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(Some Guy)   Data shows a new Multiple Sclerosis drug raises the effective level of COVID-19 vaccines to virtually 100%. And at just over $2000 per dose, it's a potential cash cow. Er, I mean, Long-term patient-centric prophylaxis to give you peace of mind   (pmlive.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Immune system, Antibody, Multiple sclerosis, Vaccination, results of a new analysis of immune response, Vaccine, COVID-19 vaccine, MS therapies  
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512 clicks; posted to STEM » on 13 Oct 2021 at 7:36 PM (9 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



8 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-10-13 7:45:49 PM  
Uhm that tis not what I got out of that announcement. What I read is that the vaccine still works if you are on biogen's therapy. Makes sense too. Natalizumab is an A4 integrin inhibitor that basically just makes it so that immune cells cannot worm their way through the blood brain barrier and thus protects the brain from neuroinflamation. It does not impact b cells or the peripheral immune system at all. This is opposed to other monoclonal antibodies some of which whipe out whole classes of cells some of which are antibody producing. The other drugs mentioned also do not target b cells and this shouldn't have much affect on antibody based immunity.
 
2021-10-13 7:54:47 PM  

The_Homeless_Guy: What I read is that the vaccine still works if you are on biogen's therapy.


Yah, what I got too.

"data indicate that 100% of people with MS treated with natalizumab, interferons or fumarates achieved an antibody response following COVID-19 vaccination."

Translation for Subby: "everybody treated for MS also showed [some level of] a positive immune effect from getting a COVID vaccination."

Good news for MS patients, bad news for Subby's otherwise promising headline.
 
2021-10-13 7:56:28 PM  
For example one would totally expect anti cd20 therapy to fark up your bodies ability to respond to vaccines and develop humoral immunity. Sure enough it does with, as mentioned in the article, about a 40 percent effectiveness rate of the covid 19 vaccine.

That said tysabri/natalizumab isn't a cure all. That is the one you have to stop if you become JC virus positive as, due to the absence of certain immune cells in the brain, it can lead to an ultimately fatal infection (PML).

Interestingly enough a vaccine approach may be possible for MS. Essentially you can make a vaccine that, instead of telling the body that an included protein is bad, you can includes bits of mrna code to tell the cells that uptake it to present the protein as a "good" antigen and to create cells that reduce inflammation when they encounter it. Biontech (makers of the Pfizer vaccine) have developed just such an mRNA vaccine that worked well in a mouse model in that it did prevent disease progression and did cause the mice to make regulatory immune cells to protect glial cells displaying the targeted antigen. While this was attempted before with viral vectors (similar to the j&j vaccine) the process with those was more complicated. The mRNA technology seems to be much easier to develop and more effective.
 
2021-10-13 8:07:29 PM  

SansNeural: The_Homeless_Guy: What I read is that the vaccine still works if you are on biogen's therapy.

Yah, what I got too.

"data indicate that 100% of people with MS treated with natalizumab, interferons or fumarates achieved an antibody response following COVID-19 vaccination."

Translation for Subby: "everybody treated for MS also showed [some level of] a positive immune effect from getting a COVID vaccination."

Good news for MS patients, bad news for Subby's otherwise promising headline.


Yep. Again, if you know how various Ms therapies work this is mostly unsurprising though the fumarate and interferon results are a bit surprising as those are very nonspecific (they affect a wide array of immune cells in the entire body). Probably depends on what your definition of 100 percent effective is. But that natalizumab = good antibody response vs killing off all your cd20 cells that are involved in antibody production= bad antibody response is thoroughly uninteresting.
 
2021-10-13 8:12:26 PM  

The_Homeless_Guy: The mRNA technology seems to be much easier to develop and more effective.


Yes.  The pandemic has probably accelerated the active application of mRNA medical treatments by a decade (me just guessing) or more over the plodding conservative track that might have been.

I had not paid attention to potential immune effects such as your examples, but I anticipate mRNA therapies for many genetic deficiencies that result in inadequate or malfunctioning protein production.
 
2021-10-13 8:33:02 PM  

SansNeural: The_Homeless_Guy: The mRNA technology seems to be much easier to develop and more effective.

Yes.  The pandemic has probably accelerated the active application of mRNA medical treatments by a decade (me just guessing) or more over the plodding conservative track that might have been.

I had not paid attention to potential immune effects such as your examples, but I anticipate mRNA therapies for many genetic deficiencies that result in inadequate or malfunctioning protein production.


The lipid encapsulation might even be useful for DNA based gene therapies. One of the problems with viral vector approaches is that you could only use them a limited number of times before you develop immunity to the viral vector.

With this is the fact that, when we have attempted to actually inset new DNA into existing  DNA, we often were pretty good at causing cancer (pretty unsurprising, disrupt an oncogene bad things happen). Thus some of the more successful gene therapies to date such as ZOLGENSMA use DNA but don't integrate it into our cellular DNA. This works, but means it doesn't get passed along when cells are replicated. This isn't a problem for nerve cells that don't really replicate and hence why the aav9 based ZOLGENSMA is perfect for treating sma.

I haven't seen any examples, but I could imagine we will be able to do interesting things with lipid nanoparticle based DNA treatments. You could keep applying the gene therapy as often as you needed and not have to worry about integration into cellular DNA and potential cancer risks.
 
2021-10-13 9:42:08 PM  
Meanwhile in news that's actually related what what subby is trying to say,

https://www.news-medical.net/news/2021​1010/Inactivated-polio-vaccine-induces​-antibodies-that-block-SARS-CoV-2-RNA-​synthesis.aspx

... inactivated polio vaccine produces cross-reacting antibodies that inhibit covid viral replication. This would also provide at least some part of the explanation for why the pandemic is not hitting Africa nearly as hard as might be imagined.
 
2021-10-14 6:46:22 AM  

The_Homeless_Guy: That said tysabri/natalizumab isn't a cure all. That is the one you have to stop if you become JC virus positive as, due to the absence of certain immune cells in the brain, it can lead to an ultimately fatal infection (PML).


Can confirm. Wife was on tysabri until she turned up JCV positive a couple of weeks ago. She's had a rough year overall, sans COVID-19 thankfully.
 
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