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(Polygon)   An explanation of the reasons for the probable upcoming strike of Hollywood craft workers. TL;DR: It's all about the streaming   (polygon.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Strike action, Television program, Film, Trade union, Harlan County, USA, equivalent of popular media production today, local IATSE chapters, issues of work hours  
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687 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 16 Oct 2021 at 2:43 PM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



24 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-10-16 2:47:18 PM  
As pointed out in other articles, fighting for streaming money doesn't explain the strikes at John Deere, Kellogg's, etc, nor the "great resignation."
 
2021-10-16 3:00:10 PM  

Trocadero: As pointed out in other articles, fighting for streaming money doesn't explain the strikes at John Deere, Kellogg's, etc, nor the "great resignation."


I wasn't aware you could download a Tractor and then screw the workers that built it because it was downloaded. Do tell us more.
 
2021-10-16 3:24:18 PM  

Trocadero: As pointed out in other articles, fighting for streaming money doesn't explain the strikes at John Deere, Kellogg's, etc, nor the "great resignation."


And why should it? Look, when you get down to it, almost all strikes boil down to compensation and working conditions. TFA is about one union and how those standard concerns in this case relate to the changes streaming has brought to Hollywood.
 
2021-10-16 3:26:37 PM  
I didn't know a porn fetish like streaming would affect the entire entertainment industry.
 
2021-10-16 3:42:52 PM  

Trocadero: As pointed out in other articles, fighting for streaming money doesn't explain the strikes at John Deere, Kellogg's, etc, nor the "great resignation."


True, but streaming is a big part of it here, mostly because the financial landscape has changed and Hollywood companies are screwing over this union by being able to pay out way less than they would otherwise.

Like all other strikes, it's about rights and equity, and about fair hours and pay. This strike just happens to have a specific angle to part of it. But the strike isn't solely about streaming.
 
2021-10-16 3:44:57 PM  
It has nothing to do with streaming, it's about working conditions and the fat cats at the top hoarding the proceeds.
 
2021-10-16 3:51:38 PM  

JammerJim: Trocadero: As pointed out in other articles, fighting for streaming money doesn't explain the strikes at John Deere, Kellogg's, etc, nor the "great resignation."

And why should it? Look, when you get down to it, almost all strikes boil down to compensation and working conditions. TFA is about one union and how those standard concerns in this case relate to the changes streaming has brought to Hollywood.


There haven't been this many strikes since the 1970s, I think it's awesome. Too many workers have been getting screwed for way too long.
 
2021-10-16 4:05:09 PM  
It's not streaming inherently, it's that switching to a streaming distribution model has provided a transparent excuse for employers to behave in openly abusive ways "because it's all different now".

Basically look at how rideshare apps "disrupted" cabs and delivery services... by making the employees sharecroppers using a business model from the 1870s designed to allow plantation owners to have slaves without actually "having slaves", which has been outright illegal since the early 1900s.  The internet didn't magically make Uber's business model legal, it's still super farking illegal.  It just gave them a transparent veil of willful ignorance to hide behind.  "Oh, no, they're not employees at a cab company, they're independent contractors with an internet service".

It's not quite as bad as Uber's literal indenture-style slavery arrangements for this union yet, but they're basically being proactive about blocking a slide in the same direction before it gets out of hand this time.  Which is a good idea, and demonstrates why unions are vital to preventing capitalism from eating itself immediately.

As others have already pointed out, the "streaming's totally different, I don't have to follow the law or contract provisions anymore" is hardly the only stupid excuse companies have used to try to get out of their responsibilities, it's basically one of a hundred grabbed from a hat at random because corporations are inherently violently inimical to human life.
 
2021-10-16 4:05:32 PM  
Adam Savage had some interesting insights on his last live stream. He's got experience on both sides of the table and said that something has to give on the work loads. They are unsustainable as things are.
 
2021-10-16 4:07:42 PM  

Gooch: It has nothing to do with streaming, it's about working conditions and the fat cats at the top hoarding the proceeds.


