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(NPR)   Give me salt or give me death   (npr.org) divider line
    More: Interesting, Sodium, Salt, new sodium, Food, food companies, Americans' sodium intake, Sodium chloride, much sodium  
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1080 clicks; posted to Food » on 13 Oct 2021 at 5:20 PM (8 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-10-13 3:37:19 PM  
Considering how much some people like cup noodles this is not going to work.
 
2021-10-13 4:21:20 PM  
food companies are already working to reduce sodium "by offering a variety of products to meet consumer demands - lower sodium, reduced sodium, lightly salted, and no salt options," according to a news release

Screw the meaningless categories. If they were serious, food companies would put some sort of SodiumGuide on their packaging so consumers could make informed decisions. But that would be the wrong kind of capitalism.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-10-13 5:51:19 PM  

common sense is an oxymoron: food companies are already working to reduce sodium "by offering a variety of products to meet consumer demands - lower sodium, reduced sodium, lightly salted, and no salt options," according to a news release

Screw the meaningless categories. If they were serious, food companies would put some sort of SodiumGuide on their packaging so consumers could make informed decisions. But that would be the wrong kind of capitalism.

[Fark user image 850x1163]


Difficulty: customers would still have to *read* the guides.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-10-13 5:52:57 PM  
Can we start restricting other things that might kill you, too?

So that the people with ODD (Oppositional Defiant Disorder) will do it more in protest, the anti-vax, anti-mask folks kill themselves faster, and we can get to some semblance of normal.

Maybe we can outlaw snorting cyanide, or making toothpicks from pressure treated wood.
 
2021-10-13 5:59:59 PM  
Is potassium salt any good? Can we just get companies to start replacing half their salt with potassium salt? The price between the 2 at the store isn't very great.
 
2021-10-13 6:09:28 PM  
"New research shows that for the vast majority of individuals, sodium consumption does not increase health risks except for those who eat more than five grams a day, the equivalent of 2.5 teaspoons of salt. "

New, as in 2018 The article notes that only the Chinese generally hit that level.

Apparently, our kidneys have evolved to handle a wide range of salt intake.  Mine manage to just barely keep me above the minimum of the normal range (Na and K), despite one of my hypertension meds being a diuretic and the other supposedly makes your body retain potassium.  I even use lite salt.
 
2021-10-13 6:10:16 PM  

skyotter: common sense is an oxymoron: food companies are already working to reduce sodium "by offering a variety of products to meet consumer demands - lower sodium, reduced sodium, lightly salted, and no salt options," according to a news release

Screw the meaningless categories. If they were serious, food companies would put some sort of SodiumGuide on their packaging so consumers could make informed decisions. But that would be the wrong kind of capitalism.

[Fark user image 850x1163]

Difficulty: customers would still have to *read* ALL the guides.
[Fark user image 425x283]


Fixed. The raw numbers aren't a whole lot better than the marketing labels without some way to compare them.
 
2021-10-13 6:14:51 PM  
That's crackers. Pretzel logic even. Obviously has a chip on her shoulder.
 
2021-10-13 6:17:13 PM  

skyotter: common sense is an oxymoron: food companies are already working to reduce sodium "by offering a variety of products to meet consumer demands - lower sodium, reduced sodium, lightly salted, and no salt options," according to a news release

Screw the meaningless categories. If they were serious, food companies would put some sort of SodiumGuide on their packaging so consumers could make informed decisions. But that would be the wrong kind of capitalism.

[Fark user image 850x1163]

Difficulty: customers would still have to *read* the guides.
[Fark user image image 425x283]


aw c'mon, we all know reading is fumble-mental.
 
2021-10-13 6:21:24 PM  
I use entirely too much salt, to the point where if I'm around people I consciously limit my intake for fear of embarrassment.  I'm 40, probably should limit it for my health.

That being said, maybe due to exercising daily and sweating excess out I have no problems with blood pressure (at least the couple times a year I test myself at random / go to the dr) or water retention, maybe its not a big deal.

probably the biggest deal is high salt & sedentary, you don't get it out of your system, causes problems?
 
2021-10-13 6:26:41 PM  
15 years ago, I had a kidney stone. Some medical professional told me that salted snacks increase your chance of a 2nd stone. So, I cut out all salted snacks. I had a lengthy phone conversation last week with a doctor friend whom I hadn't seen because of COVID and I mentioned how I'd cut out salted snacks. Salt doesn't cause kidney stones, he said. I felt like Humphrey Bogart watching gold dust blow away in Treasure of Sierra Madre.

Now, I suspect that under the influence of pain killers that I'd dreamed the whole thing.
 
