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(Fark)   Mary, Mary, quite contrary, how does your garden grow? Tell us all about it in your Fark Gardening Thread for Tuesday October 19, 2021   (fark.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy  
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391 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Oct 2021 at 7:00 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-10-18 8:17:47 PM  
we're weeellll into autumn here now, but I was so happy with my gladioli this summer

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2021-10-18 8:19:33 PM  
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2021-10-18 8:20:56 PM  
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2021-10-18 10:47:41 PM  
Just started the process of cutting back the ivy , coneflowers, and other Miscellaneous flowers in the garden. Surprised that my marigold seeds I got from dollar tree are still holding up and somehow spread to my driveway.
 
2021-10-18 10:58:51 PM  
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2021-10-18 11:00:12 PM  
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2021-10-18 11:40:12 PM  
My camera sucks... But those things in the background (with a pod on the end of each stem) started growing this year in a relative's garden and we don't know what they are. Any help would be appreciated

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2021-10-19 12:06:07 AM  

puffy999: My camera sucks... But those things in the background (with a pod on the end of each stem) started growing this year in a relative's garden and we don't know what they are. Any help would be appreciated

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Looks like a nigella possibly wild fennel.
 
2021-10-19 12:19:00 AM  

alechemist: puffy999: My camera sucks... But those things in the background (with a pod on the end of each stem) started growing this year in a relative's garden and we don't know what they are. Any help would be appreciated

[Fark user image image 850x1133]

Looks like a nigella possibly wild fennel.


That appears to be the answer.

They may have been around before but apparently that area was always a deer grazing spot before they planted a big pumpkin plant.

Thanks!
 
2021-10-19 12:19:40 AM  
No flowers apparently appeared, it was just those pods, so... Hmmm..
 
2021-10-19 3:32:56 AM  

puffy999: No flowers apparently appeared, it was just those pods, so... Hmmm..


My bad, they were just not described. But nothing was observed to determine the flower appearance.

So basically it's a case of "leave it until next year" because it's an ornamental at worst.
 
2021-10-19 5:34:23 AM  
It's pretty much cleanup for winter time here. Which my mom came over and helped me with yesterday. Annual containers were emptied, perennials cut back, etc. I am very sore.

Except the torenia. That stuff is still flowering and doing great even though I've been totally neglecting it for close to a month. I'm going to let it keep doing its thing for as long as it can. (have been hit pretty hard by a depression/lack of executive function/ADHD problem for a few weeks, I'm trying to get out of it)
 
2021-10-19 7:01:57 AM  
I tried gardening once but the Appalachian Drug Task Force hauled half my pots down out of the trees and slapped me with 43 felonies. Gardening, never again.
 
2021-10-19 7:06:15 AM  
It's down in the low 40s at night this week. My red ghost pepper plant is still hanging in there for it's last harvest, though. About 30-40 peppers on the plant, half of them full sized, just waiting to ripen.
 
2021-10-19 7:07:55 AM  
I need to clear out lots of weeds, till, and plant about 300 bulbs before the freeze.
 
2021-10-19 7:15:17 AM  
Entonces, with frost expected this coming weekend my San Marzanos are done. Going to remove them from the soil later today. They were VERY successful, will repeat next year, only with better support cages.

Only thing left in the ground is waaaay too much kale, and a lonely squash. Out they come today too.

/habaneros and cayennes will also be repeated.
 
2021-10-19 7:17:28 AM  
Have a couple of Cherokee Purple tomatoes left on the vine and maybe one German Queen.  I lost a dozen of them to end rot (but none on my other plants).
 
2021-10-19 7:23:08 AM  
My kittens turned into cats and laid all over my plants, I'm nursing a bunch of japanese iris and have lost a few fancy amaryllis... the sweetest one seems determined to smash my agapanthes, kicked rocks out of my Frangipani to pee/poop and now crushing daylillys, I mean literally right NOW... I gotta go turn the hose on 'em.
 
2021-10-19 7:28:07 AM  

puffy999: No flowers apparently appeared, it was just those pods, so... Hmmm..


not wild fennel....I'm overrun with the stuff each year, and it isn't that. Wild fennel hits 2 metres easily. never seen those pods on it.
 
2021-10-19 7:28:22 AM  
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Harvested the last bit of my first crop. Now they hang to dry for a week, followed by more trimming, and then more drying.
 
2021-10-19 7:33:58 AM  

omg bbq: [Fark user image image 425x318]
Harvested the last bit of my first crop. Now they hang to dry for a week, followed by more trimming, and then more drying.


