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(YouTube)   SpaceX StarShip SN20 static fire tonight. This is the one that is going to fly on the orbital test. Maybe boom today   (youtube.com) divider line
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557 clicks; posted to STEM » and Discussion » on 21 Oct 2021 at 8:00 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-10-21 7:42:02 PM  
Do you have the time they're doing this, submitter?
 
2021-10-21 7:43:41 PM  

Bathia_Mapes: Do you have the time they're doing this, submitter?


they are doing it now. there's no official timeline from SpaceX but tank activities have already started so I would guess within the hour.

Once Raptor chill starts its under 10 minutes.
 
2021-10-21 8:00:15 PM  

khitsicker: Bathia_Mapes: Do you have the time they're doing this, submitter?

they are doing it now. there's no official timeline from SpaceX but tank activities have already started so I would guess within the hour.

Once Raptor chill starts its under 10 minutes.


Thanks!
 
2021-10-21 8:00:59 PM  

Bathia_Mapes: khitsicker: Bathia_Mapes: Do you have the time they're doing this, submitter?

they are doing it now. there's no official timeline from SpaceX but tank activities have already started so I would guess within the hour.

Once Raptor chill starts its under 10 minutes.

Thanks!


np. They are estimating ~20 minutes now. just heard.
 
2021-10-21 8:07:46 PM  
memegenerator.netView Full Size
 
2021-10-21 8:10:09 PM  
I saw Raptor Chill at the Palladium in 93. Great show.
 
2021-10-21 8:10:48 PM  
Should be within the next seven minutes or so.
 
2021-10-21 8:11:25 PM  
Gotta love the pulsing vent.
 
2021-10-21 8:12:25 PM  
90 seconds (ish)
 
2021-10-21 8:16:11 PM  
Anyone hear anything about the public comment sessions re: the FAA Environmental Report?
 
2021-10-21 8:16:54 PM  
thar she blows!
 
2021-10-21 8:17:18 PM  
THAR SHE BLOWS!
 
2021-10-21 8:18:16 PM  
Looked successful, nothing extra blew up!
 
2021-10-21 8:18:17 PM  
So... No Ka-Boom.
 
2021-10-21 8:18:38 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Anyone hear anything about the public comment sessions re: the FAA Environmental Report?


a lot of people biatching and moaning about environmental impacts.
 
2021-10-21 8:18:43 PM  
Test completed just as I opened the link.  No big bada boom.
 
2021-10-21 8:19:02 PM  

cameroncrazy1984: Looked successful, nothing extra blew up!


they lost a couple tiles.
 
2021-10-21 8:20:06 PM  

khitsicker: cameroncrazy1984: Looked successful, nothing extra blew up!

they lost a couple tiles.


The same thing happened in my bathroom after Taco Bell one time.
 
2021-10-21 8:21:55 PM  

markie_farkie: khitsicker: cameroncrazy1984: Looked successful, nothing extra blew up!

they lost a couple tiles.

The same thing happened in my bathroom after Taco Bell one time.


similarly it would have also been due to a large exhaust of compressed methane.
 
2021-10-21 8:27:33 PM  
(peeks disconsolately)
 
2021-10-21 8:39:24 PM  
Angry Astronaut has an interesting piece about all the things that still need to happen outside of the vehicle itself.

The launch facility needs a *hefty* water deluge system.
*That* needs a HUGE amount of water, and it has to be fresh (or desalinated) water.
*That* means they need a honkin' big desalination plant.
*That* needs a 250 MW power plant.

That adds up to a mind-boggling amount of planning, designing, building, financing, and approval paperwork.

Then there's the question of fuel - drill for natural gas there and make their own methane?  Make their own LOX?  Also a mind-boggling amount of planning, designing, building, financing, and approvals.

With all of that, it would be amazing if this didn't shift from an FAA environmental study to a full-blown Department of the Interior Environmental Impact Study.

Here's the piece, for those who haven't looked closely at these aspects of the situation:

NEW STARSHIP INFO!! What's going on with Starship and the FAA? When is orbit REALLY possible??
Youtube k1w3-PKKdrc
 
2021-10-21 8:50:21 PM  
Looks like they're doing another try. Still a lot of chilling going on.
 
2021-10-21 8:50:21 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: That adds up to a mind-boggling amount of planning, designing, building, financing, and approval paperwork.