You're right and wrong :P

It is definitely about the fat cats and shareholders getting the lion's share of the proceeds.  But they are using the structure of existing contracts that have different rules for different production types to do so.  Movie sets have pretty hard and fast worker protections in place.  TV productions have a bit more leeway in that TV tends to need a bit more flexibility with live shows.

Streaming, however, wasn't really the thing it is now when the contracts were negotiated, and more importantly, the penalties for requiring overtime and skipping breaks are far less than the costs involved in adding additional days to a shoot.  This means production companies are forcing 12-14 hour days on crews with few breaks and just paying the penalties rather than paying the fair days wages they'd have to if they ran the production the way movie and TV productions are required to be.

The potential strike is labor demanding these practices that are mostly unique to streaming productions cease.
 
2021-10-16 4:47:54 PM  
Theaters are disgusting and obsolete. Time to get rid of them and accept the fact that streaming is the future.
 
2021-10-16 4:58:43 PM  

lindalouwho: There haven't been this many strikes since the 1970s, I think it's awesome. Too many workers have been getting screwed for way too long.


THIS!!!
 
2021-10-16 5:32:20 PM  
It is most definitely not about streaming.    It is about better wages and shorter hours.   12 hours is the usual minimum day and you usually end up with 4-6 hours sleep after long physically draining days.   It becomes very dangerous driving to work.

On the last show I was on the camera trainee fell asleep while driving home.  Thankfully he was at a red light but a cop pulled him over and charged him.

Only a matter of time before someone dies.
 
2021-10-16 7:02:43 PM  

lindalouwho: JammerJim: Trocadero: As pointed out in other articles, fighting for streaming money doesn't explain the strikes at John Deere, Kellogg's, etc, nor the "great resignation."

And why should it? Look, when you get down to it, almost all strikes boil down to compensation and working conditions. TFA is about one union and how those standard concerns in this case relate to the changes streaming has brought to Hollywood.

There haven't been this many strikes since the 1970s, I think it's awesome. Too many workers have been getting screwed for way too long.



I can't believe it took this long.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-10-16 7:06:43 PM  

optikeye: Trocadero: As pointed out in other articles, fighting for streaming money doesn't explain the strikes at John Deere, Kellogg's, etc, nor the "great resignation."

I wasn't aware you could download a Tractor and then screw the workers that built it because it was downloaded. Do tell us more.


Dude I've 3D printed a lot of full size combines.
 
2021-10-16 7:33:50 PM  
One of my friends that works in the industry and I recently caught up about this. She admitted in the last 6 months she's fallen asleep at the wheel five times. This isn't about streaming. It's about working conditions. The streaming companies claim they can't afford X, Y, and even Z. But that's a symptom, not the disease.
 
2021-10-16 7:35:23 PM  

AAAAGGGGHHHH: Theaters are disgusting and obsolete. Time to get rid of them and accept the fact that streaming is the future.


I know you're joking, but I've seen people make this argument with less tongue in cheek. I just point out that people always have a desire to experience mass consumed entertainment together.

Look at major sports, especially the NFL. It's ridiculously better on TV, to say nothing of the cost savings and how much better / cheaper TVs themselves have gotten in the last 20 years. Why does every game still sell out?
 
2021-10-16 8:09:04 PM  

austerity101: Trocadero: As pointed out in other articles, fighting for streaming money doesn't explain the strikes at John Deere, Kellogg's, etc, nor the "great resignation."

True, but streaming is a big part of it here, mostly because the financial landscape has changed and Hollywood companies are screwing over this union by being able to pay out way less than they would otherwise.

Like all other strikes, it's about rights and equity, and about fair hours and pay. This strike just happens to have a specific angle to part of it. But the strike isn't solely about streaming.


Jim_Callahan: It's not streaming inherently, it's that switching to a streaming distribution model has provided a transparent excuse for employers to behave in openly abusive ways "because it's all different now".

