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(USA Today)   Whitest paint in the world can help stop climate change. Marco Rubio seen lathering in it   (usatoday.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Sun, whitest paint, Global warming, Guinness World Records, Light, World record, HVAC, barium sulfate  
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709 clicks; posted to STEM » on 17 Sep 2021 at 4:03 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



28 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-09-17 3:06:56 PM  
All good until they figure out the reflected light blinds pilots on approach to airports and they ban it.  Can't have efforts to combat climate change inconvenience the jet set.  No new reflective paint for you.
 
2021-09-17 3:22:11 PM  
Mark Rubio is going to have to fight Ted Cruz and Nikki Haley for it.
 
2021-09-17 3:32:58 PM  
Paint the side of the Sun that faces the Earth with it.

Problem solved!

Duh.  Do I have to think for everyone now??
 
2021-09-17 3:47:19 PM  
We painted our galvanized roof white a few years ago.

After the first summer, it began getting mildewed and discolored. So we washed it.

Same thing next summer and the summer after that we said, "fark this," and it turned black and green.
When the hurricane took it off, we put regular shiny galvanized back up.

/it was cooler in the house
//painter didn't use the mildew-resistant paint we asked for
///salvaged a whole pile of white black and green steel roofing which we used elsewhere
 
2021-09-17 3:55:28 PM  

markie_farkie: Paint the side of the Sun that faces the Earth with it.

Problem solved!

Duh.  Do I have to think for everyone now??


But only at night, when it's cooler.
 
2021-09-17 4:01:52 PM  
Madge, I sat in it!
 
2021-09-17 4:08:48 PM  
Why we make shingles so dark baffles me.  The entire neighborhood I grew up in had white/light-gray asphalt shingles in the 60s, specifically to make the houses cooler.
 
2021-09-17 4:17:12 PM  

FrancoFile: Why we make shingles so dark baffles me.  The entire neighborhood I grew up in had white/light-gray asphalt shingles in the 60s, specifically to make the houses cooler.


For any geographical area with 4 seasons, dark shingles make more sense than light ones, as you will spend more money heating your home than you will cooling it.
 
2021-09-17 4:17:13 PM  
How well does it work when it gets dirty?  It's WHITE for Pete's sake, it is going to always be dirty.
 
2021-09-17 4:19:01 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-09-17 4:20:08 PM  

Driedsponge: FrancoFile: Why we make shingles so dark baffles me.  The entire neighborhood I grew up in had white/light-gray asphalt shingles in the 60s, specifically to make the houses cooler.

For any geographical area with 4 seasons, dark shingles make more sense than light ones, as you will spend more money heating your home than you will cooling it.


How?  They're covered with snow in the winter.
 
2021-09-17 4:24:58 PM  

FrancoFile: Driedsponge: FrancoFile: Why we make shingles so dark baffles me.  The entire neighborhood I grew up in had white/light-gray asphalt shingles in the 60s, specifically to make the houses cooler.

For any geographical area with 4 seasons, dark shingles make more sense than light ones, as you will spend more money heating your home than you will cooling it.

How?  They're covered with snow in the winter.


See the graphic posted, that's a nationwide average.  If you are going to choose a tile color, it makes sense to mass produce the one that helps the most people and cuts the largest of the costs.
 
2021-09-17 4:25:29 PM  
How much more white can it be? The answer is none, none more white.
 
2021-09-17 4:28:22 PM  
On another note, how cool with it look to take the vanta-black BMW and pinstripe the edges with this white?
 
2021-09-17 4:41:05 PM  

Driedsponge: FrancoFile: Driedsponge: FrancoFile: Why we make shingles so dark baffles me.  The entire neighborhood I grew up in had white/light-gray asphalt shingles in the 60s, specifically to make the houses cooler.

For any geographical area with 4 seasons, dark shingles make more sense than light ones, as you will spend more money heating your home than you will cooling it.

How?  They're covered with snow in the winter.

See the graphic posted, that's a nationwide average.  If you are going to choose a tile color, it makes sense to mass produce the one that helps the most people and cuts the largest of the costs.



I understand that.  It still doesn't tell me how having black shingles under a foot of snow is going to help my heating bills.
 
2021-09-17 4:52:36 PM  

FrancoFile: Driedsponge: FrancoFile: Driedsponge: FrancoFile: Why we make shingles so dark baffles me.  The entire neighborhood I grew up in had white/light-gray asphalt shingles in the 60s, specifically to make the houses cooler.

For any geographical area with 4 seasons, dark shingles make more sense than light ones, as you will spend more money heating your home than you will cooling it.

How?  They're covered with snow in the winter.

See the graphic posted, that's a nationwide average.  If you are going to choose a tile color, it makes sense to mass produce the one that helps the most people and cuts the largest of the costs.


I understand that.  It still doesn't tell me how having black shingles under a foot of snow is going to help my heating bills.


If snow is sitting that long on your roof, there's something wrong with the ventilation in your attic.  I live in Rochester, avg 100" of snow a year, and even around here the roof is empty MOST of the winter.
 
