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(Science Alert)   Galaxy:"Hi, I'm NGC 2005. Who are you?" Large Magellanic Cloud:"OM NOM NOM"   (sciencealert.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Milky Way, Galaxy, Milky Way galaxy, globular cluster, team of astronomers, Large Magellanic Cloud, small number of stars, smaller satellite galaxies  
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817 clicks; posted to STEM » on 18 Oct 2021 at 8:05 PM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-10-18 8:15:30 PM  
FWIW, galaxies are so sparse they can literally pass through one another without a single star physically colliding.
 
2021-10-18 8:45:40 PM  
media.distractify.comView Full Size
 
2021-10-18 9:30:37 PM  

Excelsior: FWIW, galaxies are so sparse they can literally pass through one another without a single star physically colliding.


Yeah, but the gravitational effects make them super swirly!
 
2021-10-18 9:52:06 PM  
I clearly labeled that galaxy "Morg's lunch. Do not touch!"
 
2021-10-18 10:44:04 PM  
c.tenor.com
 
2021-10-18 10:59:34 PM  
Video illustrations of galaxies merging tend to show large amounts of stars thrown off into space by the process. It isn't like they just cease to exist, so where are they?  Wouldn't they eventually form into smaller blobs surrounding the newly merged blob?
 
2021-10-18 11:31:32 PM  

Nonrepeating Rotating Binary: Video illustrations of galaxies merging tend to show large amounts of stars thrown off into space by the process. It isn't like they just cease to exist, so where are they?  Wouldn't they eventually form into smaller blobs surrounding the newly merged blob?


Space is big. Really big. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the street to the nearest galaxy, but that's just peanuts to space...

Think of it this way: two galaxies merge, and some stars pass close(ish) to each other. One star is accelerated/slingshot out, the other loses energy and falls in. The ones you see in the simulations flying off into nowhere are the ones that were accelerated to velocities faster than the escape velocity of the entire merged galaxy.

They don't form into anything. To shrink the problem down to a more human scale, yes, Voyager 1, Voyager 2, and Pioneers 10 and 11 and the New Horizons probe are all exerting gravitational force on each other, but they got enough of a gravitational assist that will never return to the Solar System.

Even if our solar system were the only thing in the universe, they would never-ever-ever-ever-ever-ever-to-th​e-everth-power coalesce into a Voltron of ancient spaceprobes, because they're moving apart from each other insanely faster than their meager mutual gravitational attraction could ever compensate for.

Scale that up a few gazillion times, and it's the same with 1-10-solar-mass stars and hundred-billion-solar-mass galaxies. When a star is ejected from a galactic system, it is gone.
 
2021-10-19 12:42:50 AM  
"Busted!"


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2021-10-19 2:34:56 AM  
I read a sci-fi story somewhere that was about an alien intelligence basically blowing up random planets in a galaxy to facilitate a future collision between that galaxy and an incoming galaxy. If the 'right' systems were destroyed then the galaxies would pass each other or merge without destroying each other.
The problem was that the intelligent creatures on the target systems did not want to get splattered for the 'greater good'.

Don't remember what the final outcome was.
 
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