Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Hill)   EPA to start regulating certain 'forever chemicals' in drinking water beginning in 2023. In other news, the EPA doesn't currently regulate certain 'forever chemicals' and is going to wait over a year to start   (thehill.com) divider line
    More: PSA, United States Environmental Protection Agency, Hazardous waste, Drinking water, Regulation, Superfund, EPA's overall strategy, Pollution, Trump administration  
•       •       •

1296 clicks; posted to Main » and STEM » on 18 Oct 2021 at 11:15 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



53 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all

 
2021-10-18 10:54:32 AM  
So one year of regulation. Super.
 
2021-10-18 11:12:08 AM  
This is criminal on the part of our Government. No surprise anymore after they keep ignoring Flint and push on with DAPL and Line 3. Clean drinking water? Who needs that?

Just wait til we find out how bad those groundwater plumes are from all those airforce bases, airports and other industrial areas that used these chemicals.
 
2021-10-18 11:21:50 AM  
What's the big deal about it taking another year?  It's not like the chemicals are going anywhere.
 
2021-10-18 11:22:05 AM  
It's fine, I always wanted some cancer.
 
2021-10-18 11:23:14 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-10-18 11:23:14 AM  
Not-so-fun fact: these compounds are in almost everybody's blood today. Even newborns freshly delivered.

The only blood that demonstrably lacked these was the lab-preserved blood of a Korean War vet.

Gives me the heebie-jeebies.
 
2021-10-18 11:23:35 AM  
Why would you trust the EPA to protect the environment?
 
2021-10-18 11:23:39 AM  
So?  In some cities, there is a high percentage of "dangerous drugs" so who cares?
 
2021-10-18 11:26:12 AM  
Two of the chemicals it will publish these assessments for are known as "GenX chemicals," which have been found in water and air

Ah, yes, I forgot about those.
 
2021-10-18 11:26:17 AM  

Nadie_AZ: This is criminal on the part of our Government. No surprise anymore after they keep ignoring Flint and push on with DAPL and Line 3. Clean drinking water? Who needs that?

Just wait til we find out how bad those groundwater plumes are from all those airforce bases, airports and other industrial areas that used these chemicals.


I'm pretty sure we already known how bad they are.  They just kick the can a bit to avoid having to do much about them...
 
2021-10-18 11:26:31 AM  
Real Americans demand the right to ingest temporary, forever, and future chemicals.
 
2021-10-18 11:26:34 AM  
Who'd have though John Oliver has this much pull?
 
2021-10-18 11:26:44 AM  
So? some farkers pride themselves on eating the teflon flakes that chip off their frying pans so who cares?
 
2021-10-18 11:28:54 AM  

p51d007: So?  In some cities, there is a high percentage of "dangerous drugs" so who cares?


Well, I do. Dangerous drugs remedy the effect of "forever chemicals", so the higher percentage of drugs in a city the more likely you find me.
 
2021-10-18 11:29:23 AM  

Munden: So? some farkers pride themselves on eating the teflon flakes that chip off their frying pans so who cares?


It adds a certain zing that you just can't get with cast iron.
 
2021-10-18 11:30:25 AM  
John Oliver strikes again.

PFAS: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
Youtube 9W74aeuqsiU
 
2021-10-18 11:31:58 AM  
Just in time for the next administration to say fark it and roll back the new regulations. Great.
 
2021-10-18 11:34:02 AM  
But think of  all the cool plastic stuff that has enriched our lives and our economy.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-10-18 11:34:24 AM  
Wait, wait, wait... You're saying that we need regulations because corporations can't be trusted to do the right thing and be 'good corporate citizens'?
 
2021-10-18 11:34:54 AM  

tasteme: p51d007: So?  In some cities, there is a high percentage of "dangerous drugs" so who cares?

Well, I do. Dangerous drugs remedy the effect of "forever chemicals", so the higher percentage of drugs in a city the more likely you find me.


Use name checks out??
 
