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(Guardian)   Either British humor or the absolute epitome of human arrogance summed up in one sentence: "Unique events that led to civilisation mean its demise could 'eliminate meaning in galaxy for ever'"   (theguardian.com) divider line
    More: Dumbass, Earth, Milky Way, Solar System, Galaxy, Planet, Sun, Star, Dark matter  
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269 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 21 Oct 2021 at 1:20 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-10-21 11:32:08 AM  
When did it ever have meaning?
 
2021-10-21 1:24:22 PM  
Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the Western spiral arm of the galaxy lies a small unregarded yellow sun. Orbiting this, at a distance of roughly ninety million miles is an utterly insignificant little blue-green planet, whose ape descended life forms are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea. This planet has, or had, a problem, which was this. Most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small, green pieces of paper, which is odd, because on the whole, it wasn't the small, green pieces of paper which were unhappy. And so the problem remained, and lots of the people were mean, and most of them were miserable, even the ones with digital watches. Many were increasingly of the opinion that they'd all made a big mistake coming down from the trees in the first place, and some said that even the trees had been a bad move, and that no-one should ever have left the oceans.
 
2021-10-21 1:32:44 PM  
It is the height of human arrogance to assume that the universe is under any obligation to make sense to us, or to assume that our existence has any significant meaning on a galactic scale.

You should probably panic anyway, though.
 
2021-10-21 1:45:04 PM  
It's all explained here

i.imgur.comView Full Size
 
2021-10-21 1:48:58 PM  
I hope it doesn't happen, but if it does I hope I get to see the final facial expressions of one of those "eVeRyThiNg hApPeNs fOr a rEaSoN" clowns
 
2021-10-21 2:48:48 PM  
It'd be a dull story, but right now I figure the easiest way Skynet could play the long game and cause humanity to become extinct would be to send a Terminator back through time to set up a social media site...
 
2021-10-21 9:15:07 PM  

Jake Havechek: Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the Western spiral arm of the galaxy lies a small unregarded yellow sun. Orbiting this, at a distance of roughly ninety million miles is an utterly insignificant little blue-green planet, whose ape descended life forms are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea. This planet has, or had, a problem, which was this. Most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small, green pieces of paper, which is odd, because on the whole, it wasn't the small, green pieces of paper which were unhappy. And so the problem remained, and lots of the people were mean, and most of them were miserable, even the ones with digital watches. Many were increasingly of the opinion that they'd all made a big mistake coming down from the trees in the first place, and some said that even the trees had been a bad move, and that no-one should ever have left the oceans.


thanks, doug
 
2021-10-21 9:26:09 PM  

some_beer_drinker: Jake Havechek: Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the Western spiral arm of the galaxy lies a small unregarded yellow sun. Orbiting this, at a distance of roughly ninety million miles is an utterly insignificant little blue-green planet, whose ape descended life forms are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea. This planet has, or had, a problem, which was this. Most of the people living on it were unhappy for pretty much of the time. Many solutions were suggested for this problem, but most of these were largely concerned with the movements of small, green pieces of paper, which is odd, because on the whole, it wasn't the small, green pieces of paper which were unhappy. And so the problem remained, and lots of the people were mean, and most of them were miserable, even the ones with digital watches. Many were increasingly of the opinion that they'd all made a big mistake coming down from the trees in the first place, and some said that even the trees had been a bad move, and that no-one should ever have left the oceans.

thanks, doug


RIP. 😞
 
2021-10-21 10:31:07 PM  
The overwhelming majority (I believe ~90% is the current estimate) have planets. Life has multiple possible seeds and doesn't seem to be exceptionally rare. There is an alternate version of nearly everything in evolution (photosynthesis vs chemosynthesis, highly intelligent birds doing all sorts of things that were thought to require a prefrontal cortex... but bird's brains do it through other structures instead). Life naturally moves towards increasing complexity. There are an insane number of stars.

The chances that this planet is the only one to ever develop life, even if restrict the search to our galaxy, are so utterly minuscule that the possibility is barely worth considering. If humanity wipes itself out, there is almost zero chance that that's the end of civilized life in the galaxy... and about the same chance that it would be the first species to fark up on that scale.
 
2021-10-22 6:51:07 AM  
Sorry, Professor Cox -- nothing will be done because nothing can be done.  I could post the tl/dr version of this (again), but our environmental problems have never been technological in nature.  They've always been a problem of human nature/behavior, and tens of thousands of years of history have shown that's about as likely to change as it is likely to see the sun rise in the west instead of the east.
  
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