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(Some Guy)   World's only floating nuclear power plant opened to visitors. Not many visitors yet, needs more glowing reviews   (raillynews.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Nuclear power, Coal, Electricity generation, nuclear power plant, Energy development, Nuclear fission, International Atomic Energy Agency, World energy resources and consumption  
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2546 clicks; posted to Main » on 18 Oct 2021 at 6:35 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



46 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-10-18 5:31:17 PM  
How narrowly do you have to define "floating nuclear power plant" to include this, but none of the nuclear powered ships currently in existence (which are commonly capable of supplying power to the local grid from port)?
 
2021-10-18 5:39:18 PM  
You've never toured a Naval vessel making a port call? I'm pretty sure your mom has, Subby.
 
2021-10-18 5:45:12 PM  

JessieL: How narrowly do you have to define "floating nuclear power plant" to include this, but none of the nuclear powered ships currently in existence (which are commonly capable of supplying power to the local grid from port)?


Apparently, because it's a barge instead of a vessel (At least, according to Wiki it's not self propelled)
 
2021-10-18 6:06:35 PM  
It's Russian so that's not going to end well.
 
2021-10-18 6:37:04 PM  
wessels
 
2021-10-18 6:38:46 PM  

JessieL: How narrowly do you have to define "floating nuclear power plant" to include this, but none of the nuclear powered ships currently in existence (which are commonly capable of supplying power to the local grid from port)?


This.
 
2021-10-18 6:42:03 PM  
That sound like something Russians would.... OK yup.
 
2021-10-18 6:47:16 PM  

JessieL: How narrowly do you have to define "floating nuclear power plant" to include this, but none of the nuclear powered ships currently in existence (which are commonly capable of supplying power to the local grid from port)?


It's a Turkish site writing about Russian power generation, so I'd start near there.
 
2021-10-18 6:53:01 PM  

JessieL: How narrowly do you have to define "floating nuclear power plant" to include this, but none of the nuclear powered ships currently in existence (which are commonly capable of supplying power to the local grid from port)?


Sure you can do this, if you override the safety systems that would normally prevent it, but you are typically talking about less than a megawatt. The shore power connection for any ship is only what is needed to keep the ship in standby and reversing it would not be any better.  The sub I was on used two 600-amp 440 volt connections, that's about a half of a megawatt.

Ex-submariner who setup shore power way too many times.
 
2021-10-18 6:53:42 PM  
Participants visited the floating nuclear power plant in order to BE collectED and analyzeD FOR data on environmental and radiation safety

In Soviet Russia, the visit visits you.
 
2021-10-18 6:55:54 PM  
Russia only makes gas, oil, and Vodak and is a gas station masquerading as a country.

ChangeMyMind.jpg
 
2021-10-18 6:56:45 PM  

natazha: JessieL: How narrowly do you have to define "floating nuclear power plant" to include this, but none of the nuclear powered ships currently in existence (which are commonly capable of supplying power to the local grid from port)?

Sure you can do this, if you override the safety systems that would normally prevent it, but you are typically talking about less than a megawatt. The shore power connection for any ship is only what is needed to keep the ship in standby and reversing it would not be any better.  The sub I was on used two 600-amp 440 volt connections, that's about a half of a megawatt.

Ex-submariner who setup shore power way too many times.


Would GRU like to know more?
 
2021-10-18 6:58:28 PM  

gopher321: wessels


I saw what you did there, Checkov!
 
2021-10-18 7:06:07 PM  
s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2021-10-18 7:07:51 PM  
Nice boat.

It's not great, but it's not terrible.
 
2021-10-18 7:11:03 PM  

ColonelCathcart: Russia only makes gas, oil, and Vodak and is a gas station masquerading as a country.

ChangeMyMind.jpg


"Since the end of the Cold War, the Kalashnikov has become the Russian people's greatest export. After that comes vodka, caviar, and suicidal novelists."

-Yuri Orlov, Lord of War
 
2021-10-18 7:12:07 PM  

JessieL: which are commonly capable of supplying power to the local grid from port


They are not commonly capable of that.
 
2021-10-18 7:13:35 PM  
Not true. I have one.
 
2021-10-18 7:13:57 PM  

Bootleg: ColonelCathcart: Russia only makes gas, oil, and Vodak and is a gas station masquerading as a country.

ChangeMyMind.jpg

"Since the end of the Cold War, the Kalashnikov has become the Russian people's greatest export. After that comes vodka, caviar, and suicidal novelists."

