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(Axios)   Automakers refine technology to prevent dad from going to strip club, mom from talking to Cassidy after yoga and you know how she is so we had to get Starbucks and she had the cutest scarf from Etsy and I was "Where did you get that" and she said   (axios.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Automobile, hot cars, Vehicle, new motor vehicles, Joint Chiefs Chairman Mark Milley, bipartisan infrastructure bill, back seat, such reminders  
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985 clicks; posted to Business » on 15 Sep 2021 at 10:05 AM (11 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-09-15 10:12:08 AM  
Driving the news: The bipartisan infrastructure bill that passed the Senate last month would require new motor vehicles to have an alert system that would remind people to check the back seat upon exiting the car.

The House expects to take up the bill this month.

The law would replace a voluntary commitment by automakers to equip virtually every new car with a rear-seat reminder system by the 2025 model year.

Where it stands: Many new models now come with such reminders via a text message in the instrument cluster, typically accompanied by a chime, when the engine is turned off.


I drove a 2022 Nissan Pathfinder recently that annoyingly honked six times at me whenever I walked away from the vehicle; I finally realized it was the rear-seat reminder.

I repeatedly dismissed the warning on the steering wheel, but to permanently shut it off, I would have had to tinker with the car's settings.

Yeah, that is not helpful.  If that's the end result of the requirement than this is farking stupid.
 
2021-09-15 10:26:00 AM  
I repeatedly dismissed the warning on the steering wheel, but to permanently shut it off, I would have had to tinker with the car's settings.

Oh no!  Not the settings.  Here are some options for help on this for the Children of Buzzfeed who write for Axios:

1.  Open your damn owner's manual.  I know this is the most complicated concept for millions of people, but trust me, the information is in there, and it's very simple.

2.  Google search for a video.  There are a million videos online that will show you how to change nearly any setting on your car.  People love to show off what they know about settings.  Many of them are from dealers showing off the available features.

Or you can just look at what Nissan says to do on the first video:
Nissan USA
4 weeks ago
Hi, Jordan. If your vehicle is equipped with this feature, you can turn off the Rear Door Alert by using the vehicle information display located to the left of the speedometer. Choose "Vehicle Settings," select Rear Door Alert and choose the "Off" option. Thank you.
 
2021-09-15 10:26:34 AM  
Sensors to check for carbon dioxide buildup while temperature rises?  If that combination is detected set off the car's built in alarm and automatically roll down all the windows.
 
2021-09-15 10:27:32 AM  

Rapmaster2000: I repeatedly dismissed the warning on the steering wheel, but to permanently shut it off, I would have had to tinker with the car's settings.

Oh no!  Not the settings.  Here are some options for help on this for the Children of Buzzfeed who write for Axios:

1.  Open your damn owner's manual.  I know this is the most complicated concept for millions of people, but trust me, the information is in there, and it's very simple.

2.  Google search for a video.  There are a million videos online that will show you how to change nearly any setting on your car.  People love to show off what they know about settings.  Many of them are from dealers showing off the available features.

Or you can just look at what Nissan says to do on the first video:
Nissan USA
4 weeks ago
Hi, Jordan. If your vehicle is equipped with this feature, you can turn off the Rear Door Alert by using the vehicle information display located to the left of the speedometer. Choose "Vehicle Settings," select Rear Door Alert and choose the "Off" option. Thank you.


99% of people who will read that:

lh3.googleusercontent.comView Full Size
 
2021-09-15 10:32:51 AM  

NewportBarGuy: Rapmaster2000: I repeatedly dismissed the warning on the steering wheel, but to permanently shut it off, I would have had to tinker with the car's settings.

Oh no!  Not the settings.  Here are some options for help on this for the Children of Buzzfeed who write for Axios:

1.  Open your damn owner's manual.  I know this is the most complicated concept for millions of people, but trust me, the information is in there, and it's very simple.

2.  Google search for a video.  There are a million videos online that will show you how to change nearly any setting on your car.  People love to show off what they know about settings.  Many of them are from dealers showing off the available features.