2021-10-13 6:50:28 PM  

jzeeb: Is potassium salt any good? Can we just get companies to start replacing half their salt with potassium salt? The price between the 2 at the store isn't very great.


I've used it. I don't mind it. It doesn't have a lot of fans on this tab.
 
2021-10-13 6:53:09 PM  

yakmans_dad: 15 years ago, I had a kidney stone. Some medical professional told me that salted snacks increase your chance of a 2nd stone. So, I cut out all salted snacks. I had a lengthy phone conversation last week with a doctor friend whom I hadn't seen because of COVID and I mentioned how I'd cut out salted snacks. Salt doesn't cause kidney stones, he said. I felt like Humphrey Bogart watching gold dust blow away in Treasure of Sierra Madre.

Now, I suspect that under the influence of pain killers that I'd dreamed the whole thing.


10-15 years ago I had one (thank-glob, first and only) - at the time I was likely subsistence-ing on literally nothing other than sashimi and vodak - so it maybe makes a weird sort of sense?

I just know I never want to feel that particular specific agony anytime again in my lifetime, lol. and this is coming from a "pain don't hurt" kinda guy - shot the fark up and bleeding out on a cold steel saltwater deck? meh and double-meh! but kidney-stone? ogod please kill me right now please please please.

but the whole caffeine/fat/salt/etc. is now good for you no now it's bad for you no now it's good for you no wait it's bad for you again... man, I try to keep up and so does my doctorb, but...?
 
2021-10-13 6:57:00 PM  

fasahd: jzeeb: Is potassium salt any good? Can we just get companies to start replacing half their salt with potassium salt? The price between the 2 at the store isn't very great.

I've used it. I don't mind it. It doesn't have a lot of fans on this tab.


we definitely don't seem to much talk about it here, that's for sure.

I ain't mind it, think it tastes just fine. might even use it more, were the stuff prevalent/inexpensive as sodium.

plus I've said a brazillion times before and likely will again: I like buying spice mixes sans-salt. because (a.) I'm a cheapskate who already owns salt, and (2.) I like being in control of sodium not even for health reasons but just for exact flavor I want to hit.
 
2021-10-13 7:11:14 PM  
Been cutting back on salt lately . It's interesting when you realize how much salt is already in your food already .
 
151 [OhFark]
2021-10-13 7:14:37 PM  
Whenever I make a big batch of something at work, I have to have at least one other person taste it besides me to adjust salt content, because I farking love salt, and if I seasoned it to my preference, most people I serve it to would wither up and die after the first bite.

I should probably chill out on that.
 
2021-10-13 7:25:18 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-10-13 7:31:15 PM  

phedex: I use entirely too much salt, to the point where if I'm around people I consciously limit my intake for fear of embarrassment.  I'm 40, probably should limit it for my health.

That being said, maybe due to exercising daily and sweating excess out I have no problems with blood pressure (at least the couple times a year I test myself at random / go to the dr) or water retention, maybe its not a big deal.

probably the biggest deal is high salt & sedentary, you don't get it out of your system, causes problems?


just wait until you're in your 50's.....
 
2021-10-13 7:40:53 PM  

151: Whenever I make a big batch of something at work, I have to have at least one other person taste it besides me to adjust salt content, because I farking love salt, and if I seasoned it to my preference, most people I serve it to would wither up and die after the first bite.

I should probably chill out on that.


I totally get the overton-window/beyond-biofeedback thin​g - whenever my Auntie would go out to a restaurant with us, she'd always have like a literal bandolier of spices and black-salt strapped under her salwar-kameez. I don't mean that in any pejorative sense, she simply wanted what she was used to - ditto to what sort of cooking she had made her own family, and even me, used to.
 
2021-10-13 7:43:14 PM  

yakmans_dad: 15 years ago, I had a kidney stone. Some medical professional told me that salted snacks increase your chance of a 2nd stone. So, I cut out all salted snacks. I had a lengthy phone conversation last week with a doctor friend whom I hadn't seen because of COVID and I mentioned how I'd cut out salted snacks. Salt doesn't cause kidney stones, he said. I felt like Humphrey Bogart watching gold dust blow away in Treasure of Sierra Madre.

Now, I suspect that under the influence of pain killers that I'd dreamed the whole thing.


Nowadays, since there are several types of kidney stones, they will try and test for the type of stones you are at risk for to help you modify your diet.
 
151 [OhFark]
2021-10-13 7:57:51 PM  

tintar: 151: Whenever I make a big batch of something at work, I have to have at least one other person taste it besides me to adjust salt content, because I farking love salt, and if I seasoned it to my preference, most people I serve it to would wither up and die after the first bite.

