Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Vox)   Scientists say the planet is very likely to still be here in a million years, will probably be inhabited by dog-sized praying mantises and swimming whale-rats. Us humans not so much   (vox.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Evolution, human activity, Extinction, evolutionary biologists, animals of the future, alive today, Liz Alter, harsher world  
•       •       •

623 clicks; posted to STEM » on 20 Oct 2021 at 11:04 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



41 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-10-20 5:19:49 PM  
Don't count out our capacity for complete planetary destruction.
 
2021-10-20 5:53:20 PM  

aleister_greynight: Don't count out our capacity for complete planetary destruction.


Difficulty: to reach that ability, we would have to significantly increase our technological capacity, which would require surviving for additional millennia, which would require solving the ecological disasters we have created thus far.
 
2021-10-20 5:56:41 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-10-20 6:12:09 PM  

Algebrat: aleister_greynight: Don't count out our capacity for complete planetary destruction.

Difficulty: to reach that ability, we would have to significantly increase our technological capacity, which would require surviving for additional millennia, which would require solving the ecological disasters we have created thus far.


You're a real buzzkill.  Have some faith.  We'll get there.
 
2021-10-20 8:36:47 PM  
I legitimately don't see the planet creating superbugs in the air for dozens of millions of years.
 
2021-10-20 8:50:32 PM  

puffy999: I legitimately don't see the planet creating superbugs in the air for dozens of millions of years.


Fark user imageView Full Size

Life, uh, finds a way.
 
2021-10-20 9:38:17 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-10-20 10:10:59 PM  
I'm too lazy to Google it but somewhere I read that the only non-vegitive life left could be jellyfish.
 
2021-10-20 11:09:03 PM  
Anything But Us - Soon As Possible

/die. we should all just die
 
2021-10-20 11:12:50 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

Meanwhile, Tardigrades gonna go on tardigrading.
 
2021-10-20 11:15:29 PM  

pheelix: [Fark user image image 778x519]
Meanwhile, Tardigrades gonna go on tardigrading.


Function over fashion.

Function over all.
 
2021-10-20 11:17:06 PM  

puffy999: I legitimately don't see the planet creating superbugs in the air for dozens of millions of years.


Exactly.

Bugs don't have lungs, they basically transport oxygen throughout their bodies through a series of small vents and tubes.

The larger the body, the higher their total need for oxygen. Body mass increases exponentially in relation to their overall length.

There isn't enough oxygen in the atmosphere for any insect larger than a foot or so to survive. Even if oxygen doubles over a few million years, that buys you a few inches at
best - they aren't going to evolve something like lungs over that short of a timeframe.
 
2021-10-20 11:21:02 PM  

steklo: [Fark user image image 850x560]


X(the amount of Bullshiat You're Willing to Buy From Drake)
 
2021-10-20 11:21:35 PM  

Excelsior: puffy999: I legitimately don't see the planet creating superbugs in the air for dozens of millions of years.

Exactly.

Bugs don't have lungs, they basically transport oxygen throughout their bodies through a series of small vents and tubes.

The larger the body, the higher their total need for oxygen. Body mass increases exponentially in relation to their overall length.

There isn't enough oxygen in the atmosphere for any insect larger than a foot or so to survive. Even if oxygen doubles over a few million years, that buys you a few inches at
best - they aren't going to evolve something like lungs over that short of a timeframe.


Their thought is super-accelerated O2 levels as a response to CO2 levels and plant life going crazy...

But I have a hard time seeing evolution working so quickly. Because if anything the massive CO2 rise would create its own extinction event
 
2021-10-20 11:32:24 PM  

Algebrat: aleister_greynight: Don't count out our capacity for complete planetary destruction.

Difficulty: to reach that ability, we would have to significantly increase our technological capacity, which would require surviving for additional millennia, which would require solving the ecological disasters we have created thus far.


We'd gain the ability to destroy planets long before we reach type 2. We need to figure out a way to get enough mass on an intercept orbit. Once we do that, we're golden. Something the size of Vesta.
 