-Yuri Orlov, Lord of War


I cannot argue with such wisdom.
 
2021-10-18 7:14:08 PM  

Bootleg: vessel


A "vessel" is a container for holding strong drink. What you are thinking of is a ship.
 
2021-10-18 7:18:29 PM  

JessieL: How narrowly do you have to define "floating nuclear power plant" to include this, but none of the nuclear powered ships currently in existence (which are commonly capable of supplying power to the local grid from port)?


A more specific answer is because most naval nuclear propulsion drives steam turbines that are geared down (reduction gears) to directly power the propulsion shaft[s] of the ship (or boat, for submarine nomenclature). Any electric generation is a minor amount for hotel power, and is not enough to feed into a power grid for any substantial use

Exceptions: There are some turbo-electric ships that have steam turbines driving electrical generation that then powers an electric motor to turn screws. The USA built the USS Glenard P. Lipscomb and the USS Tullibee as somewhat experimental submarines. The French built the Triomphant-class submarines. Just this month (October 01) the USA began construction of the Columbia-class submarines.
 
2021-10-18 7:36:11 PM  
Once upon a time, there was a plan have a "fleet" of floating nuclear power plants of the east coast of the US.  As a nuclear engineer with extensive power plant licensing experience, it's great that this didn't happen.
 
2021-10-18 7:36:30 PM  
After a Google search I found this plant to only generates 35 MW.  It's a small power plant.  But that's enough to easily power a town of 30,000.

For comparison the "Bill Gates" power plant is 300-400 MW.
 
2021-10-18 7:42:48 PM  
Only?
virginiamercury.comView Full Size
 
2021-10-18 7:46:50 PM  

MythDragon: Only?
[virginiamercury.com image 850x566]


Electricity generation capacity on the Nimitz-class is strained. Modern electronics added to those carriers leaves little margin to meet expanding demand for electrical power.
 
2021-10-18 7:51:04 PM  

Bootleg: JessieL: How narrowly do you have to define "floating nuclear power plant" to include this, but none of the nuclear powered ships currently in existence (which are commonly capable of supplying power to the local grid from port)?

Apparently, because it's a barge instead of a vessel (At least, according to Wiki it's not self propelled)


That distinction also works to keep the Navy's YRBM berthing barges from being called cruise ships.
 
2021-10-18 8:13:10 PM  
At least if it melts down, you can just sink it.
 
2021-10-18 8:17:35 PM  

alex10294: At least if it melts down, you can just sink it.


And that's how we get a kaiju .
 
2021-10-18 8:20:35 PM  
Bah, only 2.3 stars. https://tinyurl.com/28h4scs8
 
2021-10-18 8:22:52 PM  

alex10294: At least if it melts down, you can just sink it.


That was my thinking, too.

The modern designs for reactors have the solution to a loss-of-cooling-accident being that they have a dump tank of water that floods the area surrounding the reactor vessel. As long as you top that water off, the decay heat is removed by the water boiling into steam and dissipating into the atmosphere either through venting or through heat convection through the walls of the reactor containment vessel.

With a floating power plant, you could build the reactor vessel below the water line. Worst case scenario for cooling is that you flood the reactor compartment with water and it provides constant cooling. If you build the reactor above the water line, the worst case scenario is you scuttle the ship and the surrounding water cools it for a few weeks or months until you make plans to recover the ship.
 
2021-10-18 8:54:23 PM  
Graphite fires burn under water.
 
2021-10-18 9:00:58 PM  

zeaper12: After a Google search I found this plant to only generates 35 MW.  It's a small power plant.  But that's enough to easily power a town of 30,000.

For comparison the "Bill Gates" power plant is 300-400 MW.


Rosatom says 2 reactors, 35MW each, supposed to have total capacity to power a town of 100K.


Bootleg: JessieL: How narrowly do you have to define "floating nuclear power plant" to include this, but none of the nuclear powered ships currently in existence (which are commonly capable of supplying power to the local grid from port)?

Apparently, because it's a barge instead of a vessel (At least, according to Wiki it's not self propelled)


The USA used to have one of those too. The Sturgis was converted to a nuclear barge in the 1960s; it provided about 10MW of power (mostly in Panama). It was apparently a real biatch to dismantle years later. Hard to imagine Russia going to the same trouble when they're done with theirs.


natazha: JessieL: How narrowly do you have to define "floating nuclear power plant" to include this, but none of the nuclear powered ships currently in existence (which are commonly capable of supplying power to the local grid from port)?