Or you can just look at what Nissan says to do on the first video:
Nissan USA
4 weeks ago
Hi, Jordan. If your vehicle is equipped with this feature, you can turn off the Rear Door Alert by using the vehicle information display located to the left of the speedometer. Choose "Vehicle Settings," select Rear Door Alert and choose the "Off" option. Thank you.

99% of people who will read that:

[lh3.googleusercontent.com image 338x180] [View Full Size image _x_]


Seriously, I understand that YouTube is somewhat of a menace because of how it shoves morons further down the rabbit hole of dumb conspiracies, but YouTube how-to videos make it worthwhile.  I have fixed the most obscure and random things because of these videos.  If you don't know how to do something on your car/computer/phone, etc - to go YouTube.  I searched for the car seat thingy and there were a ton of results.  The feature has been around since 2017.
 
2021-09-15 10:39:06 AM  

Ravage: Sensors to check for carbon dioxide buildup while temperature rises?  If that combination is detected set off the car's built in alarm and automatically roll down all the windows.


Step 1:  Slip a small tube in through the window (probably just jam a blunt needle through the seal).
Step 2:  Connect to one of those little paintball CO2 tanks and release into the car
Step 3:  CO2 builds up in the car and the windows open
Step 4:  Steal all of the shiat inside.


A good solution to the problem would be something like flashing the lights in the back seat to draw your attention to the back as opposed to an audible/visual alarm in the front of the car.  Alternately you could require the doors to be locked by opening a rear door and then pushing a button on the inside of the rear door.

/chances are the kid would die in the heat before the CO2 built up anyway
 
2021-09-15 10:41:12 AM  
I have 2 daughters , youngest is 26 and I can't believe this is a thing even though I read about kids dying locked in hot cars.

I can't believe you can just forget about or leave your child like that.
 
2021-09-15 10:42:34 AM  

Raider_dad: I have 2 daughters , youngest is 26 and I can't believe this is a thing even though I read about kids dying locked in hot cars.

I can't believe you can just forget about or leave your child like that.


Hint: rear facing car seats
 
2021-09-15 10:43:36 AM  

Rapmaster2000: NewportBarGuy: Rapmaster2000: I repeatedly dismissed the warning on the steering wheel, but to permanently shut it off, I would have had to tinker with the car's settings.

Oh no!  Not the settings.  Here are some options for help on this for the Children of Buzzfeed who write for Axios:

1.  Open your damn owner's manual.  I know this is the most complicated concept for millions of people, but trust me, the information is in there, and it's very simple.

2.  Google search for a video.  There are a million videos online that will show you how to change nearly any setting on your car.  People love to show off what they know about settings.  Many of them are from dealers showing off the available features.

Or you can just look at what Nissan says to do on the first video:
Nissan USA
4 weeks ago
Hi, Jordan. If your vehicle is equipped with this feature, you can turn off the Rear Door Alert by using the vehicle information display located to the left of the speedometer. Choose "Vehicle Settings," select Rear Door Alert and choose the "Off" option. Thank you.

99% of people who will read that:

[lh3.googleusercontent.com image 338x180] [View Full Size image _x_]

Seriously, I understand that YouTube is somewhat of a menace because of how it shoves morons further down the rabbit hole of dumb conspiracies, but YouTube how-to videos make it worthwhile.  I have fixed the most obscure and random things because of these videos.  If you don't know how to do something on your car/computer/phone, etc - to go YouTube.  I searched for the car seat thingy and there were a ton of results.  The feature has been around since 2017.


You're preaching to the choir on this one. I taught myself how to do my brakes, change the thermal fuse on my dryer, do beyond basic plumbing and electrical work... all the stuff I was "scared" of before having videos to help me out.

Without those videos, I'd just be waiting on trade people to come and do it for me at 5-10x the cost of doing it myself.
 
2021-09-15 10:46:13 AM  

NewportBarGuy: You're preaching to the choir on this one. I taught myself how to do my brakes, change the thermal fuse on my dryer, do beyond basic plumbing and electrical work... all the stuff I was "scared" of before having videos to help me out.

Without those videos, I'd just be waiting on trade people to come and do it for me at 5-10x the cost of doing it myself.