2021-09-17 4:54:54 PM  
I've been doing my part. Every time I take my shirt off I reflect enough sunlight to lower the temperature in the area by 2°.
 
2021-09-17 5:19:50 PM  

Too-Tall: All good until they figure out the reflected light blinds pilots on approach to airports and they ban it.  Can't have efforts to combat climate change inconvenience the jet set.  No new reflective paint for you.


Light intensity drops with an inverse square relationship to distance so the curve always looks like this:

Fark user imageView Full Size


If we were dealing with laser light, it might be an issue, for for white light, the drop off is extremely fast. Provided the pilots aren't landing on a goddamn painted roof, they'll be fine. Yeah, it will probably hurt your eyes if you're on the roof itself (like snow blindness) but pilots manage to fly over snow-capped mountains in the middle of the day without issue.
 
2021-09-17 5:34:20 PM  
Insulate the house properly, and heating issues would be reduced.  You also have modern electronics that put out heat, so that is another heat source.  It is also easier to put on a sweater in the winter than take off more clothes in the summer.

Or buildings can have a 2/year roof painting schedule.  In the spring you clean the roof and paint it white for the coming summer.  In the fall you clean the roof and paint it black for the winter.
 
2021-09-17 5:51:06 PM  

Lsherm: Too-Tall: All good until they figure out the reflected light blinds pilots on approach to airports and they ban it.  Can't have efforts to combat climate change inconvenience the jet set.  No new reflective paint for you.

Light intensity drops with an inverse square relationship to distance so the curve always looks like this:

[Fark user image image 743x485]

If we were dealing with laser light, it might be an issue, for for white light, the drop off is extremely fast. Provided the pilots aren't landing on a goddamn painted roof, they'll be fine. Yeah, it will probably hurt your eyes if you're on the roof itself (like snow blindness) but pilots manage to fly over snow-capped mountains in the middle of the day without issue.


Apparently that joke flew over everyone's heads like Evil Kneival over a row of busses.
 
2021-09-17 6:31:30 PM  
I had the hottest apartment in the world, top floor, flat roof, miserable in the summer. I got permission to put some white blinds on a little structure on the roof. It worked great, so much so that I forgot about it til it all came crashing down in a winter storm all over the yard...
 
2021-09-17 9:21:51 PM  
"Because the paint absorbs less heat from the sun than it emits"

So it generates heat? Where does the heat go?
 
2021-09-17 9:59:43 PM  

Driedsponge: FrancoFile: Why we make shingles so dark baffles me.  The entire neighborhood I grew up in had white/light-gray asphalt shingles in the 60s, specifically to make the houses cooler.

For any geographical area with 4 seasons, dark shingles make more sense than light ones, as you will spend more money heating your home than you will cooling it.


Your theory fails for 2 story houses.
 
2021-09-17 10:14:27 PM  

Too-Tall: All good until they figure out the reflected light blinds pilots on approach to airports and they ban it.  Can't have efforts to combat climate change inconvenience the jet set.  No new reflective paint for you.


It would be a diffuse reflection, so that wouldn't happen. A specular reflection is the mirror like reflection that would cause blinding.
 
2021-09-17 10:17:54 PM  

recondite cetacean: "Because the paint absorbs less heat from the sun than it emits"

So it generates heat? Where does the heat go?


It radiates away as infrared to the cold sink of the sky.
 
2021-09-17 10:36:40 PM  

duckpoopy: Driedsponge: FrancoFile: Why we make shingles so dark baffles me.  The entire neighborhood I grew up in had white/light-gray asphalt shingles in the 60s, specifically to make the houses cooler.

For any geographical area with 4 seasons, dark shingles make more sense than light ones, as you will spend more money heating your home than you will cooling it.

Your theory fails for 2 story houses.


No, it doesn't.  The average home pays more in heating than cooling.  If you are mass producing shingles it makes more sense to produce them to be the most useful, regardless of how many stories there are on a house.
 
2021-09-18 2:40:25 AM  
We have something like that on our corrugated metal roof and for the summers around here it's a farking life-saver, not only to keep the place cooler during the the most brutally hot parts of the year but to keep the power cost down from AC usage.
 
2021-09-18 7:20:18 AM  

Driedsponge: duckpoopy: Driedsponge: FrancoFile: Why we make shingles so dark baffles me.  The entire neighborhood I grew up in had white/light-gray asphalt shingles in the 60s, specifically to make the houses cooler.

For any geographical area with 4 seasons, dark shingles make more sense than light ones, as you will spend more money heating your home than you will cooling it.

Your theory fails for 2 story houses.

No, it doesn't.  The average home pays more in heating than cooling.  If you are mass producing shingles it makes more sense to produce them to be the most useful, regardless of how many stories there are on a house.


Fun fact: there is a large enough market for multiple colours of shingles, even when mass produced.

But with multi-story houses the colour should still be darker. Because heat rises so white shingles would cool the higher floor while the heat from the lower floor leaches into the walls and ceiling of the higher floor which would be getting cooled down.

FrancoFile: How? They're covered with snow in the winter.


Not every place with a winter has enough snow fall for it to cover roofs the entire season.
 
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