having to tell my grandchildren 'I'm sorry there is no more world for you, we used it all up' "

Environmentalism is a fad. It'll blow over in a generation, and people will look back and try to analyze what made humanity so aggressively and obsessively self-important for a couple of decades.
 
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