I should probably chill out on that.

I totally get the overton-window/beyond-biofeedback thin​g - whenever my Auntie would go out to a restaurant with us, she'd always have like a literal bandolier of spices and black-salt strapped under her salwar-kameez. I don't mean that in any pejorative sense, she simply wanted what she was used to - ditto to what sort of cooking she had made her own family, and even me, used to.


My dad was pretty kinda the same way when we'd go out to eat. And I get pretty much all of my eating habits from him. He'd just shake half the salt shaker on whatever the hell he ordered, salad, fries, pasta, whatever. Because that's how his mom seasoned stuff.

A few months ago we went out to eat and he's currently very deep in Alzheimer's and dementia, and I had to literally put the salt shaker on the table next to us, because he kept forgetting he already drowned his salad in salt. I had to tell him 3 times "they're out of salt, there's a national shortage" before he finally gave up and just ate it.

/He had a quadruple bypass when I was 17
//I should definitely chill out with salt
 
2021-10-13 8:05:42 PM  
I started reducing my salt way back in the late 1970's in an attempt to manage bad PMS. I will go through a 2 lb box of kosher salt every 5 years or so (and that includes canning pickles and sauerkraut). I follow recipes when baking but do not add salt when cooking. I have often sent food back in restaurants because it was too salty (soups are especially bad). It is amazing how much you can taste the food when it is not over salted*. I have tried some of the emergency/backpacking foods and so many of them are so salty they are inedible.

*Except popcorn. Popcorn needs to be loaded with salt and butter.
 
2021-10-13 8:06:10 PM  

jzeeb: Is potassium salt any good? Can we just get companies to start replacing half their salt with potassium salt? The price between the 2 at the store isn't very great.


I can't tell the difference. But I never put salt on/in anything. I'm more of a garlic and pepper type.
 
2021-10-13 8:28:10 PM  

catmandu: I started reducing my salt way back in the late 1970's in an attempt to manage bad PMS. I will go through a 2 lb box of kosher salt every 5 years or so (and that includes canning pickles and sauerkraut). I follow recipes when baking but do not add salt when cooking. I have often sent food back in restaurants because it was too salty (soups are especially bad). It is amazing how much you can taste the food when it is not over salted*. I have tried some of the emergency/backpacking foods and so many of them are so salty they are inedible.

*Except popcorn. Popcorn needs to be loaded with salt and butter.


I pretty much stopped adding salt to my cooking too.  And I usually make everything rather than order from restaurants or get premade food.  Now I notice when things are even a little salty.  I like salt, and I'll add salt to certain things (like soup lol) but restaurants overdo it a lot.
 
2021-10-13 8:29:26 PM  
There's salt in frozen chicken. Can't escape it
 
2021-10-13 8:32:13 PM  
Once again, this is a burden of the poor. If you have the luxury of time and resources, you can enjoy healthy, slow food that you cook and season well enough. If you are forced into the ramen section, a corporate attorney is overseeing your preserving salt bath of death. With maybe a touch of sodium benzoate or maybe pyroacid whatever it is.

I tried a McDonald's chicken sandwich after years of cooking for myself. That thing was a salt lick.
 
2021-10-13 8:43:10 PM  

151: My dad was pretty kinda the same way when we'd go out to eat. And I get pretty much all of my eating habits from him. He'd just shake half the salt shaker on whatever the hell he ordered, salad, fries, pasta, whatever. Because that's how his mom seasoned stuff.

A few months ago we went out to eat and he's currently very deep in Alzheimer's and dementia, and I had to literally put the salt shaker on the table next to us, because he kept forgetting he already drowned his salad in salt. I had to tell him 3 times "they're out of salt, there's a national shortage" before he finally gave up and just ate it.

/He had a quadruple bypass when I was 17
//I should definitely chill out with salt


I... yeah, I actually totally get that.

whatever I cook - my wife, her dad, her mom, are instantly poised to shower it with table salt or even ketchup. it makes me sad/die-a-little-inside, "have you even tasted it yet"

I'm not judging them (Narrator: ok, well, sure, still judging, but... not too much judgment) because we all are who we are. we like what we like.

really sorry to hear that news about your dad. mine's 71 and... ok, so, when I was a kid my mom had zero idea how to cook (not her fault, just culture of the 70s/80s) and so he is not only used to but loves all food to be burnt. I kid you not. he was visiting us this past weekend for my wife's birthday and literally every breakfast I made?
- french toast. burnt.
- ham. burnt.
- scrambled eggs. burnt.
- hash browns. burnt.
- turkey bacon. burnt.
- eggs in frames. burnt.
- toast&butter. oh you better believe that's a paddlin' burnt.