My pool robot quit working 3 years ago.  It was 9 years old at the time, so I figured I was in for a $1,000 replacement.  A quick visit to YouTube and all I needed to replace was the bridge rectifier - a $2 part.  It's still working great.
 
2021-09-15 11:23:38 AM  

Ravage: Sensors to check for carbon dioxide buildup while temperature rises?  If that combination is detected set off the car's built in alarm and automatically roll down all the windows.


But then someone could steal my melting permafrost.
 
2021-09-15 11:24:47 AM  

NewportBarGuy: Rapmaster2000: NewportBarGuy: Rapmaster2000: I repeatedly dismissed the warning on the steering wheel, but to permanently shut it off, I would have had to tinker with the car's settings.

Oh no!  Not the settings.  Here are some options for help on this for the Children of Buzzfeed who write for Axios:

1.  Open your damn owner's manual.  I know this is the most complicated concept for millions of people, but trust me, the information is in there, and it's very simple.

2.  Google search for a video.  There are a million videos online that will show you how to change nearly any setting on your car.  People love to show off what they know about settings.  Many of them are from dealers showing off the available features.

Or you can just look at what Nissan says to do on the first video:
Nissan USA
4 weeks ago
Hi, Jordan. If your vehicle is equipped with this feature, you can turn off the Rear Door Alert by using the vehicle information display located to the left of the speedometer. Choose "Vehicle Settings," select Rear Door Alert and choose the "Off" option. Thank you.

99% of people who will read that:

[lh3.googleusercontent.com image 338x180] [View Full Size image _x_]

Seriously, I understand that YouTube is somewhat of a menace because of how it shoves morons further down the rabbit hole of dumb conspiracies, but YouTube how-to videos make it worthwhile.  I have fixed the most obscure and random things because of these videos.  If you don't know how to do something on your car/computer/phone, etc - to go YouTube.  I searched for the car seat thingy and there were a ton of results.  The feature has been around since 2017.

You're preaching to the choir on this one. I taught myself how to do my brakes, change the thermal fuse on my dryer, do beyond basic plumbing and electrical work... all the stuff I was "scared" of before having videos to help me out.

Without those videos, I'd just be waiting on trade people to come and do it for me at 5-10x the cost of doing it myself.


Also now I can at least tell the work I shouldn't touch and should hire a pro after I watch a couple videos that convince me that I could only fark it up
 
2021-09-15 11:26:50 AM  

Fano: NewportBarGuy: Rapmaster2000: NewportBarGuy: Rapmaster2000: I repeatedly dismissed the warning on the steering wheel, but to permanently shut it off, I would have had to tinker with the car's settings.

Oh no!  Not the settings.  Here are some options for help on this for the Children of Buzzfeed who write for Axios:

1.  Open your damn owner's manual.  I know this is the most complicated concept for millions of people, but trust me, the information is in there, and it's very simple.

2.  Google search for a video.  There are a million videos online that will show you how to change nearly any setting on your car.  People love to show off what they know about settings.  Many of them are from dealers showing off the available features.

Or you can just look at what Nissan says to do on the first video:
Nissan USA
4 weeks ago
Hi, Jordan. If your vehicle is equipped with this feature, you can turn off the Rear Door Alert by using the vehicle information display located to the left of the speedometer. Choose "Vehicle Settings," select Rear Door Alert and choose the "Off" option. Thank you.

99% of people who will read that:

[lh3.googleusercontent.com image 338x180] [View Full Size image _x_]

Seriously, I understand that YouTube is somewhat of a menace because of how it shoves morons further down the rabbit hole of dumb conspiracies, but YouTube how-to videos make it worthwhile.  I have fixed the most obscure and random things because of these videos.  If you don't know how to do something on your car/computer/phone, etc - to go YouTube.  I searched for the car seat thingy and there were a ton of results.  The feature has been around since 2017.

You're preaching to the choir on this one. I taught myself how to do my brakes, change the thermal fuse on my dryer, do beyond basic plumbing and electrical work... all the stuff I was "scared" of before having videos to help me out.

Without those videos, I'd just be waiting on trade people to come and do it for me at 5-10x th ...


BINGO!
 
