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(MSN)   Whoa, don't piss on that road. You'll never walk right again   (msn.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Automobile, Vehicle, Sport utility vehicle, Electric vehicle, Jeep Wagoneer, Jeep, Internal combustion engine, Gov. Gretchen Whitmer  
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4961 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Sep 2021 at 1:05 AM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



44 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-09-21 10:01:47 PM  
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2021-09-21 10:20:46 PM  
FTFA:  "...Hearing that the front seats in a model featuring the Blue Agave interior include a massage function, she said she "might just take a nap..."

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FTFA:  "...She also let it be known that she'd wrecked her parents' Wagoneer when she was 17, and unlike this bright white, modern version, it was, in fact, a woody."

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2021-09-22 12:16:50 AM  
It's not clear how the technology would work, how soon the pilot project would be operational or how much it might cost

Your tax dollars at work.
 
2021-09-22 1:09:13 AM  
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2021-09-22 1:12:18 AM  
Don't whiz on the electric road.
 
2021-09-22 1:18:38 AM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: It's not clear how the technology would work, how soon the pilot project would be operational or how much it might cost

Your tax dollars at work.


It's a pilot project. Finding out whether the tech works and if it's worth the cost is the whole point.
 
2021-09-22 1:20:25 AM  
If I was there I'd be rockin' on to it.
 
2021-09-22 1:29:10 AM  

nytmare: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's not clear how the technology would work, how soon the pilot project would be operational or how much it might cost

Your tax dollars at work.

It's a pilot project. Finding out whether the tech works and if it's worth the cost is the whole point.


Usually pilot programs start with a prototype.
 
TWX
2021-09-22 1:36:48 AM  

nytmare: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's not clear how the technology would work, how soon the pilot project would be operational or how much it might cost

Your tax dollars at work.

It's a pilot project. Finding out whether the tech works and if it's worth the cost is the whole point.


Based on a cursory google search and some articles, it sounds like the known state of the technology is that it is inefficient for 'dynamic applications' (ie moving vehicles) and the process actually damages the asphalt above the buried infrastructure.

So Michigan is probably already used to the damaged roads, but the inefficiency might simply be too great.  I'm also wondering if inducing the charge could pose problems for things like pacemakers, or even for other random shizz that ends up in proximity to the road or to a vehicle traveling on the road.
 
2021-09-22 1:41:11 AM  
1) Electrify road.
2) Put up signs: "Road is electrified, do not piss."
3) "YOU CAN'T TELL ME WHAT TO DO!" *piss* *bzzzapp*
4) Laugh.
 
2021-09-22 1:50:34 AM  
This is not an idea ready for prime time.
 
2021-09-22 1:53:39 AM  
I'd rather see the solar/thermal/crush stress roads that produce electricity from that blend than roads the yeet electricity at the vehicles driving on them.

If your day to day can be sorted with a fully electric, charge it at home, and do what you need to do.  If not, get a hybrid until battery capacity and quick charge tech catches up with the need to go from 0-100% battery in 5-10 minutes.

It's a fun concept, but it is right up there in realism with running an electric car from the wind turbine mounted on its own hood.
 
TWX
2021-09-22 2:03:03 AM  

makerofbadjokes: I'd rather see the solar/thermal/crush stress roads that produce electricity from that blend than roads the yeet electricity at the vehicles driving on them.

If your day to day can be sorted with a fully electric, charge it at home, and do what you need to do.  If not, get a hybrid until battery capacity and quick charge tech catches up with the need to go from 0-100% battery in 5-10 minutes.

It's a fun concept, but it is right up there in realism with running an electric car from the wind turbine mounted on its own hood.


Risking My Life To Settle A Physics Debate
Youtube jyQwgBAaBag
 
2021-09-22 2:21:44 AM  
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/It's electric
//boogie woogie, woogie
 
2021-09-22 2:47:39 AM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: It's not clear how the technology would work, how soon the pilot project would be operational or how much it might cost

Your tax dollars at work.


Some projects take many years. This one is finally starting to produce after 25 years or so of building/experiments.

And a farkton of money.

https://lasers.llnl.gov/
 
2021-09-22 3:02:42 AM  
Ah, nothing like the most wasteful way of recharging anything possible.
 
2021-09-22 3:30:48 AM  
Eddy Grant - Electric Avenue
Youtube vtPk5IUbdH0
 
2021-09-22 3:31:12 AM  
Just wait until the guy who hates inductive chargers for phones hears about this.

Yes, inductive chargers are less efficient, but 30% waste on 4200 mAh is nothing compared to 30% waste on 230 Ah (Tesla battery pack)
 
2021-09-22 4:53:59 AM  

TWX: makerofbadjokes: I'd rather see the solar/thermal/crush stress roads that produce electricity from that blend than roads the yeet electricity at the vehicles driving on them.

If your day to day can be sorted with a fully electric, charge it at home, and do what you need to do.  If not, get a hybrid until battery capacity and quick charge tech catches up with the need to go from 0-100% battery in 5-10 minutes.

It's a fun concept, but it is right up there in realism with running an electric car from the wind turbine mounted on its own hood.