2021-10-20 11:36:48 PM  

puffy999: Excelsior: puffy999: I legitimately don't see the planet creating superbugs in the air for dozens of millions of years.

Exactly.

Bugs don't have lungs, they basically transport oxygen throughout their bodies through a series of small vents and tubes.

The larger the body, the higher their total need for oxygen. Body mass increases exponentially in relation to their overall length.

There isn't enough oxygen in the atmosphere for any insect larger than a foot or so to survive. Even if oxygen doubles over a few million years, that buys you a few inches at
best - they aren't going to evolve something like lungs over that short of a timeframe.

Their thought is super-accelerated O2 levels as a response to CO2 levels and plant life going crazy...

But I have a hard time seeing evolution working so quickly. Because if anything the massive CO2 rise would create its own extinction event


Atmospheric pressure was a fair bit higher back then as well. We've lost a lot of atmosphere since the Carboniferous.
 
2021-10-20 11:39:33 PM  

RedVentrue: puffy999: Excelsior: puffy999: I legitimately don't see the planet creating superbugs in the air for dozens of millions of years.

Exactly.

Bugs don't have lungs, they basically transport oxygen throughout their bodies through a series of small vents and tubes.

The larger the body, the higher their total need for oxygen. Body mass increases exponentially in relation to their overall length.

There isn't enough oxygen in the atmosphere for any insect larger than a foot or so to survive. Even if oxygen doubles over a few million years, that buys you a few inches at
best - they aren't going to evolve something like lungs over that short of a timeframe.

Their thought is super-accelerated O2 levels as a response to CO2 levels and plant life going crazy...

But I have a hard time seeing evolution working so quickly. Because if anything the massive CO2 rise would create its own extinction event

Atmospheric pressure was a fair bit higher back then as well. We've lost a lot of atmosphere since the Carboniferous.


Stupid Mars. Teaching us about our past by example.
 
2021-10-20 11:48:07 PM  
Even without climate change, would Homo sapians still be around in a million years? Would the species stay stagnant and not evolve?  Is H. sapians destine to extinction or stagnation and there is no possible future in which it evolves into another species?
 
2021-10-20 11:56:32 PM  

steklo: [Fark user image 850x560]


This is still fun to talk, but it's at such a hand-waving level you have to be drunk to even banter it around.

It's a talking point for opening someone's mind up to thinking bigger, and broader.  But it won't get you anywhere with an actual number.

Anyone who's actually worked on it seems to either be overconfident and so sure of themselves you can't trust them at all (which is how you get funding, unfortuntely).  Or they are ACTUALLY aware of what it would take to pin those numbers down, and realize that's not happening for hundreds or thousands of years, and so they aren't worrying too much about it beyond their paycheck and the fun-factor of trying to hail-mary those numbers.
 
2021-10-21 12:06:50 AM  

aleister_greynight: Don't count out our capacity for complete planetary destruction.


Short of literally cracking the Earth into pieces that drift apart until they smash into eachother and form a debris ring around the sun, there's nothing we can do that will end all life on Earth.

The issue has always been, and it remains, how long we can keep the Earth habitable for humans. But life on Earth is going to be just fine.
 
2021-10-21 12:38:10 AM  
True, but in 10 Million Years the Cuttlefish will be running things pretty smoothly.
 
2021-10-21 12:59:10 AM  

emtwo: aleister_greynight: Don't count out our capacity for complete planetary destruction.

Short of literally cracking the Earth into pieces that drift apart until they smash into eachother and form a debris ring around the sun, there's nothing we can do that will end all life on Earth.

The issue has always been, and it remains, how long we can keep the Earth habitable for humans. But life on Earth is going to be just fine.


Don't have to go that far.  Total crustal liquefaction would be enough.  Like an impact from something between the sizes of the Moon and Mars or so.  Maybe something even smaller, like Ceres, could do it.  Would peel the Earth like an apple and turn everything molten again, and nothing could survive that.
 
