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(Some Guy)   8 important questions to ask before buying a home. And remember, anything below 30 cubic feet wasn't really a full-sized refrigerator, so those boxes will be tighter on total living space   (yourmoneygeek.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Real estate, home buying process, real estate marketplaces, first time home, right questions, new home buyer, Mortgage Payment, Homeowner Association  
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1085 clicks; posted to Business » and Discussion » on 22 Sep 2021 at 5:05 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



50 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-09-22 5:11:08 PM  
Get an inspection, even if it's sold as-is, that inspection report will tell you what you're getting into.  Even if you know what you're doing they might see something you miss.
 
2021-09-22 5:17:12 PM  
Also, is it just you or a family? Are you renting out a room or two? Do you want to spend weekends doing lawn work and fixing stuff?  Do you like living in the burbs?  How much is insurance for the house?
 
2021-09-22 5:20:47 PM  
What's the climate going to be like in 20 years?
 
2021-09-22 5:25:49 PM  
Here's not a question to ask yourself, but rather a general mindset:  buy a house that's just expensive enough to make you feel the sting of that monthly mortgage payment.  And often, debt is your friend rather than your enemy.

In 1960 my parents bought their first house.  They took out a 30 year mortgage.  Their $62.50 monthly payment stung a little in 1960.  By 1970?  That $62.50 represented my father's average trip charge making calls as an appliance repairman - the mortgage was paid off 20 years early.

In 1995 I bought my first house.  I took out a 30 year mortgage.  My $875 monthly payment stung a lot in 1995.  Today it's nothing by comparison.  I could pay it off if I could, but I'm better off owing the remainder because it helps my credit score and I borrowed at a rate that is exceeded by inflation most years.

Inflation takes care of everything over time.  If you can make the payment on a house today?  You'll make it with ease a decade from now provided you've not had a serious setback.  So buy what you like and what you can afford - but don't be afraid to stick your neck out a little.
 
2021-09-22 6:40:09 PM  
If you need this article to know to ask these questions, you shouldn't be buying a house.

/"Why is there a dead turtle under the stove?" was apparently a question I needed to ask after replacing the stove shortly after I moved into mine
 
2021-09-22 7:07:14 PM  
From experience: Where's the septic tank, and when was it last pumped?
 
2021-09-22 7:18:44 PM  
Everytime I try to buy a home, the homeowners ask me two questions.

1.  Who are you?
2.  What are you doing here?
 
2021-09-22 7:20:59 PM  
don't always trust your realtor to suggest an inspector--your realtor is incentivized to have you buy the house and may have an arrangement with the inspector they offer

the first time you buy a house is a stressful and exciting time but a good inspector is an important choice best not left to someone else
 
2021-09-22 7:31:27 PM  
Make sure you can still afford your mortgage should you get canned from your job and have to take a minimum wage job at McDonalds.   A lot can happen in 30 years.

Also, location is the most important factor.
 
2021-09-22 7:41:37 PM  
One thing I wrestled with is how close to ideal does it need to be? Trying to break things down into nice to have, must have, not too annoying, and deal-breaker. It never really worked out because I moved so fast but given time it would have been a good system. In the end I got a few nice to haves, all the must haves, a few minor things that don't annoy me too much, and no deal breakers. It was still a freaking ordeal.
 
2021-09-22 7:54:11 PM  

TomDooley: Make sure you can still afford your mortgage should you get canned from your job and have to take a minimum wage job at McDonalds.


What person working at McDonald's can afford a mortgage?
 
2021-09-22 8:04:32 PM  

austerity101: TomDooley: Make sure you can still afford your mortgage should you get canned from your job and have to take a minimum wage job at McDonalds.

What person working at McDonald's can afford a mortgage?


depends on where you live, really.
i always say that a person living in Arizona (Phoenix area) could manage a mortgage payment working full time greeting people at Wal-Mart.

i assume the income is similar.
 
2021-09-22 8:05:08 PM  
Don't be too quick to upgrade. We bought our first home in '85 with two little girls in tow. 35+ years later we're empty nesters with a comfortable sized house (under 1000 sq ft) and still too much stuff to fill the available space.
 
2021-09-22 8:09:19 PM  
8 questions even a moron wouldn't buy a house without looking into. FFS, I'm surprised "How much does it cost?" wasn't on there.
 