2021-10-18 11:38:14 AM  
i don't love the current EPA and there is no doubt they could be much better in both their regulatory approach and analytical methods but we are FAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAR better off with the EPA than without.   It is one of the few times we have the real world null case and that wasn't a great time.

lakekleenerz.orgView Full Size
 
2021-10-18 11:39:49 AM  
Full disclosure - I am an EPA employee who does analysis for PFAS in drinking water. That being said, most analysis of drinking water is done by state and local labs. All we do is set national standards and blueprints for the extraction and analysis of PFAS in drinking water which labs are to abide by.

There are relatively few times in which our lab collects and analyzes for PFAS in DW - and it's generally when the states don't want to pay for it or that they've neglected to follow up on complaints from the locals in the area. In North Carolina, for example, Chemours (a subsidiary of DuPont) was dumping Gen-X into the Cape Fear River for years, along with a few other PFAS. The irony was that it was manufactured because of the heavier ones lasting forever in comparison.

PFAS compounds aren't fully regulated by the EPA in terms of minimal ppt at the moment, but the action level is considered to be 70 ppt or higher for PFOA and PFOS combined as of right now. That may become official within the next few years.
 
2021-10-18 11:41:00 AM  

BorgiaGinz: John Oliver strikes again.

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/9W74aeuq​siU]


I'm a fan of John Oliver but if you think the piece he did a couple weeks ago sprung the EPA into action you are out of your mind.  setting up this kind of regulation takes years.

One of the big problems is the the EPA can't regulate chemicals until they are in the environment causing damage.  the real solution would be to allow the EPA to control things like the 2nd, 3rd, etc gen PFAS/PFOA before they are released.
 
2021-10-18 11:50:51 AM  

tom baker's scarf: BorgiaGinz: John Oliver strikes again.

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/9W74aeuq​siU]

I'm a fan of John Oliver but if you think the piece he did a couple weeks ago sprung the EPA into action you are out of your mind.  setting up this kind of regulation takes years.

One of the big problems is the the EPA can't regulate chemicals until they are in the environment causing damage.  the real solution would be to allow the EPA to control things like the 2nd, 3rd, etc gen PFAS/PFOA before they are released.


I would imagine it all helps.

But what really brought it to everyone's attention was the movie Dark Waters and the book it was based off of detailing the decades of fighting DuPont dumping those chemicals into the water supply.  I doubt they're the only ones doing it, but they're the biggest.
 
2021-10-18 11:54:47 AM  

Nadie_AZ: This is criminal on the part of our Government. No surprise anymore after they keep ignoring Flint and push on with DAPL and Line 3. Clean drinking water? Who needs that?

Just wait til we find out how bad those groundwater plumes are from all those airforce bases, airports and other industrial areas that used these chemicals.


You can't just 'give' people clean water.  They have to work for it or it won't mean anything to them.


/s
 
2021-10-18 12:02:22 PM  
 
2021-10-18 12:31:57 PM  

sandbar67: Why would you trust the EPA to protect the environment?


LOL, well after the GQP has basically destroyed it over the years, with some corporate Dem help, that's a great question. Maybe we should work to make sure it is restored in it's full abilities. Unless you are some libertarian arsehole, in which case you can bugger off.
 
2021-10-18 12:36:47 PM  
I was a little surprised 3M didn't get more heat from Oliver. They've been dumping random hazards into Minnesota since the 50s. To be fair, they did just dump it in the grass, instead of the lakes, how were they to know it would seep into the groundwater?  Nice of them to tell Dupont not to do what they did.
 
2021-10-18 12:45:51 PM  

tom baker's scarf: BorgiaGinz: John Oliver strikes again.

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/9W74aeuq​siU]

I'm a fan of John Oliver but if you think the piece he did a couple weeks ago sprung the EPA into action you are out of your mind.  setting up this kind of regulation takes years.