Yummy stuff!
 
2021-10-19 7:39:22 AM  

deadromanoff: omg bbq: [Fark user image image 425x318]
Harvested the last bit of my first crop. Now they hang to dry for a week, followed by more trimming, and then more drying.

Yummy stuff!


Thanks! My first time doing outdoor growing. I have a tent and light for indoor stuff.
I more or less set things up on an auto-watering schedule and neglected it, kinda to see what I'd have for yield as space was not at a premium.  Indoor it's all about trimming and making a green carpet and bla bla bla.  This was just "let's see how much of a weed you really are" and I was impressed.
Only thing I'm not used to with outdoor is bugs. I'm not too grossed out but still bugs are bugs.  Most don't even get near the buds because they are too sticky so proper trimming will mitigate most of those. That said I smoke cigars now and then and they have cigar beetle eggs in them so bugs are just gonna have to be present I guess.

That said I'm kinda excited to carefully cultivate an indoor plant this winter and have it perfect before I shift the light and make it go into overdrive.
 
2021-10-19 7:40:19 AM  
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2021-10-19 7:42:30 AM  
late ripening chilies, first growth oranges, last of the grapes

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2021-10-19 7:45:56 AM  
Everything froze to death weeks ago.

/Canada
 
2021-10-19 8:00:44 AM  
It's called an abutilon or flowering maple. Cool ass flowers.

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2021-10-19 8:04:12 AM  
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2021-10-19 8:05:26 AM  

omg bbq: deadromanoff: omg bbq: [Fark user image image 425x318]
Harvested the last bit of my first crop. Now they hang to dry for a week, followed by more trimming, and then more drying.

Yummy stuff!

Thanks! My first time doing outdoor growing. I have a tent and light for indoor stuff.
I more or less set things up on an auto-watering schedule and neglected it, kinda to see what I'd have for yield as space was not at a premium.  Indoor it's all about trimming and making a green carpet and bla bla bla.  This was just "let's see how much of a weed you really are" and I was impressed.
Only thing I'm not used to with outdoor is bugs. I'm not too grossed out but still bugs are bugs.  Most don't even get near the buds because they are too sticky so proper trimming will mitigate most of those. That said I smoke cigars now and then and they have cigar beetle eggs in them so bugs are just gonna have to be present I guess.

That said I'm kinda excited to carefully cultivate an indoor plant this winter and have it perfect before I shift the light and make it go into overdrive.


Planting things in the allium family(onions, garlic etc) nearby might prevent some of the pests. Marigolds too.
 
2021-10-19 8:12:24 AM  
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That one tree yielded 30 quarts of peaches, sliced and frozen.
 
2021-10-19 8:12:25 AM  
Cold mud. Plenty of green still, but a lot of cold mud. Temps got down to 10 to 13 degrees this week, and cloudy, which just does not seem right somehow.

At this time of year, I take out a contraption I have and start bundling and cutting a pile of prunings that I have accumulated. You load it, compress the branches and twigs into about the diameter of a two liter bottle. Then you tie it and chop the ends off and you have a small dry bundle that you can throw into the woodstove when you need it.

The wood diameter is small, so it dries out well. You can use them to start a fire, OR to restart a fire that has gone to embers.

The stuff you chop off at the ends is pretty much short enough that it can be used for mulch. After you make about 90 bundles and stack them up with your cordwood, you are done, and you have "saved" 10 hours or so of huffing and puffing or checking a fire to make sure it is going to start up well. And I will die before I become one of those guys who puts all of their leaves and branches in a plastic bag and sends it to a landfill.

Haven't found a similar device on the internet. Plenty of branch binders and wood chippers and log splitters, but as far as I know, I am the only guy in the world who does this.
 
2021-10-19 8:14:03 AM  
I brought in my oregano and thyme; if I buy a humidifier, which I am thinking of doing, Rosemary can come in as well, as she won't survive all our Januarys. And I have a few chardlings coming up, not quite where I thought, so one will need to be thinned of brethren, then I'll see how they do/if they need to come inside.
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2021-10-19 8:18:43 AM  
We've finally been getting rain again, everything was looking pretty dry.   Cleaned out my veggies beds, then added shiat to them (literally!).  I moved some things that were getting way too much shade to do much, hopefully they will do better next year.  I pulled up peppers and eggplants to bring inside.  I still have one lone tomato plant holding on.  I tuckered myself out on Sunday.  I had company in the yard, but he wasn't much help.  Border collie only wants to herd me, not help me.

