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(Phys Org2)   Of all the flavors in the world? Nah, I'll choose salty   (phys.org) divider line
    More: Obvious, Water, Yi Zheng, natural materials, associate professor, water scarcity, direct approach, team use, Desalination  
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1003 clicks; posted to STEM » on 21 Oct 2021 at 5:05 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



17 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-10-21 5:18:18 PM  
I guess I don't understand how this differs from an old-fashioned solar still?
 
2021-10-21 5:19:19 PM  
Now you're farking with me, right? The author got the means of operating reverse osmosis wrong, and this guy is just sprinkling carbon black on water in a solar distiller. You can build those from plastic bottles already.
 
2021-10-21 5:37:53 PM  
When Zheng took the stinky bucket back to his laboratory, he and his team decided to heat it up to 1,700 degrees Celsius (3,092 degrees Fahrenheit) in order to kill off any bacteria in the manure. Once they'd done that, the researchers found that they had produced a powdered form of carbon. They used that black powder to make a foam, which they turned into a highly absorbent material that floats on the surface of water. When put in sunlight, the water beneath the black material would turn to steam and pass through it.

This is pretty much the only worthwhile paragraph and it boils down to:
"Research team realise cow shiat is a readily available source of carbon"

Zheng had a hunch that that process would be a good desalinator, so he collected some ocean water to test it out. Indeed, when the steam from the salt water that had passed through the manure-based filter condensed back to water, it was remarkably fresh. The resulting water was so fresh, Zheng says, that its sodium concentration was significantly lower than the standards set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for drinking water.

Well, yeah. It's the getting it through the carbon filter in usable quantities that's the hard part. One that isn't addressed.
 
2021-10-21 5:41:14 PM  
I've been trying to carbon filter my sake, shiat is farking hard, I got like 50ml after a day, then the kasu formed a plug and it all stopped.

When I eventually get around to it I'm going to pour it through a nylon bag, then sit the bag with the kasu on some sort of rack in the upper chamber to allow the sake to drain out slowly without the kasu escaping and blocking the filter.

I can't just siphon it as the sake only content is like 30% on top, so I'd be binning half of my sake to avoid the kasu.
 
2021-10-21 5:43:17 PM  
Mythbusters had an episode with Young Scientists with a cow farm that powered themselves like 90% with the methane produced in the cow manure.
 
2021-10-21 6:42:32 PM  
Ugh. I'll have the crab juice
 
2021-10-21 6:43:59 PM  
When Zheng took the stinky bucket back to his laboratory, he and his team decided to heat it up to 1,700 degrees Celsius (3,092 degrees Fahrenheit) in order to kill off any bacteria in the manure.

Wouldn't it be a wee bit expensive to heat up the necessary quantities of manure to that temperature? Three-thousand degrees Fahrenheit is above the melting point of steel.
 
2021-10-21 6:55:20 PM  

Befuddled: When Zheng took the stinky bucket back to his laboratory, he and his team decided to heat it up to 1,700 degrees Celsius (3,092 degrees Fahrenheit) in order to kill off any bacteria in the manure.

Wouldn't it be a wee bit expensive to heat up the necessary quantities of manure to that temperature? Three-thousand degrees Fahrenheit is above the melting point of steel.


It's pretty easy. You just start a campfire, but instead of logs you use steel.
 
2021-10-21 7:14:59 PM  

Cake Hunter: Befuddled: When Zheng took the stinky bucket back to his laboratory, he and his team decided to heat it up to 1,700 degrees Celsius (3,092 degrees Fahrenheit) in order to kill off any bacteria in the manure.

Wouldn't it be a wee bit expensive to heat up the necessary quantities of manure to that temperature? Three-thousand degrees Fahrenheit is above the melting point of steel.

It's pretty easy. You just start a campfire, but instead of logs you use steel.


But where do you get the jet fuel lighter fluid?
 
2021-10-21 7:29:24 PM  

fifthofzen: Cake Hunter: Befuddled: When Zheng took the stinky bucket back to his laboratory, he and his team decided to heat it up to 1,700 degrees Celsius (3,092 degrees Fahrenheit) in order to kill off any bacteria in the manure.

Wouldn't it be a wee bit expensive to heat up the necessary quantities of manure to that temperature? Three-thousand degrees Fahrenheit is above the melting point of steel.

It's pretty easy. You just start a campfire, but instead of logs you use steel.

But where do you get the jet fuel lighter fluid?


You squeeze a flock of lightning bugs, city slicker. Duh.
 
2021-10-21 7:32:18 PM  

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: I guess I don't understand how this differs from an old-fashioned solar still?


The charcoal heats up the water faster because it's black?
 
2021-10-21 8:56:49 PM  

fifthofzen: Cake Hunter: Befuddled: When Zheng took the stinky bucket back to his laboratory, he and his team decided to heat it up to 1,700 degrees Celsius (3,092 degrees Fahrenheit) in order to kill off any bacteria in the manure.

Wouldn't it be a wee bit expensive to heat up the necessary quantities of manure to that temperature? Three-thousand degrees Fahrenheit is above the melting point of steel.

It's pretty easy. You just start a campfire, but instead of logs you use steel.

But where do you get the jet fuel lighter fluid?


um, at the airport?
 
2021-10-21 11:45:54 PM  
All cow manure is, is just digested plant matter. I'd rather step in ANY ruminates offal than a carnivores, plant-based poo is just plant-y where a meat-based poo is ten times as stinky.

That being said, what they ended up with after taking it to 3000 degrees isn't manure anymore and it seems to work.

Do I want to drink water filtered with carbonized manure? Not really but, if it is proven safe and sterile and meets whatever standards the government has we may. IF they can find a way to make big money out it, it will happen.
 
2021-10-22 4:51:40 AM  
If I use rye fed chicken manure will it make bourbon?
At least one water molecule in your morning coffee has passed through a dinosaur and they tell me that every glass of water in most cities will have been drunk by seven other people and a dog or two so the manure part doesn't put me off but there are much lower tech, more easily sustainable solutions to this problem.
 
2021-10-22 6:45:02 AM  

OK So Amuse Me: Do I want to drink water filtered with carbonized manure? Not really but, if it is proven safe and sterile and meets whatever standards the government has we may. IF they can find a way to make big money out it, it will happen.


If it is carbonized I wouldn't worry about whether or not it was sterile. Unless you can carbonize manure under 72 degrees celsius.
 
2021-10-22 7:18:28 AM  
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Worst brownies and Oreos ever.
 
2021-10-22 12:07:18 PM  

leeksfromchichis: MusicMakeMyHeadPound: I guess I don't understand how this differs from an old-fashioned solar still?

The charcoal heats up the water faster because it's black?


Everything is race with you isn't it?

/Bad joke
 
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