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(ESPN)   USC football team's plane tips backwards. This is in no way a metaphor for the last decade   (espn.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Idaho, Washington, Trojans' team plane, post-Clay Helton era, Airport, Plane, staff members, plane's nose  
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734 clicks; posted to Sports » on 18 Sep 2021 at 7:53 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



15 Comments     (+0 »)
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2021-09-18 6:39:06 PM  
The players, who sit in the front half of the plane, had exited...
So much for seating the offensive and defensive line in the back
 
2021-09-18 8:12:37 PM  
I didn't even know that was possible.
 
2021-09-18 8:16:01 PM  
Bet it was Poly. Those pranksters!
 
2021-09-18 8:25:32 PM  
I would have guessed a smaller plane. I don't think I've ever heard of that with a 737 before.
 
2021-09-18 8:30:59 PM  
Center of gravity was to the left of those rear wheels.
 
2021-09-18 8:34:38 PM  
Understanding Survivable Crashes?
 
2021-09-18 8:41:44 PM  
They were tipping backward today too until Jaxson Dart went in.
 
2021-09-18 9:13:44 PM  

edmo: I would have guessed a smaller plane. I don't think I've ever heard of that with a 737 before.


-800s, it definitely happens.  Alaska uses one of these almost everywhere they fly with a 737.  Southwest... I've never seen it, but the picture in the link above is obviously a Southwest ramp so they must sometimes.
 
2021-09-18 9:59:52 PM  

TheSubjunctive: edmo: I would have guessed a smaller plane. I don't think I've ever heard of that with a 737 before.

-800s, it definitely happens.  Alaska uses one of these almost everywhere they fly with a 737.  Southwest... I've never seen it, but the picture in the link above is obviously a Southwest ramp so they must sometimes.


Been flying a -800 for the last 7 years. Haven't seen it happen yet. Alaska is he only one who regularly uses a tail stand, but they haul enough freight that it makes sense. United screwed up.
 
2021-09-19 2:58:27 AM  
Rockin' the Carolina Squat.
 
2021-09-19 5:42:22 AM  

TheSubjunctive: edmo: I would have guessed a smaller plane. I don't think I've ever heard of that with a 737 before.

-800s, it definitely happens.  Alaska uses one of these almost everywhere they fly with a 737.  Southwest... I've never seen it, but the picture in the link above is obviously a Southwest ramp so they must sometimes.


SWA flew only -700s in the pre 737MAX days, I thought.
 
2021-09-19 6:46:37 AM  
VTOL attempt unsuccessful. Better luck next time.
 
2021-09-19 9:36:24 AM  

iron_city_ap: TheSubjunctive: edmo: I would have guessed a smaller plane. I don't think I've ever heard of that with a 737 before.

-800s, it definitely happens.  Alaska uses one of these almost everywhere they fly with a 737.  Southwest... I've never seen it, but the picture in the link above is obviously a Southwest ramp so they must sometimes.

Been flying a -800 for the last 7 years. Haven't seen it happen yet. Alaska is he only one who regularly uses a tail stand, but they haul enough freight that it makes sense. United screwed up.


I thought he USC plane was a -900.
 
2021-09-19 10:49:52 AM  
I wonder what method they used to get the nose to come down. In my mind I'm thinking telling all the passengers still on board to take one step forward, hold, another step forward, hold, etc.
 
2021-09-19 11:44:54 AM  
This is why I always stand up and push towards the front as soon as the plane lands!
 
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