I had to try pretty hard to overcook and burn every of the things!

me, I like everything to be maillard as the day is long and I love "burnt" stuff, but this man, yeah... he loves it black as the devil's underwear?
 
2021-10-13 8:51:19 PM  

tintar: 151: My dad was pretty kinda the same way when we'd go out to eat. And I get pretty much all of my eating habits from him. He'd just shake half the salt shaker on whatever the hell he ordered, salad, fries, pasta, whatever. Because that's how his mom seasoned stuff.

A few months ago we went out to eat and he's currently very deep in Alzheimer's and dementia, and I had to literally put the salt shaker on the table next to us, because he kept forgetting he already drowned his salad in salt. I had to tell him 3 times "they're out of salt, there's a national shortage" before he finally gave up and just ate it.

/He had a quadruple bypass when I was 17
//I should definitely chill out with salt

I... yeah, I actually totally get that.

whatever I cook - my wife, her dad, her mom, are instantly poised to shower it with table salt or even ketchup. it makes me sad/die-a-little-inside, "have you even tasted it yet"

I'm not judging them (Narrator: ok, well, sure, still judging, but... not too much judgment) because we all are who we are. we like what we like.

really sorry to hear that news about your dad. mine's 71 and... ok, so, when I was a kid my mom had zero idea how to cook (not her fault, just culture of the 70s/80s) and so he is not only used to but loves all food to be burnt. I kid you not. he was visiting us this past weekend for my wife's birthday and literally every breakfast I made?
- french toast. burnt.
- ham. burnt.
- scrambled eggs. burnt.
- hash browns. burnt.
- turkey bacon. burnt.
- eggs in frames. burnt.
- toast&butter. oh you better believe that's a paddlin' burnt.

I had to try pretty hard to overcook and burn every of the things!

me, I like everything to be maillard as the day is long and I love "burnt" stuff, but this man, yeah... he loves it black as the devil's underwear?


Granny was the same way. Apparently it was to disguise food had already gone bad... as they were dirt poor. Grandma wore potato sacks for clothes poor.
 
2021-10-13 9:22:39 PM  

August11: Once again, this is a burden of the poor. If you have the luxury of time and resources, you can enjoy healthy, slow food that you cook and season well enough. If you are forced into the ramen section, a corporate attorney is overseeing your preserving salt bath of death. With maybe a touch of sodium benzoate or maybe pyroacid whatever it is.


frinkiac.comView Full Size
 
2021-10-13 9:34:19 PM  
The more I've eliminated additional salt from my diet over the years, the more I taste it in foods that I never thought about being salty before.

It is freaking everywhere.
 
2021-10-13 9:45:35 PM  
how bout salty death. i love mine!
New! Bug-A-Salt Demonstration!
Youtube pnZ-7ArqTdw
 
2021-10-13 10:23:40 PM  
Restaurants seem to oversalt everything these days. The last 3 different restaurants I went to way oversalted their food. It was awful every time. Is this what most people actually like? Whatever happened to "just make it and people will add salt if they want to"?
 
2021-10-13 10:44:07 PM  
Been sticking to 2000 mg/day, give or take, for about 1.5 years now.

The change barely affected my home cooking. Except for a lot of South/East Asian cuisine, where I went out and bought the lowest sodium sauces I could find that weren't outright "light" and shiatty tasting. Actually learned that many of those sauces tend to have less sodium as quality goes up, so (price notwithstanding) a lot of my food actually tastes better while having less salt.

I've definitely noticed it more in restaurants, now that my palate's adjusted to less salt. The really niche hole in the wall places that're basically serving home cooking tend to use very reasonable salt levels. But I'm not sure I could actually eat a bowl of pho or ramen at a restaurant now; my wife got pho a while back, and while the flavor was good, the salt level made it basically inedible to me (the banh mi I ordered for myself, on the other hand, was farking delicious).
 
2021-10-13 11:23:10 PM  

majestic: jzeeb: Is potassium salt any good? Can we just get companies to start replacing half their salt with potassium salt? The price between the 2 at the store isn't very great.

I can't tell the difference. But I never put salt on/in anything. I'm more of a garlic and pepper type.


I am a cyanide guy myself.  Just spread it all over salmon.  Great stuff.
 
2021-10-13 11:28:33 PM  

August11: I tried a McDonald's chicken sandwich after years of cooking for myself. That thing was a salt lick.


I have a similar reaction to most processed food, after I cut way back on salt.  My mother loved the stuff, and it wasn't until I was an adult that i realized how  much of it I was using.  Now I use much, much, less.
Some things have to have it, of course.  I still eat canned soup.  I've cut way back on the ramen noodles.   I still eat  them sometimes mixed with vegetables, and you don't have to add any salt.
 