2021-10-21 1:41:07 AM  
In a million years, man will have an exoskeleton, antennae, horns, extra eyes and an internal penis. The women will fly and cull men for food. All people will be called Ed and there will be no other animals.
 
2021-10-21 2:27:05 AM  
Liberals love their doom & gloom porn.
 
2021-10-21 4:35:45 AM  

pheelix: [Fark user image 778x519]
Meanwhile, Tardigrades gonna go on tardigrading.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-10-21 6:48:48 AM  
Yesterday I was looking at my bee hives and on one of them there was a praying mantis, hanging upside down directly above the hive entrance, waiting to grab a meal.
 
2021-10-21 9:17:23 AM  

garron: Liberals love their doom & gloom porn.


Don't you have a migrant caravan to screech about?
 
2021-10-21 9:56:20 AM  

AmbassadorBooze: Even without climate change, would Homo sapians still be around in a million years? Would the species stay stagnant and not evolve? Is H. sapians destine to extinction or stagnation and there is no possible future in which it evolves into another species?


Evolution never stops.  There's a popular misperception that since modern civilization has protected us from predation and cured many diseases, that human evolution has somehow stopped, but that's ridiculous.  Evolution is just genetic change over time, driven by many factors (natural selection being just one) and there's no stopping change.

Even if our descendants are still around millions of years from now, they will likely be as different from us as our hominid ancestors millions of years ago are.
 
2021-10-21 1:14:10 PM  

Doc Daneeka: AmbassadorBooze: Even without climate change, would Homo sapians still be around in a million years? Would the species stay stagnant and not evolve? Is H. sapians destine to extinction or stagnation and there is no possible future in which it evolves into another species?

Evolution never stops.  There's a popular misperception that since modern civilization has protected us from predation and cured many diseases, that human evolution has somehow stopped, but that's ridiculous.  Evolution is just genetic change over time, driven by many factors (natural selection being just one) and there's no stopping change.

Even if our descendants are still around millions of years from now, they will likely be as different from us as our hominid ancestors millions of years ago are.


So, even in the best case scenario where we get majik or alien tech to solve climate crisis tomorrow, we will still be extinct, since a new species will replace us.
 
2021-10-21 3:58:45 PM  

AmbassadorBooze: Doc Daneeka: AmbassadorBooze: Even without climate change, would Homo sapians still be around in a million years? Would the species stay stagnant and not evolve? Is H. sapians destine to extinction or stagnation and there is no possible future in which it evolves into another species?

Evolution never stops.  There's a popular misperception that since modern civilization has protected us from predation and cured many diseases, that human evolution has somehow stopped, but that's ridiculous.  Evolution is just genetic change over time, driven by many factors (natural selection being just one) and there's no stopping change.

Even if our descendants are still around millions of years from now, they will likely be as different from us as our hominid ancestors millions of years ago are.

So, even in the best case scenario where we get majik or alien tech to solve climate crisis tomorrow, we will still be extinct, since a new species will replace us.


I wouldn't say extinct, but it depends on how you define extinct. We carry at least 5 species of human in our DNA right now, so you could say that those species are not extinct.
 
2021-10-21 4:00:04 PM  
We are all the descendants of various speciated versions of H. Erectus.
 
2021-10-21 4:14:44 PM  

RedVentrue: AmbassadorBooze: Doc Daneeka: AmbassadorBooze: Even without climate change, would Homo sapians still be around in a million years? Would the species stay stagnant and not evolve? Is H. sapians destine to extinction or stagnation and there is no possible future in which it evolves into another species?

Evolution never stops.  There's a popular misperception that since modern civilization has protected us from predation and cured many diseases, that human evolution has somehow stopped, but that's ridiculous.  Evolution is just genetic change over time, driven by many factors (natural selection being just one) and there's no stopping change.

Even if our descendants are still around millions of years from now, they will likely be as different from us as our hominid ancestors millions of years ago are.

So, even in the best case scenario where we get majik or alien tech to solve climate crisis tomorrow, we will still be extinct, since a new species will replace us.