2021-09-22 8:17:54 PM  
I was looking for a new home in a new district. I had an area I liked for me and the kids but didn't know what the neighborhood was like. I went to the local school fete and checked out not just the school, but the locals as well. It was extra information that I wouldn't have got from any normal real estate searching or viewing houses. I still live here 20 years later
 
2021-09-22 8:21:30 PM  

morg: One thing I wrestled with is how close to ideal does it need to be? Trying to break things down into nice to have, must have, not too annoying, and deal-breaker. It never really worked out because I moved so fast but given time it would have been a good system. In the end I got a few nice to haves, all the must haves, a few minor things that don't annoy me too much, and no deal breakers. It was still a freaking ordeal.


Yeah, we did that.  Our "must haves" included things like "screened in back porch," "garden tub," "walk in his/hers closets,"  "big kitchen with island," "four bedrooms," "finished basement for home theater," "two car garage with workshop." It also included "Not a townhouse" (I'm not going to be in my goddamn 40's sharing walls like a college student) and "Under $400K"

The last one forced us to revise our "musts" and "nice to haves."  Basically, we got "4 bedroom" "not a townhouse" and "under $400K"  Nowadays even that last one wouldn't be manageable.
 
2021-09-22 8:35:04 PM  

tdyak: Get an inspection, even if it's sold as-is, that inspection report will tell you what you're getting into.  Even if you know what you're doing they might see something you miss.


I'm blown away by the number of young people who are skipping the inspection because they're nervous about moving too slowly.

However, inspectors are not plumbing and electrical experts. If you're buying a restored, historic home, you need to bring them in. I lived in a rented one for several years, and while it looked like the person who did the restoration did a good job - everything looked brand new - when I had a plumbing issue, the plumber pointed out all of the corners that were cut with the plumbing and electrical, all of which previous inspectors missed (the home had been sold twice after being restored).
 
2021-09-22 8:36:54 PM  

Isitoveryet: austerity101: TomDooley: Make sure you can still afford your mortgage should you get canned from your job and have to take a minimum wage job at McDonalds.

What person working at McDonald's can afford a mortgage?

depends on where you live, really.
i always say that a person living in Arizona (Phoenix area) could manage a mortgage payment working full time greeting people at Wal-Mart.

i assume the income is similar.


I'm skeptical that a gross income of about $30k per year would cover it near any big city.

But even if Phoenix is an exception, I don't think it's wise to plan to handle a worst-case scenario that way. If things really do go that badly, you would surely be better off selling the house. For most people, such a turn is unlikely and the likelihood of building a little wealth through ownership should outweigh the risks of remote possibilities.
 
2021-09-22 8:38:08 PM  
Get the main sewer drain camera inspected.
 
2021-09-22 8:56:55 PM  

morg: One thing I wrestled with is how close to ideal does it need to be? Trying to break things down into nice to have, must have, not too annoying, and deal-breaker. It never really worked out because I moved so fast but given time it would have been a good system. In the end I got a few nice to haves, all the must haves, a few minor things that don't annoy me too much, and no deal breakers. It was still a freaking ordeal.


Yeah we were able to get 90% of what we wanted, but with a 35 minute commute.  Our monthly mortgage plus escrow on a 4 bd 2.5 ba house was the same as the rent on our 2 bd 1 ba apartment in town.  Ten years later it's half as much.
 
2021-09-22 9:03:33 PM  
"How Is the School District" Don't have kids, so I don't care.
 
2021-09-22 9:08:21 PM  

jayphat: "How Is the School District" Don't have kids, so I don't care.


This is the way.
 
2021-09-22 9:08:36 PM  

Robinfro: From experience: Where's the septic tank, and when was it last pumped?


I like this one because if the answer is anything other than "what farking septic system are you talking about?" then I know it's not the house for me
 
2021-09-22 9:56:46 PM  

TomDooley: Make sure you can still afford your mortgage should you get canned from your job and have to take a minimum wage job at McDonalds.   A lot can happen in 30 years.

Also, location is the most important factor.


Well, I could afford a hamster cage on minimum wage.  It comes with the wheel.
 
2021-09-22 10:04:49 PM  

Robinfro: From experience: Where's the septic tank, and when was it last pumped?


