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(CBS News)   Reigning Ohio hide-n-seek champion gives up the crown: SUV containing mother and two children missing since 2002 pulled from river in Indiana   (cbsnews.com) divider line
    More: Sad, Indiana, Ohio, Ohio River, Kentucky, Midwestern United States, Mississippi River, Louisville, Kentucky, Illinois  
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3064 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Oct 2021 at 3:25 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



46 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-10-16 3:28:36 AM  
Yikes
 
2021-10-16 3:40:20 AM  
Sweet Jeebus! At least she left a note.
 
2021-10-16 3:53:35 AM  
Isn't Jesus still the champ?
 
2021-10-16 4:05:28 AM  
that is kind of a grim headline considering the ages of her kids. meanwhile CNN keeps going on about that white girl who was clearly strangled by her boyfriend as if she were a missing airliner from Indonesia.

/welcome to fark
 
2021-10-16 4:12:49 AM  
Burial at sea always sounds so romantic and enchanting.
 
2021-10-16 4:33:11 AM  
Note: "I am going to drive into the Ohio River."
Last seen: By a cop, at a boat RAMP TO THE OHIO RIVER. 
Police, twenty years later: "She drove into the river."

Yes, fifty feet is very deep, the water is murky, and the river current may have moved the SUV some. But divers are a thing that exists. It doesn't sound to me like they looked hard enough at all, twenty years ago, given the note and the boat ramp siting.
 
2021-10-16 4:57:12 AM  

Biscuit Tin: Note: "I am going to drive into the Ohio River."
Last seen: By a cop, at a boat RAMP TO THE OHIO RIVER. 
Police, twenty years later: "She drove into the river."

Yes, fifty feet is very deep, the water is murky, and the river current may have moved the SUV some. But divers are a thing that exists. It doesn't sound to me like they looked hard enough at all, twenty years ago, given the note and the boat ramp siting.


She wasn't a pretty white lady so no1curr. That's why it took so long.

Seriously though it's tragic. I wonder what drove her to do that. Other than the suv, i mean. The article is a little light on details and there's no mention of family or an estranged husband or anything. Speculation time:
She was imported by a shiatty white guy who kept her isolated and otherwise abused her but she finally left him. Unfortunately he was moderately wealthy and connected so he made her life hell until, since she couldn't leave the country with the kids and had no one else for support, she chose the permanent exit partially to escape her situation but also to punish him (by taking the kids with).
 
2021-10-16 5:07:48 AM  

Biscuit Tin: Note: "I am going to drive into the Ohio River."
Last seen: By a cop, at a boat RAMP TO THE OHIO RIVER.
Police, twenty years later: "She drove into the river."

Yes, fifty feet is very deep, the water is murky, and the river current may have moved the SUV some. But divers are a thing that exists. It doesn't sound to me like they looked hard enough at all, twenty years ago, given the note and the boat ramp siting.


Sonar scans found this vehicle as well as two others. If only they'd had sonar scanning technology back in...uh...2002?
 
2021-10-16 5:33:03 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

Um ...
 
2021-10-16 5:49:05 AM  
4-year-old daughter, Kristina, and 3-year-old son, John

Just right for understanding the situation while being completely powerless to change it.
 
2021-10-16 6:10:09 AM  
The Pathfinder was power-washed and sold by a used car dealer for $5,000 over KBB
 
2021-10-16 6:13:40 AM  
external-content.duckduckgo.comView Full Size
 
2021-10-16 6:38:57 AM  
What some people won't do to get out of Ohio.
 
2021-10-16 6:47:32 AM  

Biscuit Tin: Note: "I am going to drive into the Ohio River."
Last seen: By a cop, at a boat RAMP TO THE OHIO RIVER.
Police, twenty years later: "She drove into the river."

Yes, fifty feet is very deep, the water is murky, and the river current may have moved the SUV some. But divers are a thing that exists. It doesn't sound to me like they looked hard enough at all, twenty years ago, given the note and the boat ramp siting.


Maybe there was no family to continue asking cops what happened. If no one asks, it probably just went cold.
 
2021-10-16 7:16:50 AM  
Came for a Susan Smith reference. Very disappoint.
 