I wouldn't say extinct, but it depends on how you define extinct. We carry at least 5 species of human in our DNA right now, so you could say that those species are not extinct.


So since the small rat thing that is the progenitor to all primates is in our DNA, that rat like thing is not extinct?  Velocirapors are not extinct since avian dinosaurs are still alive?  That everything on earth is basically the same proto bacteria like membrane and rna soup, since all life descends from that first abiogenically derived life?

Or will H. sapians go extinct some time in million years, no matter what happens, either due to climate change or supernovae, or due to speciation?
 
2021-10-21 5:19:52 PM  

AmbassadorBooze: RedVentrue: AmbassadorBooze: Doc Daneeka: AmbassadorBooze: Even without climate change, would Homo sapians still be around in a million years? Would the species stay stagnant and not evolve? Is H. sapians destine to extinction or stagnation and there is no possible future in which it evolves into another species?

Evolution never stops.  There's a popular misperception that since modern civilization has protected us from predation and cured many diseases, that human evolution has somehow stopped, but that's ridiculous.  Evolution is just genetic change over time, driven by many factors (natural selection being just one) and there's no stopping change.

Even if our descendants are still around millions of years from now, they will likely be as different from us as our hominid ancestors millions of years ago are.

So, even in the best case scenario where we get majik or alien tech to solve climate crisis tomorrow, we will still be extinct, since a new species will replace us.

I wouldn't say extinct, but it depends on how you define extinct. We carry at least 5 species of human in our DNA right now, so you could say that those species are not extinct.

So since the small rat thing that is the progenitor to all primates is in our DNA, that rat like thing is not extinct?  Velocirapors are not extinct since avian dinosaurs are still alive?  That everything on earth is basically the same proto bacteria like membrane and rna soup, since all life descends from that first abiogenically derived life?

Or will H. sapians go extinct some time in million years, no matter what happens, either due to climate change or supernovae, or due to speciation?


Kind of. I see evolution as a continuous chain going all the way back to the beginning. We are all of those things that contributed to making us what we are today, and the drives and behaviors they had still affect us today. Eventually H. Sapiens Sapiens will not exist as a distinct species, but if we survive long enough, will contribute to what we become. Secondly we don't suddenly become something else by natural selection as that's a gradual process occurring over many generations. We will not be H. Sapiens Sapiens, but H. Sapiens Sapiens will be a part of us. Of course modern technology has thrown a monkey wrench in the whole works. Who knows what will happen?
 
2021-10-21 6:17:51 PM  

RedVentrue: AmbassadorBooze: RedVentrue: AmbassadorBooze: Doc Daneeka: AmbassadorBooze: Even without climate change, would Homo sapians still be around in a million years? Would the species stay stagnant and not evolve? Is H. sapians destine to extinction or stagnation and there is no possible future in which it evolves into another species?

Evolution never stops.  There's a popular misperception that since modern civilization has protected us from predation and cured many diseases, that human evolution has somehow stopped, but that's ridiculous.  Evolution is just genetic change over time, driven by many factors (natural selection being just one) and there's no stopping change.

Even if our descendants are still around millions of years from now, they will likely be as different from us as our hominid ancestors millions of years ago are.

So, even in the best case scenario where we get majik or alien tech to solve climate crisis tomorrow, we will still be extinct, since a new species will replace us.

I wouldn't say extinct, but it depends on how you define extinct. We carry at least 5 species of human in our DNA right now, so you could say that those species are not extinct.

So since the small rat thing that is the progenitor to all primates is in our DNA, that rat like thing is not extinct?  Velocirapors are not extinct since avian dinosaurs are still alive?  That everything on earth is basically the same proto bacteria like membrane and rna soup, since all life descends from that first abiogenically derived life?

Or will H. sapians go extinct some time in million years, no matter what happens, either due to climate change or supernovae, or due to speciation?

Kind of. I see evolution as a continuous chain going all the way back to the beginning. We are all of those things that contributed to making us what we are today, and the drives and behaviors they had still affect us today. Eventually H. Sapiens Sapiens will not exist as a distinct species, but if we survive long e ...