Trying to decide what/if I want fall/winter garden.   I'll probably have garlic to plant.
 
2021-10-19 8:23:36 AM  
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Grew sweet potatoes for the first time this year.  Picked this one that grew all poo pile shaped the other day.  It's been a really warm fall so I still have a lot of peppers and tomatoes growing.  All of our beets and other fall crops are coming along nicely too.  Just have to keep the squirrels out of them.
 
2021-10-19 8:29:23 AM  

puffy999: My camera sucks... But those things in the background (with a pod on the end of each stem) started growing this year in a relative's garden and we don't know what they are. Any help would be appreciated

[Fark user image image 850x1133]


Love-in-a-mist
 
2021-10-19 8:51:21 AM  
One of my autumn crocuses popped yesterday, I'm excited about my first three strands of saffron.
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2021-10-19 8:51:45 AM  
Start of Spring here so it's chilli season for me.

Last year I dumped a heap of seeds in pots not expecting much...and ended up with a backyard full of two types of jalapenos and multitudes of Bishops Crowns, among a few other varieties.

This year I went for mainly super hots and personal favourites however the weather Gods have delivered a very mild start so wasn't expecting much, then BAM! Up came a heap of Butch T Scorpions, Yellow Fatalis (my fave), Oz Brain Killer #1, Paper Lanterns yet sadly no Bhut Jolokias yet.

The hop plants are also starting to take off, this is the Chinook yesterday. When the other half & I get our own place it'll be time for proper garden beds for all involved :-)
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2021-10-19 9:01:19 AM  

The Bandit: sadly no Bhut Jolokias yet.


those were my last to flower as well. next couple of weeks will show if it's time to ferment for market, or just a small batch for home use...
 
2021-10-19 9:03:33 AM  
My current task list, transcribed from the Notepad Of Productivity:
-plant existing front bed stuff [we got the Japanese maple in last week! now it's just roses and some perennials and then I get to shop for season-end discounted plants to fill in the gaps :D]
-shop for more front bed stuff [see above]
-garlic?
-pull tomato plants & bin, no compost
-harvest peppers & eggplant
-pot up pepper plants, rosemaries

Out of probably 20 tomato plants, I got maybe two quarts of cherry tomatoes and half a dozen slicers/pastes. It was a horrendous year and I don't want any remnants of those rain-blighted plants left in the garden to taint next year's much reduced plantings.

Haven't had time to duck into any garden stores lately, so I don't know if seed garlic is sold out everywhere, but we've got at least a couple more weeks before frost so I'm hoping somebody still has stock.

The watermelon radishes I planted a few weeks ago are growing nicely and I'm really hoping they actually bulb up and do the cold weather crop thing. I've had terrible luck with anything else planted mid or late season. At least, anything I deliberately planted; I think I've gone through three generations of volunteer radishes since spring. Did y'all know you can eat radish seed pods? When they're new and tender they have the crunchy texture of a sugar snap pea and a wonderful fresh, sweet, slightly spicy flavor. It's been my saving grace after letting so many volunteers pass me by and go to seed again all summer. I meant to pick a bunch and try quick pickling them, but the time to do that slipped away too.
 
2021-10-19 9:10:59 AM  
Another 2 bags each of lettuce and bok choi from my hooped bed.  I'm loving this.  The stuff is growing like crazy.  We've had nights in the 40s lately, and if I go out in the morning and lift the hoop, I can feel the warm air come rushing up at me.  Great idea.

This is the plan I used.  Apologies for the overly-excited New Jersey guy.

How to Build a HINGED HOOPHOUSE for a Raised Bed Garden
Youtube ef_TS19TRQg


My perennial herbs are under another hoop cover and they seem to be ok.  Lovage wilted pretty badly but has plenty of new growth - it's a new plant, so it's not surprising that transplant shock hit it.

I'm still getting a few of the golden cherry tomatoes, but that's about it.

I'll plant my garlic at Halloween, and then once I yank the tomatoes I need to do some serious rototilling in the big bed where I had them, squash, and cucumbers - I've got a bunch more topsoil ready to mix in, and there are some weeks that I let run away from me that will need to get raked out.  I have a much better idea of what stuff to plant where next year.
 
2021-10-19 9:28:15 AM  
Well I've got a tomato growing in a bonsai pot so nature found a way.......