2021-10-14 12:49:57 AM  

common sense is an oxymoron: skyotter: common sense is an oxymoron: food companies are already working to reduce sodium "by offering a variety of products to meet consumer demands - lower sodium, reduced sodium, lightly salted, and no salt options," according to a news release

Screw the meaningless categories. If they were serious, food companies would put some sort of SodiumGuide on their packaging so consumers could make informed decisions. But that would be the wrong kind of capitalism.

[Fark user image 850x1163]

Difficulty: customers would still have to *read* ALL the guides.
[Fark user image 425x283]

Fixed. The raw numbers aren't a whole lot better than the marketing labels without some way to compare them.


For Fark's sake, there's a percentage of the recommended amount for everything on the nutrition label, along with the size of the serving and how many servings per container.

fda.govView Full Size


If you can't make the slightest effort in the world, it's your own damn fault.

Heck, restaurants even have nutrition info available on request, or on their websites.
 
2021-10-14 12:56:54 AM  
In the graphic I posted, that item has 20% of the daily value for sodium for one serving, so it's high sodium.

But if you eat all four servings in the container, that's 80% of your daily value, so you best be done eating for the day.
 
2021-10-14 1:17:37 AM  
https://www.insidermonkey.com/blog/11​-​countries-that-consume-the-most-salt-3​59878/ (warning: slideshow)

as per this rando article from 2015, daily per capita

11. Armenia - 5,000 mg of sodium/12.1 grams
10. Azerbaijan - 5,100 mg of sodium/12.3 grams
9. Mongolia - 5,200 mg of sodium/12.6 grams
8. South Korea - 5,300 mg of sodium/12.9 grams
7. Georgia - 5,400 mg of sodium/13.2 grams
6. Kyrgyzstan - 5,400 mg of sodium/13.2 grams
5. Thailand - 5,400 mg of sodium/13.2 grams
4. Tajikistan - 5,500 mg of sodium/13.4 grams
3. Turkmenistan - 5,500 mg of sodium/13.7 grams
2. Uzbekistan - 5,700 mg of sodium/14 grams
1. Kazakhstan - 6,100 mg of sodium/14.8 grams

(note: the 'stans have iodine deficiency problems and use a lot of iodised salt to counteract that.)
 
2021-10-14 1:20:32 AM  

jzeeb: Is potassium salt any good? Can we just get companies to start replacing half their salt with potassium salt? The price between the 2 at the store isn't very great.


It's OK.  I put it in homemade electrolyte drinks sometimes.  It doesn't taste like salt.
 
2021-10-14 1:22:21 AM  

common sense is an oxymoron: food companies are already working to reduce sodium "by offering a variety of products to meet consumer demands - lower sodium, reduced sodium, lightly salted, and no salt options," according to a news release

Screw the meaningless categories. If they were serious, food companies would put some sort of SodiumGuide on their packaging so consumers could make informed decisions. But that would be the wrong kind of capitalism.

[Fark user image image 850x1163]


Also, offering lower-salt versions of their products are not actually reducing the salt in their products. They're not reducing the salt in their main product, which is where the problems are.

It'd be like putting a crown of broccoli and a marshmallow in front of a toddler and saying, "We've improved this child's diet." Not if the kid can still chose the marshmallow, assholes.
 
2021-10-14 1:23:49 AM  

phedex: I use entirely too much salt, to the point where if I'm around people I consciously limit my intake for fear of embarrassment.  I'm 40, probably should limit it for my health.

That being said, maybe due to exercising daily and sweating excess out I have no problems with blood pressure (at least the couple times a year I test myself at random / go to the dr) or water retention, maybe its not a big deal.

probably the biggest deal is high salt & sedentary, you don't get it out of your system, causes problems?


Are you a smoker? The only people I've ever know to eat excessive amounts of salt have been smokers. Usually heavy smokers.
 
2021-10-14 1:27:37 AM  

Joxertheflighty: catmandu: I started reducing my salt way back in the late 1970's in an attempt to manage bad PMS. I will go through a 2 lb box of kosher salt every 5 years or so (and that includes canning pickles and sauerkraut). I follow recipes when baking but do not add salt when cooking. I have often sent food back in restaurants because it was too salty (soups are especially bad). It is amazing how much you can taste the food when it is not over salted*. I have tried some of the emergency/backpacking foods and so many of them are so salty they are inedible.

*Except popcorn. Popcorn needs to be loaded with salt and butter.