Then there's the question of fuel - drill for natural gas there and make their own methane?  Make their own LOX?  Also a mind-boggling amount of planning, designing, building, financing, and approvals.

With all of that, it would be amazing if this didn't shift from an FAA environmental study to a full-blown Department of the Interior Environmental Impact Study.


I'm surprised they haven't tried to reuse the abandoned LNG port plan, since that was mostly stamped and waiting.
 
2021-10-21 8:53:38 PM  
OK, I posted the above in a hurry, to get it into the thread before everyone left.

After a little more consideration, I think the analysis presented by Angry Astronaut needs a review and verification.  The issues are still important, but the numbers might be based on bad premises.

All of his stuff is based on a Tech Crunch article.  I haven't seen that; is it accurate?  Are the power requirements *really* that high?  Surely the desal plant doesn't need to run 24 x 7 x 365; could the water be captured (or mostly captured) and reused?  (If so, I bet it'll need damn good filtering, to avoid damage, but should still lead to more efficiency.)

Most of the questioning seems to focus on the deluge system.  I don't know what kind of issues might crop up with regard to the Fuel.

But in *any* case, I think there's a longer road before we get to orbital flight than we've really considered.
 
2021-10-21 8:57:03 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-10-21 9:02:42 PM  
Any bets on whether there's more to come tonight?
 
2021-10-21 9:03:06 PM  

khitsicker: [Fark user image 850x416]


*Gorgeous* shot!
 
2021-10-21 9:05:28 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Any bets on whether there's more to come tonight?


NSF thinks so
 
2021-10-21 9:05:41 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Any bets on whether there's more to come tonight?


Elon says they are going to try again.
 
2021-10-21 9:15:57 PM  
No destruction.

I will allow it.
 
2021-10-21 9:16:27 PM  

khitsicker: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Any bets on whether there's more to come tonight?

Elon says they are going to try again.


I'm only seeing Elon retweeting the SpaceX tweet about the first time that a vac Raptor was fired. We don't know if there will be a second tonight, but if not then they're spending a lot of cryo liquids for other reasons.
 
2021-10-21 9:19:31 PM  
There we GO!
 
2021-10-21 9:19:52 PM  
Baby cleared her throat again!
 
2021-10-21 9:19:57 PM  
w000t second fire good! looks to be much bigger than the first.
 
2021-10-21 9:20:22 PM  
POOF
 
2021-10-21 9:21:26 PM  
I love that the commentators missed it.
 
2021-10-21 9:21:44 PM  
They're still keeping the pressure on.
 
2021-10-21 9:22:53 PM  

WelldeadLink: They're still keeping the pressure on.


Oops. Looks like they might be depressurizing.
 
2021-10-21 9:25:35 PM  
Lol I thought I missed it was just about to turn of the stream when they fired it off again. Whew! Spiffy! No boom.

/ So far. Vented so it seems we're done. Maybe.
 
2021-10-21 9:27:11 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: OK, I posted the above in a hurry, to get it into the thread before everyone left.

After a little more consideration, I think the analysis presented by Angry Astronaut needs a review and verification.  The issues are still important, but the numbers might be based on bad premises.

All of his stuff is based on a Tech Crunch article.  I haven't seen that; is it accurate?  Are the power requirements *really* that high?  Surely the desal plant doesn't need to run 24 x 7 x 365; could the water be captured (or mostly captured) and reused?  (If so, I bet it'll need damn good filtering, to avoid damage, but should still lead to more efficiency.)

Most of the questioning seems to focus on the deluge system.  I don't know what kind of issues might crop up with regard to the Fuel.

But in *any* case, I think there's a longer road before we get to orbital flight than we've really considered.


Musk made the comment in the interview with Everyday Astronaut that "Stage 0" was both far more expensive and harder to replace than a Starship.  if you look at the scale of what they are building it's easy to believe- the massive size of the pad and launch equipment as well as the amount of support stuff is staggering
 
2021-10-21 9:37:06 PM  

Glockenspiel Hero: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: OK, I posted the above in a hurry, to get it into the thread before everyone left.

After a little more consideration, I think the analysis presented by Angry Astronaut needs a review and verification.  The issues are still important, but the numbers might be based on bad premises.