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2021-10-19 10:10:15 AM  

tuxq: It's down in the low 40s at night this week. My red ghost pepper plant is still hanging in there for it's last harvest, though. About 30-40 peppers on the plant, half of them full sized, just waiting to ripen.


If there's still a lot of peppers on it when the first hard frost is imminent, that's the kind of plant I'll uproot and hang upside down in the garage. Keep the roots intact, clean off as much dirt as you can (I rinse mine off with water), and the plant will put all it's remaining energy into ripening the last remaining pods. Makes a mess on the floor as the leaves dry out and fall off though.
 
2021-10-19 10:10:25 AM  
I still need to plant some garlic but not much to do now but wait for the cauliflower and brussels sprouts to mature.

Earlier this summer, I thought I had accidentally killed my zucchini plant but it came back from the dead. I was actually happy to harvest a couple of zucchini last week instead of being sick to death of them.

But now it's Fall and the rains have returned, which means it is mushroom season. Chanterelles have been scarce so far, so I didn't pick any on the foray I helped lead last week. I was helping the newbies instead. Most people got 1-2 lbs. Some years you can pick as many as you care to clean but we had a very dry summer. A guy in the park last week showed me some mushrooms he found. It was a group of 5-6 gigantic King Boletes! Caps were dinner plate sized and they must have weighed 2 lbs each. Alas, they were worm-eaten and rotten but still a cool find. They were right next to a clump of Amanita muscaria, the classic red mushroom with white dots. And no, I have never tried them. Sounds like a horrible experience, from the "trip reports" I've read.
 
2021-10-19 10:13:24 AM  

pheelix: tuxq: It's down in the low 40s at night this week. My red ghost pepper plant is still hanging in there for it's last harvest, though. About 30-40 peppers on the plant, half of them full sized, just waiting to ripen.

If there's still a lot of peppers on it when the first hard frost is imminent, that's the kind of plant I'll uproot and hang upside down in the garage. Keep the roots intact, clean off as much dirt as you can (I rinse mine off with water), and the plant will put all it's remaining energy into ripening the last remaining pods. Makes a mess on the floor as the leaves dry out and fall off though.


Or, like I mentioned last week, dig it up, put it in a pot and set it in a window-sill for the winter. Pick the peppers as they ripen and plant the pepper plant next year. Watch out for aphids.
 
2021-10-19 10:18:00 AM  
Looks like the only thing still growing are my carrots and some tomato plants that refuse to die. My garden batteries have drained too low too many times, so it is time to shut the greenhouse down for the year.
 
2021-10-19 10:28:54 AM  
I live in SE Wisconsin, close enough to Lake Michigan that I ***might*** avoid a hard frost for the next 10 days or so. It's a good thing because I still have a shiatload of peppers out in the Paingarden. I have more yellow Scotch bonnets, red savinas, and Tazmanian habaneros than I know what to do with. It was my first try with Hatch peppers this year. Had no idea whether they'd be successful or not. Turns out they do absolutely great here. Farking huge and lots of them. Several plants are now laying sideways from the weight of them. If you ever want to try something super juicy and sweet, but small enough that you can prepare a salad for 1 or 2 without any leftover, let me suggest the Bishop's Crown. It's a member of the c. Baccatum species, so it's possible never had a pepper that tastes like it. Supposedly they have heat, but two seasons with them I can tell you there is zero heat. Thin sliced from stem to blossom, they provide an interesting shape that augments the look of any salad or pizza and tastes as good or better than a garden-raised fresh red pepper.

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2021-10-19 10:37:07 AM  
It still hasn't frozen in the North Country yet, for some reason.  We still have a few tomatoes, a massive amount of peppers of all sorts, some huge daikons, and the fall carrots are doing well, except for the ones the deer ate.

I can't remember if I posted this pic last week, but anyway-- daikon:

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I've mostly been trying to preserve some of the peppers.  I won't use them all, but I'll try.

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The little bell-shaped peppers in the box are hot Hungarian paprikas.  I'm drying them and may smoke some of them before grinding into powder.

The rest are getting pickled.  The Carmen sweet Italian peppers get roasted under the broiler first.  Here's some sweet peppers and some hot banana rings:

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Mrs knobmaker likes these biquinhos, so I put up a few jars:

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Finally, not really gardening, but just to make all the other spouses on Fark a little envious, here's Mrs. knobmaker surveying 3 cords of wood she's just split and stacked.

