Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(YouTube)   Want to watch Star Wars, but can't afford that streaming subscription?   (youtube.com) divider line
    More: Amusing  
•       •       •

884 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 14 Sep 2021 at 3:35 PM (12 days ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



44 Comments     (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2021-09-14 3:24:37 PM  
My takeaway from this is that literally every line from the original Star Wars is quotable and iconic. For a guy who would go on to write some really wonky dialogue later, Lucas really knocked it out of the park on that one.
 
2021-09-14 3:39:01 PM  
Star Wars Minus Star Wars - Between the Lines
Youtube -gUKYBs6T8c


A more interesting take on the same concept
 
2021-09-14 3:41:21 PM  
Impressively fast boring skills, young padwanmitter.
 
2021-09-14 3:44:13 PM  
$ telnet towel.blinkenlights.nl
 
2021-09-14 3:45:06 PM  
I'm sure Hidden Fortress will be going public domain soon.  Starring Toshiro Mifune as General Ben Kenobi.
 
2021-09-14 3:50:32 PM  

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: I'm sure Hidden Fortress will be going public domain soon.  Starring Toshiro Mifune as General Ben Kenobi.


Settle down Mister Campbell.
 
2021-09-14 3:50:37 PM  
I dunno, using so much from Family Guy's Blue Harvest seems like cheating.
 
2021-09-14 3:52:13 PM  
I'd like to see the last movie, only because I've seen the rest of them. But somehow I get the feeling that it's never going to show up in a Redbox machine or a Walmart DVD bin, though plenty of better movies have. I'm sure as hell not going to get a Disney+ subscription for it.
 
2021-09-14 3:56:17 PM  

Garza and the Supermutants: I'd like to see the last movie, only because I've seen the rest of them. But somehow I get the feeling that it's never going to show up in a Redbox machine or a Walmart DVD bin, though plenty of better movies have. I'm sure as hell not going to get a Disney+ subscription for it.


Check the used bookstores around any college campus. You might find a BluRay or six for cheap.
 
2021-09-14 3:58:16 PM  

optikeye: Settle down Mister Campbell.


In this case, it's much less "hey these two stories are similar - what a coincidence" and much more explicitly remaking that movie, but in space.

Also, I'm not knocking it - it was an absolutely brilliant and mutually beneficial move (American audiences originally rejected the Kurosawa film; Lucas made them appreciate it). But the premise was "If every copy of Star Wars was destroyed, could we recreate A New Hope from non-Lucasfilm projects?".

And the answer is yes - and a pretty big chunk of Phantom Menace too, which revisited the parts that A New Hope didn't use.
 
2021-09-14 4:05:39 PM  

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: In this case, it's much less "hey these two stories are similar - what a coincidence" and much more explicitly remaking that movie, but in space.


Wait until you hear about Clint Eastwood "The Magnificent Seven" and the Seven Samurai.
It's just retailing the same tale.....a tale as old as time.

Heck Forbidden Planet was basically Shakespeare "The Tempest" in space with a robot.
West Side Story was Romeo and Juliet in New York.

It's been happening before film and will be happening for farkenever. There isn't "Gotcha CHEATER Moment" in there.
 
2021-09-14 4:06:22 PM  
i mean, most of the clips are Family Guy, which basically did the whole movie with Lucasfilm blessings.
 
2021-09-14 4:06:53 PM  
Bittorrent I hear is still a viable option...
 
2021-09-14 4:13:08 PM  

optikeye: It's been happening before film and will be happening for farkenever. There isn't "Gotcha CHEATER Moment" in there.


Also, I'm not knocking it - it was an absolutely brilliant and mutually beneficial move

Heh. I wanna channel Melissa McCarthy and growl about rubbing your f*cking face in it, you silly-billy.

media1.giphy.comView Full Size
 
2021-09-14 4:14:23 PM  

Garza and the Supermutants: I'd like to see the last movie, only because I've seen the rest of them. But somehow I get the feeling that it's never going to show up in a Redbox machine or a Walmart DVD bin, though plenty of better movies have. I'm sure as hell not going to get a Disney+ subscription for it.


It was at Redbox.  That's almost two years old at this point.
 
2021-09-14 4:18:43 PM  
I thought they were all posted on pornhub or something similar.
 
2021-09-14 4:24:04 PM  

optikeye: MusicMakeMyHeadPound: I'm sure Hidden Fortress will be going public domain soon.  Starring Toshiro Mifune as General Ben Kenobi.

Settle down Mister Campbell.


Episode 4 at least was specifically a remake of Hidden Fortress as an individual movie, with Campbell's book sort of filling in the cracks and guiding how it was adapted for western audiences.