1) PolTab
2) Never
 
2021-09-22 10:09:10 PM  
Definitely get an inspection, pick the inspector and pay for it yourself. We put a bid on a house contingent on the inspection.  Sewer needed to be replaced and it ran under the driveway, sidewalk and part of the road - 7k.  Flat membrane roof needed to be replaced - $40k.  Porches were rotted, just the beams you couldn't see - 4-6k.  The seller refused to do any work or discount the price; she "got an inspection and did all of the work". I think her inspector was an interior decorator.

We walked. Found a better place, closer to my wife's job, for less money.

/not my first rodeo
//or second
///or seventh
 
2021-09-22 10:11:01 PM  
As for Number 4, Why is the seller leaving?  I don't think you'll get an honest answer from the seller if the seller thinks an honest answer may kill his sale.
 
2021-09-22 10:19:46 PM  

BlazeTrailer: Robinfro: From experience: Where's the septic tank, and when was it last pumped?

I like this one because if the answer is anything other than "what farking septic system are you talking about?" then I know it's not the house for me


Had to call the realtor, who called the previous owners who said they had no idea (they'd been here for 20-odd years).

After digging the line up, we discovered the original owners poured a slab on top of what WOULD have obviously been the top of a septic tank & put a shed on it.

The access cover had a date of 9/18/94 grease penciled on as the last date of service. The pump truck was full to the max at 500 gallons.
 
2021-09-22 10:20:26 PM  

FarkaDark: Robinfro: From experience: Where's the septic tank, and when was it last pumped?

1) PolTab
2) Never


Until the next time Drew gets drunk & nukes it.
 
2021-09-22 10:43:23 PM  
Inspector inspector inspector

Walking around the fist house I bought, after going through the inside, the inspector goes, "Oh, and there's the vent for your oil tank..." and we stopped, looked at each other and I go "Why? The house had gas heat"

Turned out to be 1500 gallons of oil storage half filled with oily, sludgy water dug in next to the driveway just waiting to rust through.

Seller had the two tanks pumped, dug up and the soil under tested then had them backfilled before I bought the house.

1500 gallons! Who could afford to fill those?
 
2021-09-22 10:58:02 PM  

BlazeTrailer: Robinfro: From experience: Where's the septic tank, and when was it last pumped?

I like this one because if the answer is anything other than "what farking septic system are you talking about?" then I know it's not the house for me


Any particular reason?

I found my dream home (literally every one of my must-haves and nice-to-haves either there or possible to add) at a price I could afford, with septic. Not my first choice there, but not a deal breaker. What do you know that I don't?
 
2021-09-22 11:10:23 PM  

Chevello: Inspector inspector inspector

Walking around the fist house I bought, after going through the inside, the inspector goes, "Oh, and there's the vent for your oil tank..." and we stopped, looked at each other and I go "Why? The house had gas heat"

Turned out to be 1500 gallons of oil storage half filled with oily, sludgy water dug in next to the driveway just waiting to rust through.

Seller had the two tanks pumped, dug up and the soil under tested then had them backfilled before I bought the house.

1500 gallons! Who could afford to fill those?


You'd fill it once a year.
 
2021-09-22 11:10:55 PM  

Robinfro: BlazeTrailer: Robinfro: From experience: Where's the septic tank, and when was it last pumped?

I like this one because if the answer is anything other than "what farking septic system are you talking about?" then I know it's not the house for me

Had to call the realtor, who called the previous owners who said they had no idea (they'd been here for 20-odd years).

After digging the line up, we discovered the original owners poured a slab on top of what WOULD have obviously been the top of a septic tank & put a shed on it.

The access cover had a date of 9/18/94 grease penciled on as the last date of service. The pump truck was full to the max at 500 gallons.


That's a load of shiat.
 
2021-09-22 11:15:53 PM  

Chabash: Chevello: Inspector inspector inspector

Walking around the fist house I bought, after going through the inside, the inspector goes, "Oh, and there's the vent for your oil tank..." and we stopped, looked at each other and I go "Why? The house had gas heat"

Turned out to be 1500 gallons of oil storage half filled with oily, sludgy water dug in next to the driveway just waiting to rust through.

Seller had the two tanks pumped, dug up and the soil under tested then had them backfilled before I bought the house.

1500 gallons! Who could afford to fill those?

You'd fill it once a year.


I've never had oil heat, but I certainly hope it doesn't take 1500 gallons of oil to heat a house for one winter. Maybe the heaters were that inefficient in the 70s though.
 