[Youtube-video https://www.youtube.com/embed/jyQwgBAa​Bag]


That's a little on the nose - but that is a wind-driven fan-propelled vehicle.  Interesting concept though... not gonna lie.  Yes, I watched the whole video... you monster.
 
2021-09-22 5:06:37 AM  
Michigan and Indiana know damn well that shiat will get smoked in the winter.
 
2021-09-22 5:17:20 AM  

nytmare: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's not clear how the technology would work, how soon the pilot project would be operational or how much it might cost

Your tax dollars at work.

It's a pilot project. Finding out whether the tech works and if it's worth the cost is the whole point.


It won't work.  It can't work.  A 2nd year EE student could have told them that.  Some people just don't want to believe in the laws of thermodynamics.
 
2021-09-22 5:26:58 AM  

hlehmann: .  Some people just don't want to believe in the laws of thermodynamics.


Most things are impossible, right up until they aren't anymore.

I'm not saying that in defense of this particular project - it's probably hosed for a number of reasons.

But exiting earth's gravity was impossible... until we decided it wasn't.
 
2021-09-22 7:05:30 AM  
Not seeing details in the article. I'm imagining a road emitting a magnetic field. Vehicle travelling over it has wire coils that produce electricity when moving through the magnetic field, thus reducing drain on batteries of electric vehicle.
Any farkers know more about this, and can tell me I'm an idiot at the same time?
 
2021-09-22 7:07:10 AM  
So this is going to be constantly producing a field if there is something to charge or not.
 
2021-09-22 7:37:02 AM  

LiberalConservative: Not seeing details in the article. I'm imagining a road emitting a magnetic field. Vehicle travelling over it has wire coils that produce electricity when moving through the magnetic field, thus reducing drain on batteries of electric vehicle.
Any farkers know more about this, and can tell me I'm an idiot at the same time?


If the field is static, all the energy for moving through it comes from the car, resulting magnetic braking and a net loss of energy.
 
2021-09-22 7:55:43 AM  
Michigan roads are already the worst maintained in the country and making them more specialized and expensive to repair isn't going to help. Who pays for the electricity for the roads? Only electric vehicles or all vehicles. Every road would become a toll road. Fark that. Amazon would somehow get tax breaks to offset their tolls and get their energy for free. Semi trucks weigh more and break down the roads faster so it would be best if they had their own lane.

I don't see this being practical with current tech.
 
2021-09-22 8:00:05 AM  

Porous Horace: If I was there I'd be rockin' on to it.


And then we take it higher.

/Oh no!
 
2021-09-22 8:24:31 AM  
The biggest problem in applying any major technology into roads is expense. Asphalt and concrete are almost literally dirt cheap. You add in wiring, circuitry, and everything else needed to make a wireless charger out of it and you've increased the cost at least an order of magnitude and that's being generous.

Road maintenance barely keeps ahead of wear and tear now. Picture how effective your road is when it's maintained less well, and 1/10 as often.
Real costs being probably in the two to three orders of magnitude range above current paving, makes this, and solar roadways and similar schemes, pie in the sky unicorn farts.
 
2021-09-22 9:04:17 AM  

abitofbuffalo: nytmare: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's not clear how the technology would work, how soon the pilot project would be operational or how much it might cost

Your tax dollars at work.

It's a pilot project. Finding out whether the tech works and if it's worth the cost is the whole point.

Usually pilot programs start with a prototype.


Or at least an idea of [technology] how does it f*cking work, a time frame and a budget.
 
2021-09-22 9:06:02 AM  

TWX: nytmare: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's not clear how the technology would work, how soon the pilot project would be operational or how much it might cost

Your tax dollars at work.

It's a pilot project. Finding out whether the tech works and if it's worth the cost is the whole point.

Based on a cursory google search and some articles, it sounds like the known state of the technology is that it is inefficient for 'dynamic applications' (ie moving vehicles) and the process actually damages the asphalt above the buried infrastructure.

So Michigan is probably already used to the damaged roads, but the inefficiency might simply be too great.  I'm also wondering if inducing the charge could pose problems for things like pacemakers, or even for other random shizz that ends up in proximity to the road or to a vehicle traveling on the road.


Yeah, but... Indiana has one.  F*cking Indiana,man.  So you can see why Michigan needed it.
 
2021-09-22 9:19:11 AM  
Yeah, but what about people who wear pacemakers? We're told to keep away from inductive stovetops, let alone bloody inductive roads.
 
2021-09-22 9:20:04 AM  
So, wireless charging means induction technology (magnetic fields, for those who don't know).  Working with induction furnaces for steel, I learned that as the distance of the affected object increases away from the induction coil, the amount of energy needed to produce the same effect increases EXPONENTIALLY!!!!  This means that cars that want to charge wirelessly need to have their charging coil as close to the roadway as possible (within just a few inches) in order to get any effective power.  This means that ALL wirelessly charging vehicles will be right against the road, with little to no shock absorbing ability, and that the roads they travel on have to be in good condition.  They will barely be able to go over small speed bumps in a parking lot, let alone some of the massive ones I've seen.  If you try to put this technology on any taller or raised vehicle, you won't even get enough power to charge a phone.
Try it with a QI charger for your phone.  They have to be right up against the charger to do anything.  The manuals even warn you that if you have too thick of a phone case, it won't charge.  It's not like they have a distance sensor to tell you when the phone is in place.  They actually react to the increased resistance in their field, due to the charging coil on the phone "collecting" the output power.
If you increase the power output in the roadway to be effective at distances above 4-5 inches, you're going to be putting out so much of a magnetic field that you're going to start magnetizing cars, and affecting pacemekers and electronic devices.  And, if I remember right, the human body doesn't do too well when exposed to strong magnetic fields for an extended time either.
 