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2021-10-19 10:39:25 AM  

pheelix: I live in SE Wisconsin, close enough to Lake Michigan that I ***might*** avoid a hard frost for the next 10 days or so. It's a good thing because I still have a shiatload of peppers out in the Paingarden. I have more yellow Scotch bonnets, red savinas, and Tazmanian habaneros than I know what to do with. It was my first try with Hatch peppers this year. Had no idea whether they'd be successful or not. Turns out they do absolutely great here. Farking huge and lots of them. Several plants are now laying sideways from the weight of them. If you ever want to try something super juicy and sweet, but small enough that you can prepare a salad for 1 or 2 without any leftover, let me suggest the Bishop's Crown. It's a member of the c. Baccatum species, so it's possible never had a pepper that tastes like it. Supposedly they have heat, but two seasons with them I can tell you there is zero heat. Thin sliced from stem to blossom, they provide an interesting shape that augments the look of any salad or pizza and tastes as good or better than a garden-raised fresh red pepper.

[Fark user image 387x387]


I have so many plants of these from a bumper seed raising last year (inadvertent). Lop off the top, scoop out the seeds & membrane, make up your fave Jalapeno popper cheese filling (for me, it's cream cheese, grated cheddar, salt, pepper, crushed handful of salted Thins chips) and fill them. Oven, bake, DAMN!
 
2021-10-19 10:45:53 AM  

CordycepsInYourBrain: pheelix: tuxq: It's down in the low 40s at night this week. My red ghost pepper plant is still hanging in there for it's last harvest, though. About 30-40 peppers on the plant, half of them full sized, just waiting to ripen.

If there's still a lot of peppers on it when the first hard frost is imminent, that's the kind of plant I'll uproot and hang upside down in the garage. Keep the roots intact, clean off as much dirt as you can (I rinse mine off with water), and the plant will put all it's remaining energy into ripening the last remaining pods. Makes a mess on the floor as the leaves dry out and fall off though.

Or, like I mentioned last week, dig it up, put it in a pot and set it in a window-sill for the winter. Pick the peppers as they ripen and plant the pepper plant next year. Watch out for aphids.


I've tried that a few times. The second year was never as prolific as the first. Fewer and smaller pods. Could be because the winters are so long here. I've tried a few different techniques too. I did a transplant that involved completely cleaning off the root ball and trimming back the roots followed by a trimming back of the entire plant. Zero aphids, which was fantastic, and the plant shed it's huge summer leaves and sprouted much smaller winter leaves very quickly. It stayed healthy all winter but come spring, once it was hardened off and back in the ground, it just didn't have the same vigor as a younger plant.
 
2021-10-19 10:50:24 AM  

The Bandit: pheelix: I live in SE Wisconsin, close enough to Lake Michigan that I ***might*** avoid a hard frost for the next 10 days or so. It's a good thing because I still have a shiatload of peppers out in the Paingarden. I have more yellow Scotch bonnets, red savinas, and Tazmanian habaneros than I know what to do with. It was my first try with Hatch peppers this year. Had no idea whether they'd be successful or not. Turns out they do absolutely great here. Farking huge and lots of them. Several plants are now laying sideways from the weight of them. If you ever want to try something super juicy and sweet, but small enough that you can prepare a salad for 1 or 2 without any leftover, let me suggest the Bishop's Crown. It's a member of the c. Baccatum species, so it's possible never had a pepper that tastes like it. Supposedly they have heat, but two seasons with them I can tell you there is zero heat. Thin sliced from stem to blossom, they provide an interesting shape that augments the look of any salad or pizza and tastes as good or better than a garden-raised fresh red pepper.

[Fark user image 387x387]

I have so many plants of these from a bumper seed raising last year (inadvertent). Lop off the top, scoop out the seeds & membrane, make up your fave Jalapeno popper cheese filling (for me, it's cream cheese, grated cheddar, salt, pepper, crushed handful of salted Thins chips) and fill them. Oven, bake, DAMN!


Totally agree. That cheese mix also works slicing a Hungarian wax or Hatch lengthwise, scooping out the seeds and white stuff, and putting the cheese inside of each half. I'll do them on a cast iron griddle over indirect heat in the grill as a snack while enjoying beers on the deck with company. People just grab'em and eat it like a hot dog.
 
2021-10-19 10:50:29 AM  
We mostly let our yard go native, a weed is just a plant growing where you don't want it. Drought resistant, abuse tolerant plants have been added for extra color, esperanza, pride of Barbados, lantana, sapphire duranta, crepe myrtles. It doesn't always freeze here every year anymore so they're thriving. I expected the freak snow storm to kill everything but they have all come back better than ever.
 
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