2021-09-22 11:30:39 PM  

Chevello: Chabash: Chevello: Inspector inspector inspector

Walking around the fist house I bought, after going through the inside, the inspector goes, "Oh, and there's the vent for your oil tank..." and we stopped, looked at each other and I go "Why? The house had gas heat"

Turned out to be 1500 gallons of oil storage half filled with oily, sludgy water dug in next to the driveway just waiting to rust through.

Seller had the two tanks pumped, dug up and the soil under tested then had them backfilled before I bought the house.

1500 gallons! Who could afford to fill those?

You'd fill it once a year.

I've never had oil heat, but I certainly hope it doesn't take 1500 gallons of oil to heat a house for one winter. Maybe the heaters were that inefficient in the 70s though.


We bought a house in North Portland that had a 600 gallon oil tank. It got removed by the seller but the new furnace took a while, so I was buying diesel every other day. It would burn 2.5 gallons a day to heat a 1400 sqft ranch.
 
2021-09-22 11:35:59 PM  

Isitoveryet: austerity101: TomDooley: Make sure you can still afford your mortgage should you get canned from your job and have to take a minimum wage job at McDonalds.

What person working at McDonald's can afford a mortgage?

depends on where you live, really.
i always say that a person living in Arizona (Phoenix area) could manage a mortgage payment working full time greeting people at Wal-Mart.

i assume the income is similar.


It's been many years since Phoenix was that affordable.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-09-23 12:02:08 AM  

Robinfro: From experience: Where's the septic tank, and when was it last pumped?


A former boss of mine had his ancient septic tank collapse.
He took a day off, dug it out, rebuilt the walls, and covered it himself. He said he recovered his sense of smell after about a week.  Saved himself probably $40,000.
 
2021-09-23 12:20:33 AM  

Chabash: Chevello: Chabash: Chevello: Inspector inspector inspector

Walking around the fist house I bought, after going through the inside, the inspector goes, "Oh, and there's the vent for your oil tank..." and we stopped, looked at each other and I go "Why? The house had gas heat"

Turned out to be 1500 gallons of oil storage half filled with oily, sludgy water dug in next to the driveway just waiting to rust through.

Seller had the two tanks pumped, dug up and the soil under tested then had them backfilled before I bought the house.

1500 gallons! Who could afford to fill those?

You'd fill it once a year.

I've never had oil heat, but I certainly hope it doesn't take 1500 gallons of oil to heat a house for one winter. Maybe the heaters were that inefficient in the 70s though.

We bought a house in North Portland that had a 600 gallon oil tank. It got removed by the seller but the new furnace took a while, so I was buying diesel every other day. It would burn 2.5 gallons a day to heat a 1400 sqft ranch.


That's crazy.
The neighbor to that house converted to coal heat because he said it was cheaper. The smell was terrible.
 
2021-09-23 12:28:26 AM  

Northern: Robinfro: From experience: Where's the septic tank, and when was it last pumped?

A former boss of mine had his ancient septic tank collapse.
He took a day off, dug it out, rebuilt the walls, and covered it himself. He said he recovered his sense of smell after about a week.  Saved himself probably $40,000.


JFC I'd rather spend the $40K
 
2021-09-23 12:43:42 AM  

mcmnky: BlazeTrailer: Robinfro: From experience: Where's the septic tank, and when was it last pumped?

I like this one because if the answer is anything other than "what farking septic system are you talking about?" then I know it's not the house for me

Any particular reason?

I found my dream home (literally every one of my must-haves and nice-to-haves either there or possible to add) at a price I could afford, with septic. Not my first choice there, but not a deal breaker. What do you know that I don't?


No, just not prepared to personally manage that nor the consequences of me incompetently doing so.

When I was touring my house in a semi-urban area of Chicago i was shocked that it had a well. After i got over that my very next question was "wait, is this sewer or septic".

My mother is rural and has had septic for 25 years. They're fine.
 
2021-09-23 1:03:42 AM  

BlazeTrailer: mcmnky: BlazeTrailer: Robinfro: From experience: Where's the septic tank, and when was it last pumped?

I like this one because if the answer is anything other than "what farking septic system are you talking about?" then I know it's not the house for me

Any particular reason?