Campbell's work in general is also kinda... not really descriptive of any actual phenomenon that exists, the reason a lot of movies made after he published the book follow a loose version of his rules is that after the unprecedented success of Star Wars people intending to write movies started consciously using it as a guide.  Similar to the three-act structure, it's an intentional addition to the language of storytelling that's much newer than you think in most ways.  Like... sure, you can cherry-pick older stories that match Campbell's theory (that's basically what he did to "confirm" it in the first place), but pick a cross-section of things at random prior to 1977 and you'll wonder what the fark he's on about because nothing in the book is actually, like... true.  It is a structure for stories that works well, but there's nothing special about it over many other equally-valid methods.

Like... Star Wars' success being due to following Campbell's mythos isn't a real thing some actual expert posited, you heard about it because it's why George Lucas thinks the movie worked.  See the Prequels for how well George Lucas actually understands why the original three movies worked.
 
2021-09-14 4:27:46 PM  

Jim_Callahan: It is a structure for stories that works well, but there's nothing special about it over many other equally-valid methods.


Dan Harmon's method is especially fascinating to me and can be retroactively applied to A New Hope
 
2021-09-14 4:34:48 PM  

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Jim_Callahan: It is a structure for stories that works well, but there's nothing special about it over many other equally-valid methods.

Dan Harmon's method is especially fascinating to me and can be retroactively applied to A New Hope


Harmon's Story Wheel is really what got me into Rick and Morty in the first place.

So it's a shame that they literally mock that kind of storytelling in later seasons.

Oblig:
How RICK & MORTY Tells A Story (The Ricks Must Be Crazy) - Wisecrack Edition
Youtube l_c2hqmFBdM
 
2021-09-14 4:57:30 PM  

EdgeRunner: Garza and the Supermutants: I'd like to see the last movie, only because I've seen the rest of them. But somehow I get the feeling that it's never going to show up in a Redbox machine or a Walmart DVD bin, though plenty of better movies have. I'm sure as hell not going to get a Disney+ subscription for it.

Check the used bookstores around any college campus. You might find a BluRay or six for cheap.


mjbok: Garza and the Supermutants: I'd like to see the last movie, only because I've seen the rest of them. But somehow I get the feeling that it's never going to show up in a Redbox machine or a Walmart DVD bin, though plenty of better movies have. I'm sure as hell not going to get a Disney+ subscription for it.

It was at Redbox.  That's almost two years old at this point.


Thanks for the leads!
 
2021-09-14 5:07:45 PM  

skyotter: So it's a shame that they literally mock that kind of storytelling in later seasons.


That episode was goddamn genius, I'm okay with it.

Harmon Wheel is trying to get what it wants (at a terrible price) so that it can come back changed.
 
2021-09-14 5:20:05 PM  

optikeye: Wait until you hear about Clint Eastwood "The Magnificent Seven" and the Seven Samurai.


Clint Eastwood wasn't involved with The Magnificent Seven, and the Magnificent Seven was explicitly a remake of Seven Samurai. It wasn't a secret or a case of "borrowing" the story. They acquired the rights to do it.

Star Wars, not so much. It was never overtly said to be a remake of The Hidden Fortress (though it was) and Lucas did not acquire the rights to do it. He just took a ton of the story and made it his own.

Lucas did pay Kurosawa back big time, however, by helping him secure the funding he needed to finish Kagemusha, which is not only a fantastic film, it re-started Kurosawa's stalled out career and led directly to the making of one of his great masterpieces, Ran.

Lucas has also spent his entire adult life championing Kurosawa's work, has made no secret of how influential Kurosawa was to him, and likely exposed countless young film aficionados to his work, so in my estimation his debt is paid.

Anyway, the main point is that the two examples aren't comparable. The Magnificent Seven was a licensed remake with no secret behind its origins, whereas Lucas lifted The Hidden Fortress' plot without ever directly crediting it.

I don't think that's some horrible thing, you're correct in saying that stories have been retold countless times for as long as humans have been telling stories, but we should at least acknowledge it for what it is and given The Hidden Fortress the credit its due.
 
2021-09-14 5:32:57 PM  

shoegaze99: whereas Lucas lifted The Hidden Fortress' plot without ever directly crediting it.


Oh please. It could have influenced. Much like every "beauty and the best' movie ever.
It's a escort quest movie with a overlay of 'hidden prince of royal lineage" (luke) and kidnapped princess (Leia), that's been around since the Iliad and Odyssey. It's not an original story line...but to say it was "Hidden Fortress" you need to set your way back machine to see what tales influenced Hidden Fortress.
When you say "Lifted" you mean influenced. Heck Jaws was Moby Dick if you go down that route.

