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(AP News)   Researchers reported today that North America's oldest human footprints have been discovered in New Mexico, but did not indicate if they will check Old Mexico next   (apnews.com) divider line
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408 clicks; posted to STEM » on 24 Sep 2021 at 4:10 AM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2021-09-23 11:31:47 PM  
New Mexico: not really new, not really Mexico, but I'll take ten pounds of Hatch chiles to go, please.
 
2021-09-24 12:38:41 AM  
Why not Middle-Age Mexico? We know it stays mostly in its man cave or washing its V6 Mustang,  but you never know.
 
2021-09-24 4:49:41 AM  
Which way were they headed?
 
2021-09-24 5:34:45 AM  

jso2897: Which way were they headed?


Forward.
 
2021-09-24 6:10:43 AM  

jso2897: Which way were they headed?


Away from Texas. Even during that period, Texas was already too caveman and bigoted.
 
2021-09-24 7:49:27 AM  

scottydoesntknow: Why not Middle-Age Mexico? We know it stays mostly in its man cave or washing its V6 Mustang,  but you never know.


They had their mid-life crisis and tried to secede.
 
2021-09-24 8:19:43 AM  
th.bing.comView Full Size
 
2021-09-24 8:48:15 AM  
If there are still any "Clovis First" imbeciles still spouting their debunked nonsense, this ought to finally shut them up.

Cool find. Neat idea to use seeds embedded in the footprints to date them.
 
2021-09-24 10:07:44 AM  
Even if it's a plaster casting, it's still cool to actually see the feet of Christopher Columbus.
 
2021-09-24 10:23:23 AM  

REO-Weedwagon: Even if it's a plaster casting, it's still cool to actually see the feet of Christopher Columbus.


Ugh, not that myth again. It's totally Knights Templar.
 
2021-09-24 1:10:00 PM  
https://www.science.org/content/artic​l​e/human-footprints-near-ice-age-lake-s​uggest-surprisingly-early-arrival-amer​icas
Human footprints near ice age lake suggest surprisingly early arrival in the Americas
If dates hold, tracks would put people in New Mexico thousands of years earlier than thought

Fark user imageView Full Size


Over years of fieldwork in White Sands National Park in New Mexico, researchers have found thousands of footprints left by humans and animals around a now-dry lakebed, including extinct megafauna such as mammoths and ground sloths. The new paper, published today in Science, focuses on 60 human footprints found in seven layers of sediment, like a "palimpsest of people walking over a long period of time," says Matthew Bennett, an ancient footprint expert at Bournemouth University. Based on the sizes of those prints, he thinks most were left by teenagers and children who were perhaps fetching water or just passing the time. "People spend a lot of time playing. And what better place to play than the edge of a lake?"

To find out, the researchers radiocarbon dated seeds embedded in several layers of earth between the footprints. The dating put the seeds between about 23,000 and 21,000 years old, during the height of glaciation.

But Davis suggests a nagging possibility: that the seeds are older than the footprints because they eroded out of older sediments, then sifted into the mud the team excavated. He'd like to see the team try optically stimulated luminescence dating, a method that reveals when quartz grains were last exposed to light, to date when the sediment around the footprints was buried.
 
2021-09-24 3:48:58 PM  

Wenchmaster: If there are still any "Clovis First" imbeciles still spouting their debunked nonsense, this ought to finally shut them up.

Cool find. Neat idea to use seeds embedded in the footprints to date them.


As I recall, the oldest confirmed date for humans in the Americas was only a little bit older than the Clovis site...but was all the way down at the southern end of South America.  The "Clovis barrier" has been broken, but not as strongly as this find, IF the date holds.
 
2021-09-24 5:56:50 PM  

jso2897: Which way were they headed?


It's safe to say they should have taken a left turn.
 
2021-09-24 8:29:47 PM  
was it 2 sets or was God already riding our asses?
 
2021-09-25 2:49:31 PM  
The Clovis people themselves were extremely suspect until archaeologists found a mastadon with a Clovis projectile point lodged in its hip at Clovis, New Mexico (hence the name of the cultural group). They halted work and telegraphed for skeptics from the Smithsonian and other places to come out and finish the excavation themselves so they could see that it had not been tampered with.

It was the first time that scientists had physical, recognized evidence that humans had co-existed with extinct animals, up to that point suspected but never actually backed up with undeniable evidence.

That remains the legacy of Clovis, this seismic shift undermined the idea of the biological aspect of the steady state universe where nothing "in nature" fundamentally changed during the existence of humans. That steady state concept, rooted primarily in religious dogma, had already been used as the basis for economics; although one could point to the local exhaustion of certain resources such as trees, there were always other trees elsewhere and no need to conserve for the long term, just for the lifespans of human lives. Of course Malthus disagreed but the bulk of academia at least here in the US clung to Biblical revelation as the basis for scientific enquiry; it was the default narrative and any concept that opposed it had to be definitively proven to be taught especially in places like Harvard. Early Popular Science, back when they published the writings of Spencer and other scientists of the day directly, also had what today seem like unhinged religious nuttery from the top levels of Harvard about how secularists had to be stopped by Christians and that science had to be founded in Biblical truth.

And then came Clovis, and Clovis proved that an entire species of large animal had gone extinct in the time that humans existed. That humans had been alive long enough to hunt mastadons and their contemporaries. That there was nothing inherently protecting nature from humans or from other forms of extinction.

Clovis, at least in the US, is perhaps the most foundational discovery made by US researchers in moving the story of the world away from a story just about humanity and made future discoveries in astronomy and geology far more palatable.

The mythologism of Clovis both within and without archeology placed very difficult hurdles to overcome the culture's "first First Nations" status in consensus beyond what should have been necessary. But that's how myth works. It does nothing to dispel the facts of the situation, either physical or cultural, but the conclusion of "earliest Americans" (and that term is used far more than it should be, because of course we claim patrimony of randos walking around 12,000+ years ago, we love our colonialism here in the US) has been a cultural touchstone and the core of many tenured professors, and nothing is as powerful in refuting reality as human ego.
 
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