I found my dream home (literally every one of my must-haves and nice-to-haves either there or possible to add) at a price I could afford, with septic. Not my first choice there, but not a deal breaker. What do you know that I don't?

No, just not prepared to personally manage that nor the consequences of me incompetently doing so.

When I was touring my house in a semi-urban area of Chicago i was shocked that it had a well. After i got over that my very next question was "wait, is this sewer or septic".

My mother is rural and has had septic for 25 years. They're fine.


Yeah. My biggest concerns are how do I know it's time to have it pumped without waiting for my lawn to turn to shiat? And how do I know it's been pumped?

We didn't think to ask the previous owners when it was last pumped, so we had it done a few years after moving in. Or, at least we paid for it. They came when no one was home, and the grass around the cover or hatch or whatever it's called didn't look disturbed. (The tank is under the front lawn. )

Now it's been another few years, wondering if it's time. It's been getting a lot more use in the past year and a half. Pooping on company time just isn't the same with working from home.
 
2021-09-23 1:06:19 AM  
"Exactly how many murders were there?"

"Was is one murderer or several?"

"Was it cult related?"

"Will those stains wash out or will it need to be replaced?"

"What's the haunting situation like?"
 
2021-09-23 1:45:37 AM  
"Is this in a flood plain?"
 
2021-09-23 2:15:25 AM  
Buy a house that's half of what your pre-approval is for and pay it down heavy.

I was pre-approved for $200k and bought an $80k home. Getting ready to pay it off after 7 years here shortly.

This way you have the funds for unforeseen expenses and repairs and have contingency built in to your budget. I try to double pay my mortgage each month, but if something comes up, I have the ability to cut back to a single payment for a month or two.
 
2021-09-23 2:22:12 AM  

austerity101: TomDooley: Make sure you can still afford your mortgage should you get canned from your job and have to take a minimum wage job at McDonalds.

What person working at McDonald's can afford a mortgage?


McDonalds might be a stretch, but I make $25/hr and I'm getting ready to make the final payments on my 15Y FRM after only 8 years.

The trick is to accept that the big cities aren't for you if you're not wealthy. I bought my house for $80k and I could probably sell it today for a little over $100k.

Real estate in most of the Great Lakes region is extremely affordable and there are plenty of jobs to go around.
 
2021-09-23 8:44:08 AM  

mcmnky: BlazeTrailer: mcmnky: BlazeTrailer: Robinfro: From experience: Where's the septic tank, and when was it last pumped?

I like this one because if the answer is anything other than "what farking septic system are you talking about?" then I know it's not the house for me

Any particular reason?

I found my dream home (literally every one of my must-haves and nice-to-haves either there or possible to add) at a price I could afford, with septic. Not my first choice there, but not a deal breaker. What do you know that I don't?

No, just not prepared to personally manage that nor the consequences of me incompetently doing so.

When I was touring my house in a semi-urban area of Chicago i was shocked that it had a well. After i got over that my very next question was "wait, is this sewer or septic".

My mother is rural and has had septic for 25 years. They're fine.

Yeah. My biggest concerns are how do I know it's time to have it pumped without waiting for my lawn to turn to shiat? And how do I know it's been pumped?

We didn't think to ask the previous owners when it was last pumped, so we had it done a few years after moving in. Or, at least we paid for it. They came when no one was home, and the grass around the cover or hatch or whatever it's called didn't look disturbed. (The tank is under the front lawn. )

Now it's been another few years, wondering if it's time. It's been getting a lot more use in the past year and a half. Pooping on company time just isn't the same with working from home.


Septic tank people aren't magicians and definitely don't care about putting your grass back, so I would say it's safe to say it was not pumped. When we first had ours pumped it had a bunch of wipes in it from a prior owner.

If you wait until you see problems in the yard then you've pretty well hosed your leech field. The enemy of the system isn't poop, as that breaks down. It's FOG - fats, oils and grease. When those take up too much of volume in the tank, they get forced out the outflow and into the leech field. That's why you should never pour cooking grease/animal fats down the drain.
I'd advise to get it pumped and be home for it. Once it's done you should be good for at least 5 years if you refrain from putting grease down it.
 
2021-09-23 9:21:43 AM  

Unscratchable_Itch: "Exactly how many murders were there?"

"Was is one murderer or several?"

"Was it cult related?"

"Will those stains wash out or will it need to be replaced?"

"What's the haunting situation like?"


