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(Phys Org2)   Was "Family Circus" decades ahead of Big Data? Ida Know   (phys.org) divider line
    More: Obvious, Human, Psychology, Thought, Shortest path problem, human behavior, fellow classmates, Humans, City  
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1247 clicks; posted to STEM » on 19 Oct 2021 at 9:01 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



17 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-10-19 9:04:04 AM  
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2021-10-19 9:26:02 AM  
Sure, walking along the drainage canal and down the service road by the industrial district is a lot shorter, but I think I'll take the path through the park that goes past the little coffee shops I like.
 
2021-10-19 9:26:35 AM  
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2021-10-19 9:30:38 AM  
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2021-10-19 9:36:52 AM  
I feel like this is "water makes things wet* "  type of science. Optimal pathing and shortcut finding have been big business for centuries. It's been known that people are suboptimal navigators - we prefer a confident path over a quick one.

Cool that there's empirical data though.

*oddly enough, water itself is not wet
 
2021-10-19 9:37:31 AM  
So people who go out their way to get a morning coffee might also do the same for an evening drink at a pub? Shocking.
 
2021-10-19 9:47:45 AM  
When planning a route manually (like commuting to a new work location), my method is to stretch a string between the two points, then pick the roads on the map that run closest to the string (least cumulative offset from the crow-flies route).

It doesn't take into account: road quality, road speed limit, number of turns, number of stops...and probably a whole lot of other weighting factors, but it does give me a starting point. As I commute, I try different variations, and eventually settle down to a route I like.

Now, of course, I just punch the destination into my Garmin, and try not to drive off any cliffs.
 
2021-10-19 10:24:06 AM  

Flowery Twats: it doesn't take into account: road quality, road speed limit, number of turns, number of stops...and probably a whole lot of other weighting factors, but it does give me a starting point. As I commute, I try different variations, and eventually settle down to a route I like.


I used to drive all over for work and found that's one of the flaws with Google Maps - it doesn't factor in speeding.  Many people driving a long distance will set the cruise control at 9 miles an hour above the speed limit and zone out.  The percentage that this speed is above the posted speed limit that Google uses is higher for roads with lower speed limits.  So, if times are comparable between two routes on Google Maps, and one has a lower average speed limit, then that route will be faster in reality.


I found this especially true for trips involving I-75 in Florida.
 
2021-10-19 10:31:30 AM  
when i was commuting every day i had a choice of 2 highways for the main part of the drive.
one was ~5 mins longer than the second.  IF i could drive both at 70-85mph.  (speed limit on both was 60)

the shorter one was modernized and had big wide shoulders, wide on/off ramps, and about once a month...cops setting speed traps EVERYWHERE
the longer one was an older original interstate that was bounded by the city and narrow as hell.  zero shoulder anywhere.  the only way to pull anyone over was to close a lane.  cops hated that road and you never saw one on it.

i got 2 tickets in 3 years following my GPS directions to take the first and then switched and never had a problem in 7 years after that on the other.
 
2021-10-19 11:01:05 AM  
3.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size

No one would ever go out of their way after eating a piece of pie at the diner, especially on a hot night.
 
2021-10-19 11:13:19 AM  

Easy Reader: Sure, walking along the drainage canal and down the service road by the industrial district is a lot shorter, but I think I'll take the path through the park that goes past the little coffee shops I like.


That's part of it - our brains take into account a lot more than just optimal pathing and distance-to-time ratios. We may find some paths more aesthetically pleasing, or more risk-averse. We may change our pathing based on perceived or actual time, or on factors that have nothing to do with the trip itself. What one person finds interesting, safe, fun, or diverting, another person may not.

For example, I'm a "road less traveled" kind of person - I don't like crowds, and I'm not fond of being around people any more, so I tend towards quieter, less-traveled routes. Before COVID, I was fond of long walks with places to sit over short walks with no stops.

Now, it's all moot - I don't go anywhere, so my pathing is always optimal.
 
2021-10-19 11:19:17 AM  

Flowery Twats: When planning a route manually (like commuting to a new work location), my method is to stretch a string between the two points, then pick the roads on the map that run closest to the string (least cumulative offset from the crow-flies route).

It doesn't take into account: road quality, road speed limit, number of turns, number of stops...and probably a whole lot of other weighting factors, but it does give me a starting point. As I commute, I try different variations, and eventually settle down to a route I like.

Now, of course, I just punch the destination into my Garmin, and try not to drive off any cliffs.


I pick my path by the one that has the fewest left turns, and will go out of my way to avoid turning left without a light.

If I could never make a left turn again, that would be great.  They add so much time to a trip.
 
2021-10-19 11:49:39 AM  
Well, it's either take the highway at 60mph, or wander around in a maze of forests and farms at 40, if I don't get behind a tractor.
 
2021-10-19 11:51:25 AM  

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: I feel like this is "water makes things wet* "  type of science. Optimal pathing and shortcut finding have been big business for centuries. It's been known that people are suboptimal navigators - we prefer a confident path over a quick one.

Cool that there's empirical data though.

*oddly enough, water itself is not wet


If you only look at answer 1. If you look at answer 2 it is wet.

/I bet the idea that water is wet pre-dates the definition that says wetness is an attribute of a liquid that adheres to a solid
 
2021-10-19 11:57:59 AM  

DerAppie: MusicMakeMyHeadPound: I feel like this is "water makes things wet* "  type of science. Optimal pathing and shortcut finding have been big business for centuries. It's been known that people are suboptimal navigators - we prefer a confident path over a quick one.

Cool that there's empirical data though.

*oddly enough, water itself is not wet

If you only look at answer 1. If you look at answer 2 it is wet.

/I bet the idea that water is wet pre-dates the definition that says wetness is an attribute of a liquid that adheres to a solid


You're not wrong. However, a rebuttal: 

Stench Blossoms, Crap Weed and ScumDrops
Youtube XUKl37Z-ULM
 
2021-10-19 2:34:52 PM  
Sounds dangerous.

Big Data - "Dangerous (feat. Joywave)" [Official Music Video]
Youtube E8b4xYbEugo
 
2021-10-19 4:03:55 PM  
I wonder if sailboat owners incorporate a lot of unnecessary tacking.
 
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