2021-09-15 11:59:18 AM  

Geotpf: I drove a 2022 Nissan Pathfinder recently that annoyingly honked six times at me whenever I walked away from the vehicle; I finally realized it was the rear-seat reminder.


My wife's 2020 Armada does this. It's annoying as shiat, especially when you are getting gas and there is a kid in the back, but overall, it's a good thing.

My ex got caught leaving my <1 yo daughter in the car while she went into Best Buy. I can only hope something like this might help prevent things in the future via a guilt/people are alerted factor. My daughter was safe in the end, but it wasn't a lone incident and she has separation issues now.
 
2021-09-15 12:10:04 PM  
I'm pretty sure every time I was left in the car as a kid it was on purpose. But I'm also not from Florida.
 
2021-09-15 12:22:40 PM  
My aunt left us in the car when she went in to get groceries. Me, my brother and two cousins Two 10 year olds, an 8 year old and a 6 year old. Probably '78-'79
It wasn't that we were locked in or suffering.... it's just that when she came back, the youngest was usually crying, and a couple of us were fighting.
Another time we thought we'd "booby trap" the car when she came back... wipers on, AC fan on high, turn signals, radio on full blast... We laaaughed... she yelled.
I'm sure she loved us when it was her turn to have all of us together for the day.
 
2021-09-15 1:17:30 PM  
Cars need more useless tech in them.  It's bad enough that you cant set something on the passenger seat without the seatbelt alarm going off.  But in 30 years, 1000 kids died, so we need another alarm to ignore.
 
2021-09-15 3:12:59 PM  

Raider_dad: I can't believe you can just forget about or leave your child like that.


It's common enough and there is lots of research done on the human brain to point how it easily happens. It's usually a combination of parents that are out of a routine for some reason, fatigue plays a part, often there is distraction and/or concentration on a lot of other things happening in that day or week of the parent's life, and they combine to where people slip up. For whatever reasons their brain genuinely believes they left the kid where it was supposed to be (daycare or with a nanny or whatever).
 
2021-09-15 3:38:51 PM  
Here is my random thought. A sensor in the back seat like the one for the drivers seat. That detects weight on it. Only do the reminder if there is weight. Could still have false positives from packages but would be better than always triggering the reminder. Child car seats need to be buckled in, correct? Add the seat belt being used to the reminder logic. But these two things would cost $3 extra per car, so the industry would hate that.
Still too much "nanny state", to me.
 
2021-09-15 3:48:47 PM  

FarkingChas: Here is my random thought. A sensor in the back seat like the one for the drivers seat. That detects weight on it. Only do the reminder if there is weight. Could still have false positives from packages but would be better than always triggering the reminder. Child car seats need to be buckled in, correct? Add the seat belt being used to the reminder logic. But these two things would cost $3 extra per car, so the industry would hate that.
Still too much "nanny state", to me.


They are way beyond that weight on seats.

Here's how the sensor-based Hyundai system works. First, when the driver gets out of the car, the dashboard displays a message reminding them to check the rear seats. If the car's ultrasonic sensor detects movement in the rear seat when the vehicle is parked and locked, the car's horn will honk and its lights will flash. If the driver's phone is connected through Hyundai's Blue Link telematics system, a text message will be sent to the phone that movement was detected in the car.
 
2021-09-15 4:14:13 PM  

FarkingChas: Here is my random thought. A sensor in the back seat like the one for the drivers seat. That detects weight on it. Only do the reminder if there is weight. Could still have false positives from packages but would be better than always triggering the reminder. Child car seats need to be buckled in, correct? Add the seat belt being used to the reminder logic. But these two things would cost $3 extra per car, so the industry would hate that.
Still too much "nanny state", to me.


I think you are on the right track.  Most car seats use latch, which involves two hook points in the crease between the seat and the back.  All you would need to do is let that metal latch point serve as the indicator that a carseat is attached(maybe it holds a little potential that discharges when you attach a metal clip, or you need to flip a switch out of the way to access the latch point) .  Just add a little grounding pin type clip to trigger the sensor for all of the carseats that don't utilize latch.
 
2021-09-15 8:19:51 PM  
It is great to see safety. People make Herculean efforts to save others from stupidity. Maybe it works in many cases.