2021-10-16 7:19:38 AM  
It's not hide-and-seek unless everyone is playing. If the bigger kids have the littler kids hide and then leave them there while they go off and do something else that's called ditch.
 
2021-10-16 8:10:23 AM  
Unfortunately this kind of disappearance and delayed discovery is not uncommon.  There's even a dive team that travels the country taking up these cold cases and sometimes finding folks who the police have stopped actively searching for.

Check out the "Adventures With Purpose" YouTube channel.
 
2021-10-16 8:12:33 AM  
That little boy couldn't think his way out? JFC.
 
2021-10-16 8:34:28 AM  

thealgorerhythm: [Fark user image 425x107]
Um ...


Explains why local water tastes like it has a touch of transmission fluid.
 
2021-10-16 9:37:17 AM  
"This has been a case we've actively pursued for many years. We did a cold case on it because of the anniversary. I'm happy for the family that we'll be able to, hopefully, give some closure," Macaluso said.

Bullshiat. You ignored it for 20 years because it wasn't a blonde white woman and reopened due to the anniversary publicity.
 
2021-10-16 9:51:07 AM  
Why do all the hide and seek champions keep being found dead?
 
2021-10-16 10:13:32 AM  

Biscuit Tin: Note: "I am going to drive into the Ohio River."
Last seen: By a cop, at a boat RAMP TO THE OHIO RIVER. 
Police, twenty years later: "She drove into the river."

Yes, fifty feet is very deep, the water is murky, and the river current may have moved the SUV some. But divers are a thing that exists. It doesn't sound to me like they looked hard enough at all, twenty years ago, given the note and the boat ramp siting.


Side scan radar, which was used to locate the vehicle, and which found two other vehicles, existed back in 2002. They could have scanned the river back then.
 
2021-10-16 10:18:04 AM  
I hope Dam Son is OK.
 
2021-10-16 10:43:17 AM  

Mock26: Biscuit Tin: Note: "I am going to drive into the Ohio River."
Last seen: By a cop, at a boat RAMP TO THE OHIO RIVER. 
Police, twenty years later: "She drove into the river."

Yes, fifty feet is very deep, the water is murky, and the river current may have moved the SUV some. But divers are a thing that exists. It doesn't sound to me like they looked hard enough at all, twenty years ago, given the note and the boat ramp siting.

Side scan radar, which was used to locate the vehicle, and which found two other vehicles, existed back in 2002. They could have scanned the river back then.


Do you know for a fact they didn't?
 
2021-10-16 10:46:03 AM  
Monty Python FC 35. - Bújócska olimpiai döntő (The Olympic Hide-and-seek Final)
Youtube 2sqTmhB0BNQ
 
2021-10-16 11:07:12 AM  

caljar: Mock26: Biscuit Tin: Note: "I am going to drive into the Ohio River."
Last seen: By a cop, at a boat RAMP TO THE OHIO RIVER. 
Police, twenty years later: "She drove into the river."

Yes, fifty feet is very deep, the water is murky, and the river current may have moved the SUV some. But divers are a thing that exists. It doesn't sound to me like they looked hard enough at all, twenty years ago, given the note and the boat ramp siting.

Side scan radar, which was used to locate the vehicle, and which found two other vehicles, existed back in 2002. They could have scanned the river back then.

Do you know for a fact they didn't?


Bootlicker.
 
2021-10-16 11:08:51 AM  
The cold case archive states it was assumed she ran away with the children and may have left the country. And if you think you see them, "approach with caution".
 
2021-10-16 11:09:53 AM  

caljar: Mock26: Biscuit Tin: Note: "I am going to drive into the Ohio River."
Last seen: By a cop, at a boat RAMP TO THE OHIO RIVER. 
Police, twenty years later: "She drove into the river."

Yes, fifty feet is very deep, the water is murky, and the river current may have moved the SUV some. But divers are a thing that exists. It doesn't sound to me like they looked hard enough at all, twenty years ago, given the note and the boat ramp siting.

Side scan radar, which was used to locate the vehicle, and which found two other vehicles, existed back in 2002. They could have scanned the river back then.

Do you know for a fact they didn't?


Now I know who funnied my post.
 