Sure, it all depends on definitions.  But is there anybody that defines current H. sapians as H. sapians erectus neaderthalensis..... rat monkey thing..... RNA bag?

A species is a thing, sure, with grey imprecise edges, but is H. Sapians the same species as rat monkey thing a 200 million years ago?
 
2021-10-21 7:30:06 PM  

AmbassadorBooze: RedVentrue: AmbassadorBooze: RedVentrue: AmbassadorBooze: Doc Daneeka: AmbassadorBooze: Even without climate change, would Homo sapians still be around in a million years? Would the species stay stagnant and not evolve? Is H. sapians destine to extinction or stagnation and there is no possible future in which it evolves into another species?

Evolution never stops.  There's a popular misperception that since modern civilization has protected us from predation and cured many diseases, that human evolution has somehow stopped, but that's ridiculous.  Evolution is just genetic change over time, driven by many factors (natural selection being just one) and there's no stopping change.

Even if our descendants are still around millions of years from now, they will likely be as different from us as our hominid ancestors millions of years ago are.

So, even in the best case scenario where we get majik or alien tech to solve climate crisis tomorrow, we will still be extinct, since a new species will replace us.

I wouldn't say extinct, but it depends on how you define extinct. We carry at least 5 species of human in our DNA right now, so you could say that those species are not extinct.

So since the small rat thing that is the progenitor to all primates is in our DNA, that rat like thing is not extinct?  Velocirapors are not extinct since avian dinosaurs are still alive?  That everything on earth is basically the same proto bacteria like membrane and rna soup, since all life descends from that first abiogenically derived life?

Or will H. sapians go extinct some time in million years, no matter what happens, either due to climate change or supernovae, or due to speciation?

Kind of. I see evolution as a continuous chain going all the way back to the beginning. We are all of those things that contributed to making us what we are today, and the drives and behaviors they had still affect us today. Eventually H. Sapiens Sapiens will not exist as a distinct species, but if we su ...


What would you be without the rat monkey thing from 200 million years ago? Cut that part out of your inherited DNA and would you still be you, or even human? This is my own personal interpretation, not a scientifically accepted theory.
 
2021-10-21 7:42:54 PM  

RedVentrue: AmbassadorBooze: RedVentrue: AmbassadorBooze: RedVentrue: AmbassadorBooze: Doc Daneeka: AmbassadorBooze: Even without climate change, would Homo sapians still be around in a million years? Would the species stay stagnant and not evolve? Is H. sapians destine to extinction or stagnation and there is no possible future in which it evolves into another species?

Evolution never stops.  There's a popular misperception that since modern civilization has protected us from predation and cured many diseases, that human evolution has somehow stopped, but that's ridiculous.  Evolution is just genetic change over time, driven by many factors (natural selection being just one) and there's no stopping change.

Even if our descendants are still around millions of years from now, they will likely be as different from us as our hominid ancestors millions of years ago are.

So, even in the best case scenario where we get majik or alien tech to solve climate crisis tomorrow, we will still be extinct, since a new species will replace us.

I wouldn't say extinct, but it depends on how you define extinct. We carry at least 5 species of human in our DNA right now, so you could say that those species are not extinct.

So since the small rat thing that is the progenitor to all primates is in our DNA, that rat like thing is not extinct?  Velocirapors are not extinct since avian dinosaurs are still alive?  That everything on earth is basically the same proto bacteria like membrane and rna soup, since all life descends from that first abiogenically derived life?

Or will H. sapians go extinct some time in million years, no matter what happens, either due to climate change or supernovae, or due to speciation?

Kind of. I see evolution as a continuous chain going all the way back to the beginning. We are all of those things that contributed to making us what we are today, and the drives and behaviors they had still affect us today. Eventually H. Sapiens Sapiens will not exist as a distinct spec ...