This is just one more reminder of how mfgers and governments have kept adding safety measures one after another like a drumbeat to cut auto-related deaths by 1% here and half a percent there. It also cheeses me to think that newcomers just think that they can ignore all of that and push out a product without meeting basic market norms for safety.

I will just come out and say it. Tesla is leaving the US market wide open for exploitation by Chinese firms. How? By getting the NHTSA to roll over, Tesla is lowering non-tariff barriers that protect the US market from firms that don't care about safety. Companies should have to pay their dues and pray to the safety gods before being allowed to sell cars in the US. All Chinese companies have to do now is claim that their safety record is as good as Tesla's, or Takata's, or GM's, and then claim racism or discrimination if that gets questioned. The US set the bar VERY high for decades, and then dropped it on the ground while Tesla grew its business. If standards do not come up quickly, the US will get bum-rushed by new vehicles with questionable safety.
 
2021-09-15 8:37:54 PM  

Raider_dad: I have 2 daughters , youngest is 26 and I can't believe this is a thing even though I read about kids dying locked in hot cars.

I can't believe you can just forget about or leave your child like that.


It is a psychological fault in human beings.
 
2021-09-15 8:40:15 PM  
Required reading. It is highly unpleasant and haunting, but it's a Pulitzer-Prize-winning article about why it is that some people somehow end up leaving children in cars.

No, it isn't as simple as "It's neglect and they're terrible parents."

/never won't post this.
 
2021-09-15 9:32:09 PM  

Raider_dad: I have 2 daughters , youngest is 26 and I can't believe this is a thing even though I read about kids dying locked in hot cars.

I can't believe you can just forget about or leave your child like that.


You can't talk check your phone for text messages while driving. As soon as they park, they check and reply to messages. Then they get out of the car to go wherever. Their minds are still on the phone messages. Looks easy to forget. Have you ever forgotten what you went to the kitchen to get?
 
2021-09-15 10:39:19 PM  

Raider_dad: I have 2 daughters , youngest is 26 and I can't believe this is a thing even though I read about kids dying locked in hot cars.

I can't believe you can just forget about or leave your child like that.


They had to check Instagram.
 
2021-09-16 4:25:59 AM  

Raider_dad: I have 2 daughters , youngest is 26 and I can't believe this is a thing even though I read about kids dying locked in hot cars.

I can't believe you can just forget about or leave your child like that.


Me too, and then I read a Pulitzer-winning article that interviewed parents that lost kids that way and I realized : "shiat, that could happen to me too!"
 
2021-09-16 4:33:51 AM  

2fardownthread: It is great to see safety. People make Herculean efforts to save others from stupidity. Maybe it works in many cases.

This is just one more reminder of how mfgers and governments have kept adding safety measures one after another like a drumbeat to cut auto-related deaths by 1% here and half a percent there. It also cheeses me to think that newcomers just think that they can ignore all of that and push out a product without meeting basic market norms for safety.

I will just come out and say it. Tesla is leaving the US market wide open for exploitation by Chinese firms. How? By getting the NHTSA to roll over, Tesla is lowering non-tariff barriers that protect the US market from firms that don't care about safety. Companies should have to pay their dues and pray to the safety gods before being allowed to sell cars in the US. All Chinese companies have to do now is claim that their safety record is as good as Tesla's, or Takata's, or GM's, and then claim racism or discrimination if that gets questioned. The US set the bar VERY high for decades, and then dropped it on the ground while Tesla grew its business. If standards do not come up quickly, the US will get bum-rushed by new vehicles with questionable safety.


Ya, like AutoPilot...
 
2021-09-16 6:35:35 AM  

austerity101: Required reading. It is highly unpleasant and haunting, but it's a Pulitzer-Prize-winning article about why it is that some people somehow end up leaving children in cars.

No, it isn't as simple as "It's neglect and they're terrible parents."

/never won't post this.


Thanks for posting this. Great piece.

Oh, and Fark, so PAYWALL OMG 11!!!!!! SOMEONE GOT PAID I CAN'T HAZ FREI INTERNET HALP!!!!11111
 
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