All of his stuff is based on a Tech Crunch article.  I haven't seen that; is it accurate?  Are the power requirements *really* that high?  Surely the desal plant doesn't need to run 24 x 7 x 365; could the water be captured (or mostly captured) and reused?  (If so, I bet it'll need damn good filtering, to avoid damage, but should still lead to more efficiency.)

Most of the questioning seems to focus on the deluge system.  I don't know what kind of issues might crop up with regard to the Fuel.

But in *any* case, I think there's a longer road before we get to orbital flight than we've really considered.

Musk made the comment in the interview with Everyday Astronaut that "Stage 0" was both far more expensive and harder to replace than a Starship.  if you look at the scale of what they are building it's easy to believe- the massive size of the pad and launch equipment as well as the amount of support stuff is staggering


When I first heard talk about catching the booster with the launch tower, I laughed it off as a really good joke.  I could not *conceive* that that could be serious - even with the return landing precision they've already demonstrated for Falcon.  The masses, the speeds, the energies, the piss-your-pants frightening prospect of the scale of the disaster in the event of a miss - *surely* no sane person would propose such a thing!

OK, I admit it.  I was not prepared to Think BIG.

Clearly, they believe they can pull it off.

And if it works, it's a helluva boost for reusability and turnaround time.
 
2021-10-21 9:39:16 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: OK, I admit it.  I was not prepared to Think BIG.


The ghosts of John W. Campbell, Robert A. Heinlein, and E. E. 'Doc' Smith are smiling in approval at the chutzpah of Elon Musk.

And Delos D. Harriman is *jealous*.
 
2021-10-21 9:46:50 PM  

Glockenspiel Hero: Musk made the comment in the interview with Everyday Astronaut that "Stage 0" was both far more expensive and harder to replace than a Starship.  if you look at the scale of what they are building it's easy to believe- the massive size of the pad and launch equipment as well as the amount of support stuff is staggering


naval-technology.comView Full Size
 
2021-10-21 9:49:10 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: Glockenspiel Hero: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: OK, I posted the above in a hurry, to get it into the thread before everyone left.

After a little more consideration, I think the analysis presented by Angry Astronaut needs a review and verification.  The issues are still important, but the numbers might be based on bad premises.

All of his stuff is based on a Tech Crunch article.  I haven't seen that; is it accurate?  Are the power requirements *really* that high?  Surely the desal plant doesn't need to run 24 x 7 x 365; could the water be captured (or mostly captured) and reused?  (If so, I bet it'll need damn good filtering, to avoid damage, but should still lead to more efficiency.)

Most of the questioning seems to focus on the deluge system.  I don't know what kind of issues might crop up with regard to the Fuel.

But in *any* case, I think there's a longer road before we get to orbital flight than we've really considered.

Musk made the comment in the interview with Everyday Astronaut that "Stage 0" was both far more expensive and harder to replace than a Starship.  if you look at the scale of what they are building it's easy to believe- the massive size of the pad and launch equipment as well as the amount of support stuff is staggering

When I first heard talk about catching the booster with the launch tower, I laughed it off as a really good joke.  I could not *conceive* that that could be serious - even with the return landing precision they've already demonstrated for Falcon.  The masses, the speeds, the energies, the piss-your-pants frightening prospect of the scale of the disaster in the event of a miss - *surely* no sane person would propose such a thing!

OK, I admit it.  I was not prepared to Think BIG.

Clearly, they believe they can pull it off.

And if it works, it's a helluva boost for reusability and turnaround time.


Everyone thought that.

then again everyone thought the same about landing a Falcon 9. Then landing on a barge in the middle of the ocean. Then reusing the rocket 10 times.

Everyone thought that Starship would never be able to belly flop then land.

Everyone thought the same thing about landing a car sized robot on Mars by s hovering rocket powered crane and NASA did it twice.

There exist engineers on this planet that routinely do what people think is impossible. Its both awe inspiring and scary.
 
2021-10-21 9:55:39 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: And Delos D. Harriman is *jealous*.


I've always referred to Elon as "DD Harriman, but with Mars"
 
2021-10-21 9:56:44 PM  

khitsicker: Everyone thought that.

then again everyone thought the same about landing a Falcon 9. Then landing on a barge in the middle of the ocean. Then reusing the rocket 10 times.

Everyone thought that Starship would never be able to belly flop then land.