I pretty much stopped adding salt to my cooking too.  And I usually make everything rather than order from restaurants or get premade food.  Now I notice when things are even a little salty.  I like salt, and I'll add salt to certain things (like soup lol) but restaurants overdo it a lot.


I have a habit of undersalting my food. I don't like things to be too salty, and I'm always terrified of oversalting. However, if I taste my cooking and it isn't right somehow, 9 times out of 10 it's because I need to add salt. It's ridiculous how often that's the source of the problem.

Not saying to salt your food a lot, but salt is definitely useful in a dish.
 
2021-10-14 2:15:17 AM  

retrobruce: common sense is an oxymoron: skyotter: common sense is an oxymoron: food companies are already working to reduce sodium "by offering a variety of products to meet consumer demands - lower sodium, reduced sodium, lightly salted, and no salt options," according to a news release

Screw the meaningless categories. If they were serious, food companies would put some sort of SodiumGuide on their packaging so consumers could make informed decisions. But that would be the wrong kind of capitalism.

[Fark user image 850x1163]

Difficulty: customers would still have to *read* ALL the guides.
[Fark user image 425x283]

Fixed. The raw numbers aren't a whole lot better than the marketing labels without some way to compare them.

For Fark's sake, there's a percentage of the recommended amount for everything on the nutrition label, along with the size of the serving and how many servings per container.

[fda.gov image 356x319]

If you can't make the slightest effort in the world, it's your own damn fault.

Heck, restaurants even have nutrition info available on request, or on their websites.


And someone who's trying to find a reduced-sodium substitute for a favorite ingredient has to look up that nutritional data for every possible choice, which seems like a nontrivial alternative to just putting the comparison data on the label in the first place like they already do for energy consumption. Why do you have such a problem with that?
 
2021-10-14 2:17:47 AM  
 40, overweight, love salt, and have perfect blood pressure when I give blood.

I drink too.

But 14-21 hours of exercise a week runs a shiat load of salt through your system.

Do I still take too much in? I don't know. You don't know. Tfa doesn't know, and my doctor doesn't know.

Show me some twin studies. Show me some causality. Not for my sake, but for general knowledge and public health. We don't have the right answers to major health questions. We base half our diet advice on a study that lied about red meat. We base another quarter on an ignorant assumption of how cholesterol is made in the body. And that is doubly bullshiat because it focuses so much on hdl and ldl that most studies ignored other unique aspects of cholesterols, AND whether it was causing problems or the results of other problems.

We don't even know with certainty what ratio of macronutrients we should be getting, and even weight lifting studies with money behind them vary on frigging protein intake.

My great grandfather lived to his 90s eating raw meat, bacon and eggs literally every morning, and was a drunk. All science can do is shrug and point to genetics.

And we get bombarded with articles telling us to eat less tasty food to maybe, possibly, squeeze out a few more years on this shiat world? fark off. Anyone concerned they aren't getting enough out of their one ride through life ought to be focusing on something other than longevity. Where is the push for shorter work weeks? My life won't improve by living to 90 instead of 75. It'll improve by not wasting 60 hours a week on work and work related bullshiat, put in place by a social system that tells us we are lazy if we want to work less. I am looking into taking one week of LWOP per year and my coworkers looked at me like I'm farking crazy. How could I possibly want to work a week less? What possible motive could cause me to give up a couple thousand dollars a year?

Like, everyone I've told that to is flabbergasted. People who make less than me were flabbergasted. People who work 40 hours a week, far less per year than me, were aghast at trading some money for time. I was on a date and it kind of came up, and I could visibly see the waitress across from me look down on me for the crime of wanting less money. I probably sank from a 4 to a 3 for even mentioning it. How much money do I have to earn to justify trading money for time? The answer appear to be: there is no amount.

We are farking morons. Our goals are flawed and our path to achieve them moreso.

/Sorry, I went off topic a bit. The power went out and I have nothing better to do.
 
2021-10-14 2:21:28 AM  

common sense is an oxymoron: retrobruce: common sense is an oxymoron: skyotter: common sense is an oxymoron: food companies are already working to reduce sodium "by offering a variety of products to meet consumer demands - lower sodium, reduced sodium, lightly salted, and no salt options," according to a news release

Screw the meaningless categories. If they were serious, food companies would put some sort of SodiumGuide on their packaging so consumers could make informed decisions. But that would be the wrong kind of capitalism.

[Fark user image 850x1163]

Difficulty: customers would still have to *read* ALL the guides.
[Fark user image 425x283]

Fixed. The raw numbers aren't a whole lot better than the marketing labels without some way to compare them.

For Fark's sake, there's a percentage of the recommended amount for everything on the nutrition label, along with the size of the serving and how many servings per container.