One of the big problems is the the EPA can't regulate chemicals until they are in the environment causing damage.  the real solution would be to allow the EPA to control things like the 2nd, 3rd, etc gen PFAS/PFOA before they are released.


Let me have my comfortable fiction, thank you very much!
 
2021-10-18 12:45:57 PM  

JAGChem82: Full disclosure - I am an EPA employee who does analysis for PFAS in drinking water. That being said, most analysis of drinking water is done by state and local labs. All we do is set national standards and blueprints for the extraction and analysis of PFAS in drinking water which labs are to abide by.

There are relatively few times in which our lab collects and analyzes for PFAS in DW - and it's generally when the states don't want to pay for it or that they've neglected to follow up on complaints from the locals in the area. In North Carolina, for example, Chemours (a subsidiary of DuPont) was dumping Gen-X into the Cape Fear River for years, along with a few other PFAS. The irony was that it was manufactured because of the heavier ones lasting forever in comparison.

PFAS compounds aren't fully regulated by the EPA in terms of minimal ppt at the moment, but the action level is considered to be 70 ppt or higher for PFOA and PFOS combined as of right now. That may become official within the next few years.


The discomforting thing is, taking part in the analysis for these compounds. The UCMR5 (unregulated contaminate monitoring rule) study that will help set the compounds to be tested for, is difficult to reach in sensitivity. The test asks for 1 ppt or lower for lab blanks but this stuff is in everything from scotchguarded carpet, to fabric softener and, fast food wrappers. It is even in the instruments which have to be retrofitted for analysis. 6:2 FTS is the current pain in my life.
 
2021-10-18 1:03:34 PM  
Forever chemicals like di-hydrogen monoxide?
 
2021-10-18 1:04:15 PM  
Does Julia Roberts know about this?
 
2021-10-18 1:13:29 PM  

sandbar67: Why would you trust the EPA to protect the environment?


Well if some idiots would stop electing scumbags who are perfectly happy to burn the planet and the future of humanity to the ground to increase the wealth of a select few, then we probably could.  I am going to take a leap of intuition and assume your on the supply side of the problem.

Pollution is just letting big business shift the cost and harm of their for profit operations to the public.  That's some quality socialism right there.
 
2021-10-18 1:16:47 PM  

cryinoutloud: But think of  all the cool plastic stuff that has enriched our lives and our economy.

[Fark user image image 536x156]


Well a lot of progress has been made with biodegradable materials, etc.

The real killer is disposable plastics. Instead of tossing cans and bottles into recycling, use fewer of ghem to begin with.

Also, if you're worried about trace organics in your drinking water, get a good water filtration system that removes them.
 
2021-10-18 1:21:31 PM  
Thanks Biden!
 
2021-10-18 1:26:31 PM  

137 Is An Excellent Time: Thanks Biden!


Abolish the EPA...let the free market sort out our drinking water.  Hurrrrrrrrr
 
2021-10-18 1:33:09 PM  

guestguy: Abolish the EPA...let the free market sort out our drinking water.  Hurrrrrrrrr


I was thanking Biden for allowing these idiots to pollute for another 12 months before doing anything about it. Your attitude; you should check it.
 
2021-10-18 1:43:32 PM  

137 Is An Excellent Time: guestguy: Abolish the EPA...let the free market sort out our drinking water.  Hurrrrrrrrr

I was thanking Biden for allowing these idiots to pollute for another 12 months before doing anything about it. Your attitude; you should check it.


Agencies don't get to just enact new regulations on the spot. It's a very lengthy and involved process.
 
2021-10-18 1:53:31 PM  

137 Is An Excellent Time: guestguy: Abolish the EPA...let the free market sort out our drinking water.  Hurrrrrrrrr

I was thanking Biden for allowing these idiots to pollute for another 12 months before doing anything about it. Your attitude; you should check it.


Ah yes, if there's anyone I should check my attitude with, it's a 4-month-old concern troll account...
 
2021-10-18 2:03:31 PM  
But it makes a nice cocktail with all the bisphenol-A and phthalates in today's environment.
 