Of course I wouldn't be me without the rat monkey thing.  Just as I would not be me if my jizz bearing parent didn't jizz in my birthing person.  But that doesn't make me my own birthing person.  We have to draw the line somewhere.  Otherwise we (all life) are a single life.  Yes, it makes a good instagram post, but does it make it true.  We follow the science here, so we need to know what science says.  Are we indivduals, or are we all a single hive organism?
 
2021-10-21 7:46:00 PM  
And to continue, if we as humxn (sapians or some offshoot) create artifcial life, capable of all the things living things are, but are made of metal and positronic brains, are the mandroids the same species as H. sapians?  And if so, are cars and hammers and vibrators the same species as H. sapians?  We created them, and they are the progenitors to the mandroids.  So if mandroids are humans then hammers are humans.
 
2021-10-21 7:46:34 PM  
Or is taxonomy a joke?
 
2021-10-21 7:53:10 PM  
RedVentrue:

And please don't take this as an attack.  I truly do love the topic of speication and taxonomy and classification of things, and where we draw the line.

Clearly you are a lumper.  That is fine. that is in vogue right now.  In 20 years, the splitters will be in style, and in 40 years, the lumpers.... as it always has been.
 
2021-10-21 8:46:16 PM  

AmbassadorBooze: We have to draw the line somewhere.


There is no line, only a gradient from one end to the other. Why draw artificial lines where there are none?

AmbassadorBooze: And to continue, if we as humxn (sapians or some offshoot) create artifcial life, capable of all the things living things are, but are made of metal and positronic brains, are the mandroids the same species as H. sapians?  And if so, are cars and hammers and vibrators the same species as H. sapians?  We created them, and they are the progenitors to the mandroids.  So if mandroids are humans then hammers are humans.


They don't carry our biological heritage. Maybe ideological step children of our minds and creativity.

AmbassadorBooze: RedVentrue:

And please don't take this as an attack.  I truly do love the topic of speication and taxonomy and classification of things, and where we draw the line.

Clearly you are a lumper.  That is fine. that is in vogue right now.  In 20 years, the splitters will be in style, and in 40 years, the lumpers.... as it always has been.


I find the subject endlessly fascinating.

Here's a scenario to think about. We know that we are the product of Sapiens, Neanderthals, Denisovans, and possibly others unidentified. What happens if one were to take an Asian and remove the Denisovan? They become European. Remove the Neanderthal, and they become sub-Saharan African. We are all hybridized people, but we're still people. Going farther back in time would have more drastic changes. Something to consider.
 
2021-10-21 8:53:28 PM  

AmbassadorBooze: RedVentrue: AmbassadorBooze: Doc Daneeka: AmbassadorBooze: Even without climate change, would Homo sapians still be around in a million years? Would the species stay stagnant and not evolve? Is H. sapians destine to extinction or stagnation and there is no possible future in which it evolves into another species?

Evolution never stops.  There's a popular misperception that since modern civilization has protected us from predation and cured many diseases, that human evolution has somehow stopped, but that's ridiculous.  Evolution is just genetic change over time, driven by many factors (natural selection being just one) and there's no stopping change.

Even if our descendants are still around millions of years from now, they will likely be as different from us as our hominid ancestors millions of years ago are.

So, even in the best case scenario where we get majik or alien tech to solve climate crisis tomorrow, we will still be extinct, since a new species will replace us.

I wouldn't say extinct, but it depends on how you define extinct. We carry at least 5 species of human in our DNA right now, so you could say that those species are not extinct.

So since the small rat thing that is the progenitor to all primates is in our DNA, that rat like thing is not extinct?  Velocirapors are not extinct since avian dinosaurs are still alive?  That everything on earth is basically the same proto bacteria like membrane and rna soup, since all life descends from that first abiogenically derived life?

Or will H. sapians go extinct some time in million years, no matter what happens, either due to climate change or supernovae, or due to speciation?


They told us that
We lost our tails
Evolving up
From little snails
I say that's all
Just wind in sails
Are we not men?
We are DEVO
 
Displayed 41 of 41 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.