[fda.gov image 356x319]

If you can't make the slightest effort in the world, it's your own damn fault.

Heck, restaurants even have nutrition info available on request, or on their websites.

And someone who's trying to find a reduced-sodium substitute for a favorite ingredient has to look up that nutritional data for every possible choice, which seems like a nontrivial alternative to just putting the comparison data on the label in the first place like they already do for energy consumption. Why do you have such a problem with that?


So I gather you want a better infographic to guide your sodium needs.

I'm not sure that is any more justified than a dozen other dietary items. And there isn't room on packaging for everything.

But let's say salt is the #1 thing and we could give it all the space it needs.

What would such a graphic look like for you? You linked energy star, but I'm not sure how that translates into salt.
 
2021-10-14 3:05:35 AM  

jzeeb: Is potassium salt any good? Can we just get companies to start replacing half their salt with potassium salt? The price between the 2 at the store isn't very great.


KCl tastes metallic to me.
 
2021-10-14 4:13:58 AM  

common sense is an oxymoron: retrobruce: common sense is an oxymoron: skyotter: common sense is an oxymoron: food companies are already working to reduce sodium "by offering a variety of products to meet consumer demands - lower sodium, reduced sodium, lightly salted, and no salt options," according to a news release

Screw the meaningless categories. If they were serious, food companies would put some sort of SodiumGuide on their packaging so consumers could make informed decisions. But that would be the wrong kind of capitalism.

[Fark user image 850x1163]

Difficulty: customers would still have to *read* ALL the guides.
[Fark user image 425x283]

Fixed. The raw numbers aren't a whole lot better than the marketing labels without some way to compare them.

For Fark's sake, there's a percentage of the recommended amount for everything on the nutrition label, along with the size of the serving and how many servings per container.

[fda.gov image 356x319]

If you can't make the slightest effort in the world, it's your own damn fault.

Heck, restaurants even have nutrition info available on request, or on their websites.

And someone who's trying to find a reduced-sodium substitute for a favorite ingredient has to look up that nutritional data for every possible choice, which seems like a nontrivial alternative to just putting the comparison data on the label in the first place like they already do for energy consumption. Why do you have such a problem with that?



In other words, you find it too difficult to look at a percent of daily value and understand it.

I chalk it up to laziness and too many participation trophies growing up.


I suppose you could live in a cave and consume nothing but Cheerios and distilled water, but then the Radon would get you.
 
2021-10-14 4:37:27 AM  

Smackledorfer: common sense is an oxymoron: retrobruce: common sense is an oxymoron: skyotter: common sense is an oxymoron: food companies are already working to reduce sodium "by offering a variety of products to meet consumer demands - lower sodium, reduced sodium, lightly salted, and no salt options," according to a news release

Screw the meaningless categories. If they were serious, food companies would put some sort of SodiumGuide on their packaging so consumers could make informed decisions. But that would be the wrong kind of capitalism.

[Fark user image 850x1163]

Difficulty: customers would still have to *read* ALL the guides.
[Fark user image 425x283]

Fixed. The raw numbers aren't a whole lot better than the marketing labels without some way to compare them.

For Fark's sake, there's a percentage of the recommended amount for everything on the nutrition label, along with the size of the serving and how many servings per container.

[fda.gov image 356x319]

If you can't make the slightest effort in the world, it's your own damn fault.

Heck, restaurants even have nutrition info available on request, or on their websites.

And someone who's trying to find a reduced-sodium substitute for a favorite ingredient has to look up that nutritional data for every possible choice, which seems like a nontrivial alternative to just putting the comparison data on the label in the first place like they already do for energy consumption. Why do you have such a problem with that?

So I gather you want a better infographic to guide your sodium needs.

I'm not sure that is any more justified than a dozen other dietary items. And there isn't room on packaging for everything.

But let's say salt is the #1 thing and we could give it all the space it needs.

What would such a graphic look like for you? You linked energy star, but I'm not sure how that translates into salt.


This all started as an observation that the low/reduced/light sodium options food companies are touting as giving consumers a choice are bullshiat without some sort of context (one company's low-sodium product may contain more sodium than someone else's regular version). It then occurred to me that the current nutritional info, while it provides a standard of reference and is certainly helpful in calculating daily intake, is still inadequate in that doesn't indicate how (un)healthy something is compared to other products of the same type, which is the information needed to make a truly informed choice. And while it's certainly possible to look up the sodium content of every comparable product on the market, there is already a product label in use that places some easily quantified value on an easily visualized scale comparing it to other products of the same type. Instead of fuel consumption, this hypothetical food label would simply show a product's nutritional info compared to its competitors, and there's plenty of blank space on the existing label to replace "460 mg" with something like "460 mg (320-750)" not just for sodium but for every other nutrient that's already there.