2021-09-22 9:44:10 AM  
I had my first electric road when I was about 7 years old.
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2021-09-22 10:01:04 AM  

nytmare: Benevolent Misanthrope: It's not clear how the technology would work, how soon the pilot project would be operational or how much it might cost

Your tax dollars at work.

It's a pilot project. Finding out whether the tech works and if it's worth the cost is the whole point.


Spoiler alert: It won't.  This is literally the same idea.

Induction loops are expensive to install, basically impossible to maintain without ripping up the road, and susceptible to damage, which is why they've almost entirely been phased out of use for detecting vehicles at on-demand traffic signals in favor of video detection systems at this point.
 
2021-09-22 10:02:56 AM  

drjekel_mrhyde: Michigan and Indiana know damn well that shiat will get smoked in the winter.


It'd get smoked in Oklahoma, too, which is why all the traffic lights have been reverted to old timey antique 1930s era timer controllers or upgraded to signal-free roundabouts or video detection at this point.
 
2021-09-22 11:06:52 AM  
we have failed to master everyday pavement here.  i don't see the harm in trying something incredibly high-tech and new.
bleeding edge technology for the pavement.  all the pieces to assemble a Blood On the Pavement remark, but i'll leave you to it.
 
2021-09-22 11:13:39 AM  
Yeah, great. And when the inevitable potholes appear, instead of rebar it'll be exposing a grid carrying who knows how many kilowatts. Which will fill with water when it rains. Which will make things most entertaining for people walking on the wet sidewalk near it.
 
2021-09-22 11:30:09 AM  

hlehmann: A 2nd year EE student could have told them that.


I'm a civil engineering dropout and I can tell them that.
 
2021-09-22 12:03:19 PM  
This sounds like a project I would totally trust to a state government.
 
2021-09-22 1:15:47 PM  
The safest and easiest way would be to have magnetic material in the road bed and induction coils and a charging system for the battery in the car.
 
2021-09-22 5:26:48 PM  

Benevolent Misanthrope: It's not clear how the technology would work, how soon the pilot project would be operational or how much it might cost

Your tax dollars at work.


Induction charging isn't exactly an unknown quantity.  The biggest problem is it's not terribly efficient and even a small distance can cause magnetic fields to drop off dramatically, but it's definitely a technology worth investing in, particularly for a state with such a huge stake in the auto industry.

I have a friend who has been talking about this for years, although I think his idea was more practical... put it at bus stops for charging buses.  There you know who is using it and they stop over a very small section of pavement so you don't have to run it long distances.  They don't travel huge overall distances between charging either.
 
2021-09-22 7:21:31 PM  

HoratioGates: I have a friend who has been talking about this for years, although I think his idea was more practical... put it at bus stops for charging buses.


Just put in overhead trolley lines for electric buses.  Like, the answer's right there for that use case.  There's no reason to waste lithium on batteries for farking buses when just investing in the infrastructure is better.  You end up with a lighter, longer lasting, more reliable bus that can run 24/7/365 only heading back to the bus barn for inspection and routine maintenance.  The common connection means regen braking helps vehicles on the circuit that are accelerating or maintaining speed.

There's zero reason to invest in battery electric buses between the higher cost, relatively limited lifespan and electrical inefficiency in charging, and there's -1 reason to even bother doubling down on all that complication by introducing induction charging.  We solved that problem a century ago with trolleypoles.
 
2021-09-22 8:13:00 PM  
Overhead lines create all sorts of issues too.  Powerlines kill birds, they create issues for tall loads, and they are really ugly.

They are making good progress on recycling and downcycling lithium batteries.  For city buses if you are charging regularly as you go you should be able to dramatically lower the size of the batteries.
 
2021-09-22 8:33:15 PM  

HoratioGates: Powerlines kill birds


Well, that's a new and exciting fantasy I've never heard before.

HoratioGates: they create issues for tall loads


So do cities in general.  Tulsa's rife with 14 foot overpasses, low powerlines and traffic lights.  Find me a large city that's not.

HoratioGates: and they are really ugly


Go to Vancouver or Seattle.  You hardly notice them.  Portland has 'em all over the place for the light rail system.  Trust me, they blend in to the cityscape.

HoratioGates: They are making good progress on recycling and downcycling lithium batteries.  For city buses if you are charging regularly as you go you should be able to dramatically lower the size of the batteries.


And you still get a dirtier, more expensive, less reliable, less scalable option than overhead lines.  Might as well pitch Hyperloop or whatever Elon Musk is calling his sewer tunnel Tesla concept these days.
 
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