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(Nintendo Life)   Metroid developers say the credits are dreadful   (nintendolife.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, 2006 singles, Game, Credit, Lyn Collins, Video game developer, Woo! Yeah!, game's release, game's credits  
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1055 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 14 Oct 2021 at 8:37 PM (30 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



16 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-10-14 8:52:38 PM  
Did they hire my old Prudential project manager?

3" thick project plan. Seven pages listing everyone associated with the project.

Except the programmers.

Oh, and the 21 month plan allowed for a 30-day "and then a miracle occurs" coding window.

People were angry at me for leaving.

A few months later the entire 110-person division was axed.
 
2021-10-14 8:53:53 PM  
My old company would strip you of your official title, but list you as "Additional Art", even if you left a week or so before the project wrapped.

I always found that incredibly petty. Credit where credit is due is a simple concept.

And then they went out of business.
 
2021-10-14 9:11:17 PM  
My company doesn't put my name on its products either.
 
2021-10-14 9:18:40 PM  
 
2021-10-14 9:23:51 PM  
When an F150 rolls off the line, my name is nowhere to be found.  Saddens me, that.
 
2021-10-14 9:37:06 PM  
And yet I burn my initials into one patient's liver and suddenly I'm the bad guy!
 
2021-10-14 10:30:10 PM  
If the company won't give you your credit, take it without their knowledge.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-10-14 11:20:59 PM  
i.dailymail.co.ukView Full Size

They said it. They meant it. They stole your mother's credit.
 
2021-10-15 8:10:38 AM  
why do they suck? is it not a high res version of this?

4.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size
 
2021-10-15 8:18:02 AM  
Game companies are terrible.
 
2021-10-15 8:55:29 AM  

khitsicker: why do they suck? is it not a high res version of this?

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 850x476]


I hadn't thought about that...  Is it, actually? In retrospect, having a "finish the game quicker to undress the heroine" feature was already weird in the '80s and '90s. I really don't think that would fly nowadays.
 
2021-10-15 11:09:49 AM  
Why should putting eleven months of hard work into a project rather than twelve mean that you don't receive credit for your efforts, potentially spoiling future career opportunities?

Because at some point, it's ridiculous. And no one will agree on that line. 11mo out of 4 years yes? 10mo no? What about the intern that put in a solid 3 months?

They defined the line in the sand as 25% of the project, you didn't work on the game for even a quarter of its life cycle.

I would argue a much better line of question is what constitutes work on the game and his much of the life cycle is applicable. Are they making art assets for 4 years? Dev? Marketing? Testing? Distribution?

Seems like with a % policy like that, odds are good that whole teams have a harder chance to show up merely because of the lifecycle timeline. Not all teams, let alone individuals, are necessary from day one through release.

The other potentially interesting question to me would be "work". Does marketing belong in credits? Management? Interns?

Or, maybe... Why should anyone? It's any single individual's contribution valuable enough that they should be publicly credited? Probably. But most? All? I doubt it. Maybe we don't need lists of hundreds of people. Or thousands.

Big budget movie and video game credits screens are a joke these days. They can play for 15 or 20 minutes to list out people... When a small handful should be credited for their valuable contributions. SAG for example will require a TV show or movie to credit across who filmed for 2 days, but their scenes were cut. They have 0 appreciable impact on the final product. They were there for .03% of the process. They got paid either way.

Maybe credits and the whole concept is archaic, and a joke, both to the company producing the show, movie, or game... And the consumer. If your work made it in, point it out to your loved ones and move on.
 
2021-10-15 12:20:25 PM  
Taking out that speedy, yellow bastard is so gotdamn gratifying.
 
2021-10-15 1:41:14 PM  

MagicBoris: khitsicker: why do they suck? is it not a high res version of this?

[4.bp.blogspot.com image 850x476]

I hadn't thought about that...  Is it, actually? In retrospect, having a "finish the game quicker to undress the heroine" feature was already weird in the '80s and '90s. I really don't think that would fly nowadays.


The last few games have either just put her in the Zero Suit or shown her in her civilian gear, which is spacefuture hotpants and a halter top, and Nintendo's idea of the Zero Suit isn't anything like how fanartists draw it
 
2021-10-15 2:29:52 PM  
I knew a guy who loved downloading pirated movies - but he would get so angry when bootleggers cut off the credits. He was so outraged the thief denied those artists the credit for their work. As an aspiring filmmaker, I would gently remind him that the filmmaker should get paid as well, but he simply said that he believed copyright ownership was theft. Or some nonsense like that.

But he was outraged they didn't get "exposure".
 
2021-10-15 9:44:37 PM  

Quantumbunny: Or, maybe... Why should anyone? It's any single individual's contribution valuable enough that they should be publicly credited? Probably. But most? All? I doubt it. Maybe we don't need lists of hundreds of people. Or thousands.


They could always go the Ubisoft route, and list anyone who worked on the project, worked at a company affiliated with the project, or hell, anybody who even walked by the building. So what if the credit roll is longer than an hour?
 
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