As film making goes...SW owes more to Flash Gordon and Tarzan than some Japanese flick.
But I wouldn't say Lucas "Lifted" flash gordon.
 
2021-09-14 5:38:37 PM  

Garza and the Supermutants: I'd like to see the last movie, only because I've seen the rest of them. But somehow I get the feeling that it's never going to show up in a Redbox machine or a Walmart DVD bin, though plenty of better movies have. I'm sure as hell not going to get a Disney+ subscription for it.


Have you checked your public library?
 
2021-09-14 5:39:49 PM  
Did lucas also "lift" the plot point of a child of royal lineage. "Hidden way" like in a basket, like Moses.
Or Thesis Sargon of greek mythology.  Then they learn their heritage and recive a magical weapon. (A sword, a bow, a shield, flying boots...etc)

These stories are in our myological DNA as humans.
There's no "Lifted" there for these things as a plot point any more than choosing the color blue from a paint box.
 
2021-09-14 5:41:17 PM  

Jim_Callahan: optikeye: MusicMakeMyHeadPound: I'm sure Hidden Fortress will be going public domain soon.  Starring Toshiro Mifune as General Ben Kenobi.

Settle down Mister Campbell.

Episode 4 at least was specifically a remake of Hidden Fortress as an individual movie, with Campbell's book sort of filling in the cracks and guiding how it was adapted for western audiences.

Campbell's work in general is also kinda... not really descriptive of any actual phenomenon that exists, the reason a lot of movies made after he published the book follow a loose version of his rules is that after the unprecedented success of Star Wars people intending to write movies started consciously using it as a guide.  Similar to the three-act structure, it's an intentional addition to the language of storytelling that's much newer than you think in most ways.  Like... sure, you can cherry-pick older stories that match Campbell's theory (that's basically what he did to "confirm" it in the first place), but pick a cross-section of things at random prior to 1977 and you'll wonder what the fark he's on about because nothing in the book is actually, like... true.  It is a structure for stories that works well, but there's nothing special about it over many other equally-valid methods.

Like... Star Wars' success being due to following Campbell's mythos isn't a real thing some actual expert posited, you heard about it because it's why George Lucas thinks the movie worked.  See the Prequels for how well George Lucas actually understands why the original three movies worked.


Star Wars also gave Hollywood a superstitious attachment to the idea of trilogies, especially ones where the middle entry ends on a cliffhanger setting up the third movie. Back to the Future, the Matrix, and Pirates of the Caribbean all repeated that formula, and you'll still hear filmmakers talk about intended trilogies (like Jupiter Ascending, Zack Snyder's Justice League, even Mamma Mia) as if a three part movie series is the ideal length. But in practice, if audiences like something they'll want more than just two sequels (especially for horror franchises), while other ideas don't need to be padded out that long (we really don't need another Mamma Mia, okay? We didn't really need those Matrix sequels either, even though the staircase fight was pretty cool).
 
2021-09-14 5:42:30 PM  

optikeye: When you say "Lifted" you mean influenced.


I said what I meant.

Allow me to say it again: He lifted the story from The Hidden Fortress.


optikeye: Heck Jaws was Moby Dick if you go down that route.


LOL!!
 
2021-09-14 5:55:05 PM  

shoegaze99: optikeye: Wait until you hear about Clint Eastwood "The Magnificent Seven" and the Seven Samurai.

Clint Eastwood wasn't involved with The Magnificent Seven, and the Magnificent Seven was explicitly a remake of Seven Samurai. It wasn't a secret or a case of "borrowing" the story. They acquired the rights to do it.

Star Wars, not so much. It was never overtly said to be a remake of The Hidden Fortress (though it was) and Lucas did not acquire the rights to do it. He just took a ton of the story and made it his own.

Lucas did pay Kurosawa back big time, however, by helping him secure the funding he needed to finish Kagemusha, which is not only a fantastic film, it re-started Kurosawa's stalled out career and led directly to the making of one of his great masterpieces, Ran.

Lucas has also spent his entire adult life championing Kurosawa's work, has made no secret of how influential Kurosawa was to him, and likely exposed countless young film aficionados to his work, so in my estimation his debt is paid.

Anyway, the main point is that the two examples aren't comparable. The Magnificent Seven was a licensed remake with no secret behind its origins, whereas Lucas lifted The Hidden Fortress' plot without ever directly crediting it.

I don't think that's some horrible thing, you're correct in saying that stories have been retold countless times for as long as humans have been telling stories, but we should at least acknowledge it for what it is and given The Hidden Fortress the credit its due.


Just because you didn't mention it, for those who don't know, the Clint Eastwood thing is about Fistful of Dollars being a remake of (vastly superior) Yojimbo.
 