TWX
2021-10-16 11:14:06 AM  

Biscuit Tin: Note: "I am going to drive into the Ohio River."
Last seen: By a cop, at a boat RAMP TO THE OHIO RIVER. 
Police, twenty years later: "She drove into the river."

Yes, fifty feet is very deep, the water is murky, and the river current may have moved the SUV some. But divers are a thing that exists. It doesn't sound to me like they looked hard enough at all, twenty years ago, given the note and the boat ramp siting.


HereNorThere: Unfortunately this kind of disappearance and delayed discovery is not uncommon.  There's even a dive team that travels the country taking up these cold cases and sometimes finding folks who the police have stopped actively searching for.

Check out the "Adventures With Purpose" YouTube channel.


Yeah, I was going to recommend looking into them.  TFA doesn't really do a good job of indicating if the police divers found the vehicle, or if an independent team like this group found it and alerted law enforcement to it.

Sometimes I wonder if we need our governments to establish prizes for finding previously unknown submerged or lost vehicles.  Doesn't have to be a lot, something like $5000 per vehicle, so that rank amateurs may not be inclined to risk themselves too much, but where organized teams can recoup their costs for any given dive, particularly when they find multiple vehicles in the same spot.
 
2021-10-16 11:28:39 AM  

Biscuit Tin: Note: "I am going to drive into the Ohio River."
Last seen: By a cop, at a boat RAMP TO THE OHIO RIVER. 
Police, twenty years later: "She drove into the river."

Yes, fifty feet is very deep, the water is murky, and the river current may have moved the SUV some. But divers are a thing that exists. It doesn't sound to me like they looked hard enough at all, twenty years ago, given the note and the boat ramp siting.


A canoe and a large magnet on the end of the rope.  "Mow the lawn" for a few hours and you're bound to find something.

Wouldn't be surprised of some consumer-grade fish finders at that time could have located something as large as a car.
 
2021-10-16 11:36:08 AM  

TWX: Sometimes I wonder if we need our governments to establish prizes for finding previously unknown submerged or lost vehicles.  Doesn't have to be a lot, something like $5000 per vehicle, so that rank amateurs may not be inclined to risk themselves too much, but where organized teams can recoup their costs for any given dive, particularly when they find multiple vehicles in the same spot.


If your National Guard unit has a Search & Rescue team, I'd bet they'd like to spend those summer weekends, and their 2-weeks-a-year duty on searches like this.  It's real life and serves a purpose.  Better than them just sitting around the NG building for the weekend until some higher-up sends them off on some publicity mission (that usually involves trying to locate a missing white woman).
 
TWX
2021-10-16 11:39:59 AM  

indy_kid: TWX: Sometimes I wonder if we need our governments to establish prizes for finding previously unknown submerged or lost vehicles.  Doesn't have to be a lot, something like $5000 per vehicle, so that rank amateurs may not be inclined to risk themselves too much, but where organized teams can recoup their costs for any given dive, particularly when they find multiple vehicles in the same spot.

If your National Guard unit has a Search & Rescue team, I'd bet they'd like to spend those summer weekends, and their 2-weeks-a-year duty on searches like this.  It's real life and serves a purpose.  Better than them just sitting around the NG building for the weekend until some higher-up sends them off on some publicity mission (that usually involves trying to locate a missing white woman).


My guess is that whomever is in charge of the budget for the NG unit would complain that it costs too much.
 
2021-10-16 11:55:55 AM  

Biscuit Tin: Note: "I am going to drive into the Ohio River."
Last seen: By a cop, at a boat RAMP TO THE OHIO RIVER. 
Police, twenty years later: "She drove into the river."

Yes, fifty feet is very deep, the water is murky, and the river current may have moved the SUV some. But divers are a thing that exists. It doesn't sound to me like they looked hard enough at all, twenty years ago, given the note and the boat ramp siting.


They looked before, they didn't find it.  Sidescan sonar is better than a diver in murky water.
 
2021-10-16 12:31:27 PM  

indy_kid: TWX: Sometimes I wonder if we need our governments to establish prizes for finding previously unknown submerged or lost vehicles.  Doesn't have to be a lot, something like $5000 per vehicle, so that rank amateurs may not be inclined to risk themselves too much, but where organized teams can recoup their costs for any given dive, particularly when they find multiple vehicles in the same spot.