2021-10-18 2:30:44 PM  

bluejeansonfire: Not-so-fun fact: these compounds are in almost everybody's blood today. Even newborns freshly delivered.

The only blood that demonstrably lacked these was the lab-preserved blood of a Korean War vet.

Gives me the heebie-jeebies.


Watch dark waters, with an 's', not the shiatty horror flick. It's actually way more terrifying, because it's true.
 
2021-10-18 2:37:20 PM  

jake3988: tom baker's scarf: BorgiaGinz: John Oliver strikes again.

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/9W74aeuq​siU]

I'm a fan of John Oliver but if you think the piece he did a couple weeks ago sprung the EPA into action you are out of your mind.  setting up this kind of regulation takes years.

One of the big problems is the the EPA can't regulate chemicals until they are in the environment causing damage.  the real solution would be to allow the EPA to control things like the 2nd, 3rd, etc gen PFAS/PFOA before they are released.

I would imagine it all helps.

But what really brought it to everyone's attention was the movie Dark Waters and the book it was based off of detailing the decades of fighting DuPont dumping those chemicals into the water supply.  I doubt they're the only ones doing it, but they're the biggest.


And I will recommend again. A movie well worth watching. Or read the book if you have time.
 
2021-10-18 2:41:46 PM  

sandbar67: Why would you trust the EPA to protect the environment?


We'd be a lot worse off without them, I know that much.
 
2021-10-18 3:02:17 PM  

LL316: sandbar67: Why would you trust the EPA to protect the environment?

We'd be a lot worse off without them, I know that much.


The sad part is the people calling to deregulate know that too.

EPA was created in 1970, well within the lifetimes of politicians, and before that conditions were atrocious: rivers on fire, nearly entire towns dying in overnight inversions, I met someone whose parents wouldn't let him swim in a certain part of the river because there was a sunken car in it.

And in less than 50 years all of that is unthinkable to the youngest generations.

The people calling for deregulation lived through what they're cursing their children to, and don't care.
 
2021-10-18 3:17:34 PM  

Bertuccio: EPA was created in 1970, well within the lifetimes of politicians, and before that conditions were atrocious: rivers on fire, nearly entire towns dying in overnight inversions, I met someone whose parents wouldn't let him swim in a certain part of the river because there was a sunken car in it.


My most vibrant memories of going to Philly as a kid (we lived in South Jersey) were that most times you couldn't even *SEE* the city until you were most of the way across the Walt Whitman bridge.  Even on beautiful clear days, the amount of orange-brown smog pretty much acted as a cloaking device. And you didn't dare go near the waterfront on either side of the Delaware for fear of catching something just by contact with the toxic sludge.

This was in the *EARLY 80s*. Not even 40 years ago. I try to tell my kids about that and they just stare at me like I have lobsters crawling out of my ears.
 
2021-10-18 3:55:52 PM  

thehobbes: Who'd have though John Oliver has this much pull?


This isn't his first rodeo.

Net Neutrality: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
Youtube fpbOEoRrHyU
 
2021-10-18 4:18:22 PM  

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Two of the chemicals it will publish these assessments for are known as "GenX chemicals," which have been found in water and air

Ah, yes, I forgot about those.


Sorry, y'all, I had to pee.
 
2021-10-18 4:21:50 PM  

sandbar67: Why would you trust the EPA to protect the environment?


Government agencies are named for the antithesis of their purpose.
 
2021-10-18 4:22:58 PM  

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Two of the chemicals it will publish these assessments for are known as "GenX chemicals," which have been found in water and air

Ah, yes, I forgot about those.


Whatever
 
2021-10-18 4:24:13 PM  

Munden: So? some farkers pride themselves on eating the teflon flakes that chip off their frying pans so who cares?


Honestly it tastes better than the paint chips
 
Displayed 50 of 53 comments


Oldest | « | 1 | 2 | » | Newest | Show all


View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.