I guess I just don't get the concept of fetishizing bootstrappy individualism to the point of subsidizing other people's ignorance in the form of increased healthcare costs.
 
2021-10-14 5:01:15 AM  

retrobruce: common sense is an oxymoron: retrobruce: common sense is an oxymoron: skyotter: common sense is an oxymoron: food companies are already working to reduce sodium "by offering a variety of products to meet consumer demands - lower sodium, reduced sodium, lightly salted, and no salt options," according to a news release

Screw the meaningless categories. If they were serious, food companies would put some sort of SodiumGuide on their packaging so consumers could make informed decisions. But that would be the wrong kind of capitalism.

[Fark user image 850x1163]

Difficulty: customers would still have to *read* ALL the guides.
[Fark user image 425x283]

Fixed. The raw numbers aren't a whole lot better than the marketing labels without some way to compare them.

For Fark's sake, there's a percentage of the recommended amount for everything on the nutrition label, along with the size of the serving and how many servings per container.

[fda.gov image 356x319]

If you can't make the slightest effort in the world, it's your own damn fault.

Heck, restaurants even have nutrition info available on request, or on their websites.

And someone who's trying to find a reduced-sodium substitute for a favorite ingredient has to look up that nutritional data for every possible choice, which seems like a nontrivial alternative to just putting the comparison data on the label in the first place like they already do for energy consumption. Why do you have such a problem with that?


In other words, you find it too difficult to look at a percent of daily value and understand it.

I chalk it up to laziness and too many participation trophies growing up.


I suppose you could live in a cave and consume nothing but Cheerios and distilled water, but then the Radon would get you.


Do you have to work at misunderstanding simple statements, or does it come naturally to you? What does looking at one %DV say about other %DVs so that an informed choice can be made among them? Go ahead, I'll wait.

And speaking of fetishizing bootstrappy individualism, you seem to be a poster child.
 
2021-10-14 5:29:11 AM  

common sense is an oxymoron: Smackledorfer: common sense is an oxymoron: retrobruce: common sense is an oxymoron: skyotter: common sense is an oxymoron: food companies are already working to reduce sodium "by offering a variety of products to meet consumer demands - lower sodium, reduced sodium, lightly salted, and no salt options," according to a news release

Screw the meaningless categories. If they were serious, food companies would put some sort of SodiumGuide on their packaging so consumers could make informed decisions. But that would be the wrong kind of capitalism.

[Fark user image 850x1163]

Difficulty: customers would still have to *read* ALL the guides.
[Fark user image 425x283]

Fixed. The raw numbers aren't a whole lot better than the marketing labels without some way to compare them.

For Fark's sake, there's a percentage of the recommended amount for everything on the nutrition label, along with the size of the serving and how many servings per container.

[fda.gov image 356x319]

If you can't make the slightest effort in the world, it's your own damn fault.

Heck, restaurants even have nutrition info available on request, or on their websites.

And someone who's trying to find a reduced-sodium substitute for a favorite ingredient has to look up that nutritional data for every possible choice, which seems like a nontrivial alternative to just putting the comparison data on the label in the first place like they already do for energy consumption. Why do you have such a problem with that?

So I gather you want a better infographic to guide your sodium needs.

I'm not sure that is any more justified than a dozen other dietary items. And there isn't room on packaging for everything.

But let's say salt is the #1 thing and we could give it all the space it needs.

What would such a graphic look like for you? You linked energy star, but I'm not sure how that translates into salt.

This all started as an observation that the low/reduced/light sodium options food companies are touting as giving consumers a choice are bullshiat without some sort of context (one company's low-sodium product may contain more sodium than someone else's regular version). It then occurred to me that the current nutritional info, while it provides a standard of reference and is certainly helpful in calculating daily intake, is still inadequate in that doesn't indicate how (un)healthy something is compared to other products of the same type, which is the information needed to make a truly informed choice. And while it's certainly possible to look up the sodium content of every comparable product on the market, there is already a product label in use that places some easily quantified value on an easily visualized scale comparing it to other products of the same type. Instead of fuel consumption, this hypothetical food label would simply show a product's nutritional info compared to its competitors, and there's plenty of blank space on the existing label to replace "460 mg" with something like "460 mg (320-750)" not just for sodium but for every other nutrient that's already there.

I guess I just don't get the concept of fetishizing bootstrappy individualism to the point of subsidizing other people's ignorance in the form of increased healthcare costs.


This makes no sense.

You want a lot more information but can't even describe how it would be shown. And no, energy star doesn't translate into micronutrients.
 
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