I'm never sure how to answer these.  I mean, start with "how many?" - does that mean total number of bodies?  Or just incidents?   Then the number of murderers - if it's a joint effort, does each person get full credit? Or what about a legacy situation, where Mother used to do it, then "retired" and I took over for her, but did so whilst wearing her skin?  Then, we need to define "cult" - I mean, couldn't it just be a religious matter? That label is so unfair. And those stains are unrelated, damnit, I'm a professional!

/The haunting thing depends on the individual and cannot be answered, of course. Some people are more susceptible, particularly those who have been vaccinated. I've never been bothered by any supposed ghosts - in fact, most of them are quite friendly and encouraging in my efforts.  You do get the occasional one that seems to try to warn visitors to stay away, but fortunately they're usually too vague for the new guest to understand until it's too late.
 
2021-09-23 10:07:39 AM  

HempHead: Isitoveryet: austerity101: TomDooley: Make sure you can still afford your mortgage should you get canned from your job and have to take a minimum wage job at McDonalds.

What person working at McDonald's can afford a mortgage?

depends on where you live, really.
i always say that a person living in Arizona (Phoenix area) could manage a mortgage payment working full time greeting people at Wal-Mart.

i assume the income is similar.

It's been many years since Phoenix was that affordable.

[Fark user image image 850x437]


Closed on 12/31/2009. 1100 sq ft ranch in a transitioning hood. My 30 year mortgage, depending on how taxes impact escrow, is around $400 a month. House was in great shape overall as it was rehabbed by a flipper before the market crashed I could do this on Fast food manager money for certain. If I had to start flipping burgers, I wouldn't stay at that position long. I was paying $800 a month for my last rental, plus a crazy gas bill because of the bad windows. And Obama paid my down payment. Or rather, he made everyone else pay it.

A good inspector can be a huge help. Mine missed that the gas dryer didn't vent anywhere and the dryer is in the kitchen. If I hadn't noticed it myself, it would have been my problem or the coroner's.

/Thanks Obama!
 
2021-09-23 1:17:58 PM  

runwiz: As for Number 4, Why is the seller leaving?  I don't think you'll get an honest answer from the seller if the seller thinks an honest answer may kill his sale.


Not only that, sometimes the answer is a real bummer. At closing, my wife asked our sellers something like "So what exciting plans are next for you two?" It got real awkward, but they explained they were getting divorced, the wife was living in their realtor friend's garage, they couldn't both afford to stay in the area separately.
 
2021-09-23 2:15:24 PM  

Nosatril: mcmnky: BlazeTrailer: mcmnky: BlazeTrailer: Robinfro: From experience: Where's the septic tank, and when was it last pumped?

I like this one because if the answer is anything other than "what farking septic system are you talking about?" then I know it's not the house for me

Any particular reason?

I found my dream home (literally every one of my must-haves and nice-to-haves either there or possible to add) at a price I could afford, with septic. Not my first choice there, but not a deal breaker. What do you know that I don't?

No, just not prepared to personally manage that nor the consequences of me incompetently doing so.

When I was touring my house in a semi-urban area of Chicago i was shocked that it had a well. After i got over that my very next question was "wait, is this sewer or septic".

My mother is rural and has had septic for 25 years. They're fine.

Yeah. My biggest concerns are how do I know it's time to have it pumped without waiting for my lawn to turn to shiat? And how do I know it's been pumped?

We didn't think to ask the previous owners when it was last pumped, so we had it done a few years after moving in. Or, at least we paid for it. They came when no one was home, and the grass around the cover or hatch or whatever it's called didn't look disturbed. (The tank is under the front lawn. )

Now it's been another few years, wondering if it's time. It's been getting a lot more use in the past year and a half. Pooping on company time just isn't the same with working from home.

Septic tank people aren't magicians and definitely don't care about putting your grass back, so I would say it's safe to say it was not pumped. When we first had ours pumped it had a bunch of wipes in it from a prior owner.

If you wait until you see problems in the yard then you've pretty well hosed your leech field. The enemy of the system isn't poop, as that breaks down. It's FOG - fats, oils and grease. When those take up too much of volume in the tank, they get forced ...


I have mine pumped out once every 3 years. It could go longer, but I've seen some things and don't want to ever have those problems.  I pay about $250 for a pump-out. Money well spent.
 
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