If your National Guard unit has a Search & Rescue team, I'd bet they'd like to spend those summer weekends, and their 2-weeks-a-year duty on searches like this.  It's real life and serves a purpose.  Better than them just sitting around the NG building for the weekend until some higher-up sends them off on some publicity mission (that usually involves trying to locate a missing white woman).


Sonar systems are way better than divers when looking for ANYTHING under water.

I operate side-scan systems that can see fishing line in zero viz water from 100m away.

There are not a lot of these types of systems available for hire commercially, and they are not cheap to buy. But more state PDs should have contracts with sonar search and recovery companies to handle stuff like this.
 
2021-10-16 12:39:42 PM  

Stud Gerbil: Burial at sea always sounds so romantic and enchanting.


Not for everyone.

th.bing.comView Full Size


/now fish food.  Good riddance.
 
2021-10-16 1:26:43 PM  
Looks like absolutely no one read the article. They found the SUV, but was not able to determine if the bodies were inside at the time.

Probably have to sift through the silt.
 
2021-10-16 1:41:40 PM  

HereNorThere: Unfortunately this kind of disappearance and delayed discovery is not uncommon.  There's even a dive team that travels the country taking up these cold cases and sometimes finding folks who the police have stopped actively searching for.

Check out the "Adventures With Purpose" YouTube channel.


If you are the one who recommended that channel about two weeks ago in another thread - thank you!  I binge watched a lot of their videos after it was mentioned.  Very good stuff - sucks that Sam and Kevin left recently.  I enjoyed the videos more when they were there.
 
2021-10-16 1:54:01 PM  

caljar: Mock26: Biscuit Tin: Note: "I am going to drive into the Ohio River."
Last seen: By a cop, at a boat RAMP TO THE OHIO RIVER.
Police, twenty years later: "She drove into the river."

Yes, fifty feet is very deep, the water is murky, and the river current may have moved the SUV some. But divers are a thing that exists. It doesn't sound to me like they looked hard enough at all, twenty years ago, given the note and the boat ramp siting.

Side scan radar, which was used to locate the vehicle, and which found two other vehicles, existed back in 2002. They could have scanned the river back then.

Do you know for a fact they didn't?


Wouldn't that just prove out their incompetence even more if they had?
 
2021-10-16 1:55:50 PM  

sensitive yet dangerous: Biscuit Tin: Note: "I am going to drive into the Ohio River."
Last seen: By a cop, at a boat RAMP TO THE OHIO RIVER. 
Police, twenty years later: "She drove into the river."

Yes, fifty feet is very deep, the water is murky, and the river current may have moved the SUV some. But divers are a thing that exists. It doesn't sound to me like they looked hard enough at all, twenty years ago, given the note and the boat ramp siting.

She wasn't a pretty white lady so no1curr. That's why it took so long.

Seriously though it's tragic. I wonder what drove her to do that. ...


"I see what you did there" or "too soon", your pick.
 
2021-10-16 2:14:20 PM  

thealgorerhythm: [Fark user image image 425x107]
Um ...


What, you've never dropped something between the seat cushions, dug in, and came up with other stuff?
 
TWX
2021-10-16 2:19:03 PM  

Someone Else's Alt: indy_kid: TWX: Sometimes I wonder if we need our governments to establish prizes for finding previously unknown submerged or lost vehicles.  Doesn't have to be a lot, something like $5000 per vehicle, so that rank amateurs may not be inclined to risk themselves too much, but where organized teams can recoup their costs for any given dive, particularly when they find multiple vehicles in the same spot.

If your National Guard unit has a Search & Rescue team, I'd bet they'd like to spend those summer weekends, and their 2-weeks-a-year duty on searches like this.  It's real life and serves a purpose.  Better than them just sitting around the NG building for the weekend until some higher-up sends them off on some publicity mission (that usually involves trying to locate a missing white woman).

Sonar systems are way better than divers when looking for ANYTHING under water.

I operate side-scan systems that can see fishing line in zero viz water from 100m away.