Sure you can do this, if you override the safety systems that would normally prevent it, but you are typically talking about less than a megawatt. The shore power connection for any ship is only what is needed to keep the ship in standby and reversing it would not be any better.  The sub I was on used two 600-amp 440 volt connections, that's about a half of a megawatt.

Ex-submariner who setup shore power way too many times.


When Kauai got hit by a storm in 1982 the Navy was planning to have the Indianapolis "jump start" the local power plant (i.e., not to power the island, but to get the plant functioning) but decided even that, while feasible, would be too big a pain in the ass and instead brought in a 1.5MW generator by barge from the West Coast to do the job.

Tangential anecdote: the Lexington once provided power to Tacoma for about a month (because their hydroelectric got farked by a drought in 1929). The hookup was rated for 20MW and the total power provided was 4.5 million kWh. She was turbo-electric and the ship service power generators were separate from main propulsion.
 
2021-10-18 9:02:47 PM  
it says moops
 
2021-10-18 9:19:49 PM  

ocelot: Graphite fires burn under water.


Not a graphite moderated reactor.
 
2021-10-18 9:26:59 PM  

Bootleg: JessieL: How narrowly do you have to define "floating nuclear power plant" to include this, but none of the nuclear powered ships currently in existence (which are commonly capable of supplying power to the local grid from port)?

Apparently, because it's a barge instead of a vessel (At least, according to Wiki it's not self propelled)


There's still Moored Training Ships that aren't self-propelled (any longer). I did prototype on one of them, the Daniel Webster.
 
2021-10-18 9:34:28 PM  

Avigdore: There's still Moored Training Ships that aren't self-propelled (any longer).


Does the USS Constitution count? She's not self-propelled and she's a training ship.
 
2021-10-18 10:03:25 PM  

MythDragon: Only?
[virginiamercury.com image 850x566]


NS Savannah is like "am I joke to you?"
 
2021-10-18 10:15:18 PM  
Between the subs and aircraft carriers there must be a hundred jiggawatts worth of floating nuclear power plants.
 
2021-10-18 10:43:55 PM  

JessieL: How narrowly do you have to define "floating nuclear power plant" to include this, but none of the nuclear powered ships currently in existence (which are commonly capable of supplying power to the local grid from port)?


Best guess, the ships that are nuclear powered are rated for what they do. Nothing extra available.

This one (barge) is specifically designed to put out way more power than it needs, thus making it a power plant.
 
2021-10-18 10:51:16 PM  

mrmopar5287: Bootleg: vessel

A "vessel" is a container for holding strong drink. What you are thinking of is a ship.


Now do schooners!
/Dumbass
 
2021-10-18 11:00:09 PM  

Intrepid00: MythDragon: Only?
[virginiamercury.com image 850x566]

NS Savannah is like "am I joke to you?"


Here's the top of NS Savannah's reactor (the orange thing) in a photo I took inside the containment vessel:

Fark user imageView Full Size

This was during the 2017 Christmas Party.
 
2021-10-18 11:06:14 PM  

Creepy Lurker Guy: Intrepid00: MythDragon: Only?
[virginiamercury.com image 850x566]

NS Savannah is like "am I joke to you?"

Here's the top of NS Savannah's reactor (the orange thing) in a photo I took inside the containment vessel:

[Fark user image image 850x637]
This was during the 2017 Christmas Party.


Lucky you. I only have a picture of the green door to it.
 
2021-10-18 11:15:56 PM  
Could have used 3 wind turbines.
 
2021-10-18 11:28:59 PM  

Intrepid00: Creepy Lurker Guy: Intrepid00: MythDragon: Only?
[virginiamercury.com image 850x566]

NS Savannah is like "am I joke to you?"

Here's the top of NS Savannah's reactor (the orange thing) in a photo I took inside the containment vessel:

[Fark user image image 850x637]
This was during the 2017 Christmas Party.

Lucky you. I only have a picture of the green door to it.


I know which door you mean.  A few years ago they cut-out a large section of the wall of the containment vessel, so you can just walk in.  This is to make it more accessible for public display someday.  Of course the pandemic has shut down all activities.  By 2030 the radiation level will be low enough they can ditch the nuclear license, and she can become a museum-ship and be open to the public continuously.
 
2021-10-19 10:35:37 AM  
It's Russian so I've no doubt it will become a submarine nuclear reactor very soon
 
2021-10-19 11:59:17 AM  
And then all the guests died.
 
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