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(The Register)   FTP no longer all shiny and Chrome   (theregister.com) divider line
    More: Followup, File Transfer Protocol, Usage share of web browsers, Comparison of web browsers, Web browser, Google Chrome, latest stable build of the Chrome browser, next year, UK's central government procurement agency  
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1441 clicks; posted to STEM » on 21 Oct 2021 at 10:35 AM (31 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-10-21 10:34:34 AM  
7 votes:
FTP from a web browser is a weird way of getting a file.
 
2021-10-21 11:05:00 AM  
7 votes:

downstairs: FTP from a web browser is a weird way of getting a file.


About 100% of web users have a browser and nearly 100% have no idea what a stand-alone FTP client is.
 
2021-10-21 10:59:40 AM  
3 votes:

downstairs: FTP from a web browser is a weird way of getting a file.


It was the beginning of the idea that your browser was the only tool you needed on your computer. It worked because for the majority of people, getting from FTP and downloading via a http link isn't any different.
 
2021-10-21 10:36:25 AM  
2 votes:
Just use Filezilla in SFTP mode. Problem solved.
 
db2
2021-10-21 11:03:14 AM  
2 votes:
Does gopher still work though?
 
2021-10-21 12:12:50 PM  
2 votes:
Protesters of this change expected to number in the 7s.
 
2021-10-21 4:07:00 PM  
2 votes:

downstairs: neilbradley: This is dumb, in the same vein that the concept of forcing all web sites to be HTTPS is dump. The vast majority of the content doesn't actually need encryption.

I agree, though it's become a one-click process to get HTTPS up and running with few hiccups.

I don't quite know why my art sites need encryption, but there ya go, they have it.

You can already still sniff the URL.


I agree with HTTPS everywhere for a couple reasons.

It's easy to add and no knowledge is required by the users:
It's frustrating having to explain when and when not to enter personal info/cc details based on whether it's http or https. It's hard enough getting some people to understand Microsoft.penishouse.com is not Microsoft but penishouse.microsoft.com is. Let alone http:// vs https://

It gives old websites a chance to review their security:
If you're still take credit cards over http, you're probably storing plain text passwords or using sha256 for hashing them.

If the website owner cbf, then they probably couldn't be farked putting good security in in the first place and and their website can slowly disappear.

It's easy for it to just be a default thing you do, if your noob nephew web dev adds it to your art site, then they'll also just default add it to your sister's e-commerce site.
 
2021-10-21 11:07:41 AM  
1 vote:
I was thinking just yesterday about my early 90s Internet usage. I might have browsed with an FTP client more than a web browser.
 
2021-10-21 11:26:49 AM  
1 vote:

db2: Does gopher still work though?


Gopher has been deprecated for a couple years.

Having a web interface to an ftp site wasn't that weird not all that long ago. There is still something to be said for a flat listing of files if that's all you really need.
 
2021-10-21 11:46:35 AM  
1 vote:

likefunbutnot: db2: Does gopher still work though?

Gopher has been deprecated for a couple years.

Having a web interface to an ftp site wasn't that weird not all that long ago. There is still something to be said for a flat listing of files if that's all you really need.


Yeah, but HTTP provides this.  Any web server will have "allow directory listing" in some fashion.

Now FTP has all sorts of important uses for more technical users with more technical needs.

But for the everyday user to get a file... it's weird.  HTTP does everything you need.  For those users.
 
2021-10-21 2:51:11 PM  
1 vote:

downstairs: jaytkay: downstairs: FTP from a web browser is a weird way of getting a file.

About 100% of web users have a browser and nearly 100% have no idea what a stand-alone FTP client is.

What I'm saying is *providing* a file (or files) via HTTP for normal users is weird compared to, you know, HTTP.


It isn't (wasn't) via HTTP. The browser had a built-in FTP client. The address bar would show ftp://whatever.com (not HTTP colon backslash backslash)
 
2021-10-21 3:19:09 PM  
1 vote:

downstairs: jaytkay: downstairs: FTP from a web browser is a weird way of getting a file.

About 100% of web users have a browser and nearly 100% have no idea what a stand-alone FTP client is.


What I'm saying is *providing* a file (or files) via HTTP for normal users is weird compared to, you know, HTTP.


It's not weird at all.  The World Wide Web was designed so that browsers could use any protocol (http, ftp, telnet, many more) to connect to a resource.  The creators were surprised and dismayed to find that most people didn't care about the part before the /: at all.  Only a few people like Don Lancaster predicted that hypertext would dominate the Web landscape.
 
2021-10-21 3:56:45 PM  
1 vote:

neilbradley: This is dumb, in the same vein that the concept of forcing all web sites to be HTTPS is dump. The vast majority of the content doesn't actually need encryption.


I agree, though it's become a one-click process to get HTTPS up and running with few hiccups.

I don't quite know why my art sites need encryption, but there ya go, they have it.

You can already still sniff the URL.
 
2021-10-21 3:59:15 PM  
1 vote:
My only question is 'what happens when a link is ftp?'

HP, IBM and other large hardware companies are notorious for using FTP links for driver and firmware downloads.

Does it offload to the FTP client or pop the Windows unknown file type prompt? Does it try to download using HTTP? Or does it tell the use to go eat a dick?

Better not be the last one.
 
2021-10-21 5:02:16 PM  
1 vote:

downstairs: neilbradley: This is dumb, in the same vein that the concept of forcing all web sites to be HTTPS is dump. The vast majority of the content doesn't actually need encryption.

I agree, though it's become a one-click process to get HTTPS up and running with few hiccups.

I don't quite know why my art sites need encryption, but there ya go, they have it.

You can already still sniff the URL.


One, it prevents ISPs from injecting ads into your web pages, as some ISPs do. That' a farking terrible practice, but considering how terrible most ISPs are, wholly unsurprising.

Second, only the FQDM is transported in plaintext, and even then not always. However, the actual file path is not.

So, if you go to https://www.artmuseum.org/ then yeah, the fact that you are going to www.artmuseum.org is known, but that you viewed 200-ways-to-form-a-union-and-overthrow-the-government-at-the-same-time.html is still secret, so your boss doesn't know you're interested in unionizing, and the government doesn't know you kinda want to overthrow them.
 
2021-10-21 11:23:50 PM  
1 vote:

dyhchong: neilbradley: That's just it - the vast majority of site don't have logins/CC taking, anyway, so it's an unneeded burden to a lot of web sites.

You obviously didn't read my post.

Also I couldn't name a single website with no login function.

Have you an example of one?


Have you forgotten the most important website of all?
 
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