Everyone thought the same thing about landing a car sized robot on Mars by a hovering rocket powered crane and NASA did it twice.

There exist engineers on this planet that routinely do what people think is impossible. Its both awe inspiring and scary.


Amen, brother!

Normally, I count myself in the camp of 'Sure, let's get adventurous and push the envelope!  Go for new horizons!'

But I have reluctantly come to the conclusion that there eventually comes a point when my mind balks at the sheer scale of some of these things.  I have to take a little time to wrap my poor wee mind around it.  And then I'm fine with it.

On the big stuff, I need a little more time to adjust.  And catching the booster triggered it.
 
2021-10-21 10:04:59 PM  

scanman61: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: And Delos D. Harriman is *jealous*.

I've always referred to Elon as "DD Harriman, but with Mars"


Have you ever read Michael Flynn's (no relation) 'Firestar' series?

Four books - Firestar, Rogue Star, Lodestar, Falling Stars.

Basically a D.D. Harriman for our times.  Mariesa Van Huyten, a hideously wealthy young woman, witnesses a meteorite impact at fairly close range.  It scares the shiat out of her, and she devotes her life and her resources to getting some of humanity's eggs into other baskets.  Along the way, she has to build the tools, build the tools to build the tools, and build the tools to build the tools to build the tools - including rebuilding the educational system big time.  Published 1996 through 2001.  Recommended.

I've said that Harriman and Van Huyten had a son, and named him 'Elon'.
 
2021-10-21 10:06:29 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: khitsicker: Everyone thought that.

then again everyone thought the same about landing a Falcon 9. Then landing on a barge in the middle of the ocean. Then reusing the rocket 10 times.

Everyone thought that Starship would never be able to belly flop then land.

Everyone thought the same thing about landing a car sized robot on Mars by a hovering rocket powered crane and NASA did it twice.

There exist engineers on this planet that routinely do what people think is impossible. Its both awe inspiring and scary.

Amen, brother!

Normally, I count myself in the camp of 'Sure, let's get adventurous and push the envelope!  Go for new horizons!'

But I have reluctantly come to the conclusion that there eventually comes a point when my mind balks at the sheer scale of some of these things.  I have to take a little time to wrap my poor wee mind around it.  And then I'm fine with it.

On the big stuff, I need a little more time to adjust.  And catching the booster triggered it.


Definitely. There is always a bit of skepticism but at this point I'm just like "ok send it. we'll see what happens."
 
2021-10-21 10:11:42 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: scanman61: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: And Delos D. Harriman is *jealous*.

I've always referred to Elon as "DD Harriman, but with Mars"

Have you ever read Michael Flynn's (no relation) 'Firestar' series?

Four books - Firestar, Rogue Star, Lodestar, Falling Stars.

Basically a D.D. Harriman for our times.  Mariesa Van Huyten, a hideously wealthy young woman, witnesses a meteorite impact at fairly close range.  It scares the shiat out of her, and she devotes her life and her resources to getting some of humanity's eggs into other baskets.  Along the way, she has to build the tools, build the tools to build the tools, and build the tools to build the tools to build the tools - including rebuilding the educational system big time.  Published 1996 through 2001.  Recommended.

I've said that Harriman and Van Huyten had a son, and named him 'Elon'.


Thank you.  I will find it.
 
2021-10-21 10:11:53 PM  

WelldeadLink: Glockenspiel Hero: Musk made the comment in the interview with Everyday Astronaut that "Stage 0" was both far more expensive and harder to replace than a Starship.  if you look at the scale of what they are building it's easy to believe- the massive size of the pad and launch equipment as well as the amount of support stuff is staggering

[naval-technology.com image 800x600]


I will grant you that a modern US Navy Aircraft Carrier is every bit as awesome in scale as Starship - if not more so - and so is its support chain.

But we don't get an open, front-row look into the design and building of a carrier, as we are privileged to do with Starship.

Starship is the more visceral and captivating prospect because of that.  And that is only increased by the facts that:

a) Carriers don't fly with a thundering roar of fire (SHIELD Helicarriers to the contrary), and

b) Carriers are to a large extent a mature technology.  Starship is something immense that is being done for the first time.

The net effect is that being able to watch the gestation and birthing of Starship is fascinating, in the pure sense of the word.  We have trouble looking away.
 
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