Basically look at how rideshare apps "disrupted" cabs and delivery services... by making the employees sharecroppers using a business model from the 1870s designed to allow plantation owners to have slaves without actually "having slaves", which has been outright illegal since the early 1900s.  The internet didn't magically make Uber's business model legal, it's still super farking illegal.  It just gave them a transparent veil of willful ignorance to hide behind.  "Oh, no, they're not employees at a cab company, they're independent contractors with an internet service".

It's not quite as bad as Uber's literal indenture-style slavery arrangements for this union yet, but they're basically being proactive about blocking a slide in the same direction before it gets out of hand this time.  Which is a good idea, and demonstrates why unions are vital to preventing capitalism from eating itself immediately.

As others have already pointed out, the "streaming's totally different, I don't have to follow the law or contract provisions anymore" is hardly the only stupid excuse companies have used to try to get out of their responsibilities, it's basically one of a hundred grabbed from a hat at random because corporations are inherently violently inimical to human life.


"Technological innovation is not what is hammering down working peoples' share of what the country earns; technological innovation is the excuse for this development. Inno is a fable that persuades us to accept economic arrangements we would otherwise regard as unpleasant or intolerable-that convinces us that the very particular configuration of economic power we inhabit is in fact a neutral matter of science, of nature, of the way God wants things to be. Every time we describe the economy as an 'ecosystem' we accept this point of view. Every time we write off the situation of workers as a matter of unalterable 'reality' we resign ourselves to it.

In truth, we have been hearing some version of all this inno-talk since the 1970s -- a snarling Republican iteration, which demands our submission before the almighty entrepreneur; and a friendly and caring Democratic one, which promises to patch us up with job training and student loans. What each version brushes under the rug is that it doesn't have to be this way. Economies aren't ecosystems. They aren't naturally occurring phenomena to which we must learn to acclimate. Their rules are made by humans. They are, in a word, political. In a democracy we can set the economic table however we choose.

'Amazon is not happening to bookselling,' Jeff Bezos of Amazon likes to say. 'The future is happening to bookselling.' And what the future wants just happens to be exactly what Amazon wants. What an amazing coincidence." -- Thomas Frank, "Listen, Liberal"
 
2021-10-16 8:35:28 PM  

Rock Krenn: lindalouwho: JammerJim: Trocadero: As pointed out in other articles, fighting for streaming money doesn't explain the strikes at John Deere, Kellogg's, etc, nor the "great resignation."

And why should it? Look, when you get down to it, almost all strikes boil down to compensation and working conditions. TFA is about one union and how those standard concerns in this case relate to the changes streaming has brought to Hollywood.

There haven't been this many strikes since the 1970s, I think it's awesome. Too many workers have been getting screwed for way too long.


I can't believe it took this long.

[Fark user image image 756x519]


Me neither.
 
2021-10-16 8:38:02 PM  
 
2021-10-16 9:49:51 PM  
 
2021-10-16 10:57:14 PM  

CarnySaur: I didn't know a porn fetish like streaming would affect the entire entertainment industry.


...it's "watersports". Get it right.
 
2021-10-16 11:00:05 PM  

Rock Krenn: lindalouwho: JammerJim: Trocadero: As pointed out in other articles, fighting for streaming money doesn't explain the strikes at John Deere, Kellogg's, etc, nor the "great resignation."

And why should it? Look, when you get down to it, almost all strikes boil down to compensation and working conditions. TFA is about one union and how those standard concerns in this case relate to the changes streaming has brought to Hollywood.

There haven't been this many strikes since the 1970s, I think it's awesome. Too many workers have been getting screwed for way too long.


I can't believe it took this long.

[Fark user image 756x519]


...considering that the point where profits and median wages diverged was about when Ronnie crushed the air traffic controllers and showed big business how to break unions, I'm not surprised it took this long.
 
2021-10-17 11:39:59 AM  

Trocadero: And they have deal.
https://www.latimes.com/entertainment-​arts/business/story/2021-10-16/iatse-s​trike-deal-studios-amptp-contract-holl​ywood-labor


Wow, a pay raise that's retroactive?
Very nice.
 
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