There are not a lot of these types of systems available for hire commercially, and they are not cheap to buy. But more state PDs should have contracts with sonar search and recovery companies to handle stuff like this.


Well yeah, just thinking to my own Adventures with Government Procurement, I end up buying network access switches that are $8000 a pop, sometimes a telco closet for a sufficiently large building may have a dozen of these.  Most people would never even consider spending nearly a hundred thousand dollars for just access switches, but for an institutional purchase, be it government or business, this is not a big deal.

A side-scanning sonar system might be too expensive for most private individuals to even consider purchasing, but if a sufficiently-large city or county want to equip an S&R team with them, or if a state wants to have such a team, then the cost may well be reasonable if the team uses the equipment often enough and actually produces results.  I can only assume that when states' highway departments build roads that they had surveyed to figure out where the risk of cars going into rivers or lakes were at higher risk, it shouldn't be a big deal for a search and rescue team to define a schedule for doing sweeps of these sorts of places, along with boat ramps and other places that cars can get close to bodies of water.  When there are reports of missing persons or reports of places that may contain something, interrupt the schedule to go do those specific jobs, kind of like how these hobbyist teams do it.

Frankly governments and police departments should feel embarassed by how many of these missing persons cases are solved by hobbyists, even if those hobbyists are professionally equipped and trained.  In several cases the hobbyists have searched places that the police claimed to have searched and somehow overlooked the vehicle sitting in the bottom of the river or lake, even when the vehicle was still new and shiny.  These hobbyists are finding them after they've sat there for years and are covered up by sediment and biological deposits.
 
2021-10-16 2:21:01 PM  

Tenga: Came for a Susan Smith reference. Very disappoint.


Are you saying a black guy is responsible for this??
 
2021-10-16 4:37:08 PM  
I'm aquatinted with someone from that family and I'm super sad to hear this. He had hoped for a long time kids would be found alive
 
2021-10-16 5:06:12 PM  

Biscuit Tin: Note: "I am going to drive into the Ohio River."
Last seen: By a cop, at a boat RAMP TO THE OHIO RIVER. 
Police, twenty years later: "She drove into the river."

Yes, fifty feet is very deep, the water is murky, and the river current may have moved the SUV some. But divers are a thing that exists. It doesn't sound to me like they looked hard enough at all, twenty years ago, given the note and the boat ramp siting.


have you ever dove in a river?  the water's basically opaque and there's catfish down there big as a man. you'd be hard pressed to find something you knew the exact location of, let alone an unknown one
 
2021-10-16 5:55:36 PM  

TWX: Someone Else's Alt: indy_kid: TWX: Sometimes I wonder if we need our governments to establish prizes for finding previously unknown submerged or lost vehicles.  Doesn't have to be a lot, something like $5000 per vehicle, so that rank amateurs may not be inclined to risk themselves too much, but where organized teams can recoup their costs for any given dive, particularly when they find multiple vehicles in the same spot.

If your National Guard unit has a Search & Rescue team, I'd bet they'd like to spend those summer weekends, and their 2-weeks-a-year duty on searches like this.  It's real life and serves a purpose.  Better than them just sitting around the NG building for the weekend until some higher-up sends them off on some publicity mission (that usually involves trying to locate a missing white woman).

Sonar systems are way better than divers when looking for ANYTHING under water.

I operate side-scan systems that can see fishing line in zero viz water from 100m away.

There are not a lot of these types of systems available for hire commercially, and they are not cheap to buy. But more state PDs should have contracts with sonar search and recovery companies to handle stuff like this.

Well yeah, just thinking to my own Adventures with Government Procurement, I end up buying network access switches that are $8000 a pop, sometimes a telco closet for a sufficiently large building may have a dozen of these.  Most people would never even consider spending nearly a hundred thousand dollars for just access switches, but for an institutional purchase, be it government or business, this is not a big deal.

A side-scanning sonar system might be too expensive for most private individuals to even consider purchasing, but if a sufficiently-large city or county want to equip an S&R team with them, or if a state wants to have such a team, then the cost may well be reasonable if the team uses the equipment often enough and actually produces results.  I can only assume that ...


Yep to all above.
 
2021-10-16 11:25:15 PM  
Still trying to determine if the mother and children were in the car
 
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