2021-09-14 5:55:32 PM  

EdgeRunner: Jim_Callahan: optikeye: MusicMakeMyHeadPound: I'm sure Hidden Fortress will be going public domain soon.  Starring Toshiro Mifune as General Ben Kenobi.

Settle down Mister Campbell.

Episode 4 at least was specifically a remake of Hidden Fortress as an individual movie, with Campbell's book sort of filling in the cracks and guiding how it was adapted for western audiences.

Campbell's work in general is also kinda... not really descriptive of any actual phenomenon that exists, the reason a lot of movies made after he published the book follow a loose version of his rules is that after the unprecedented success of Star Wars people intending to write movies started consciously using it as a guide.  Similar to the three-act structure, it's an intentional addition to the language of storytelling that's much newer than you think in most ways.  Like... sure, you can cherry-pick older stories that match Campbell's theory (that's basically what he did to "confirm" it in the first place), but pick a cross-section of things at random prior to 1977 and you'll wonder what the fark he's on about because nothing in the book is actually, like... true.  It is a structure for stories that works well, but there's nothing special about it over many other equally-valid methods.

Like... Star Wars' success being due to following Campbell's mythos isn't a real thing some actual expert posited, you heard about it because it's why George Lucas thinks the movie worked.  See the Prequels for how well George Lucas actually understands why the original three movies worked.

Star Wars also gave Hollywood a superstitious attachment to the idea of trilogies, especially ones where the middle entry ends on a cliffhanger setting up the third movie. Back to the Future, the Matrix, and Pirates of the Caribbean all repeated that formula, and you'll still hear filmmakers talk about intended trilogies (like Jupiter Ascending, Zack Snyder's Justice League, even Mamma Mia) as if a three part movie series ...


That's mostly because of short attention spans and 'butts in the seats' theaters.
Long form movies like "Mad Mad World" or "Lawrence of Arabia" or "Doctor Zhivago" wouldn't play well today when they need to turn over seats.
Some stories need a long telling. Heck "Gone with the Wind" is a butt numathon seeing it a theater. And Orson Wells did the same with his long form movies.
Nothing new here.
As for Sequils. Star War's DNA is more Flash Gordon, Tarzan and Buck Rodgers.
All of those 'one reel' movies where played before the major movie with "But WAIT.....what will happen, clif cliffhanger " Not new at all. There was also "Perils of Pauline" movies that ended in a cliff hangers in the 20's.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Per​i​ls_of_Pauline_(1914_serial)

as for marketing. They had a prize.
And the abducted princess. Isn't a new thing...it's just widget to tell a story. From Sinbad to Indiana Jones to Star War...it's literally complaining using Blue in a painting saying it's 'lifted'

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2021-09-14 6:06:04 PM  

cousin-merle: Just because you didn't mention it, for those who don't know, the Clint Eastwood thing is about Fistful of Dollars being a remake of (vastly superior) Yojimbo.


Yeah, I probably should have mentioned that. Fistful (directed by Sergio Leone) was so direct a ripoff, Toho Studios sued and won. (Eastwood himself had nothing to do with the story being lifted; at the time, he was just a small time American actor hired to play a role.)

Kurosawa liked the movie and thought it was a good remake, he liked Leone's work, but he and his studio obviously didn't want it lifted so thoroughly.

Leone went on to develop his own voice, of course, which resulted in masterpieces like Once Upon A Time in the West (IMO perhaps the second greatest western ever made) and Once Upon A Time in America.

As for Yojimbo, I think I'm in the minority in that I like Sanjuro just a little better. Just a little,, but I enjoy the way that one plays out a little more.
 
2021-09-14 6:08:36 PM  

optikeye: That's mostly because of short attention spans and 'butts in the seats' theaters.
Long form movies like "Mad Mad World" or "Lawrence of Arabia" or "Doctor Zhivago" wouldn't play well today when they need to turn over seats.
Some stories need a long telling. Heck "Gone with the Wind" is a butt numathon seeing it a theater. And Orson Wells did the same with his long form movies.
Nothing new here.
As for Sequils. Star War's DNA is more Flash Gordon, Tarzan and Buck Rodgers.
All of those 'one reel' movies where played before the major movie with "But WAIT.....what will happen, clif cliffhanger " Not new at all. There was also "Perils of Pauline" movies that ended in a cliff hangers in the 20's.


You're missing the point. Filmmakers talk about trilogies like that's a magical thing. The three act structure broken into individual films. But in practice it's just superstition. That's how Star Wars did it, so that's what you do. But even Star Wars wasn't intended to be a trilogy. It could have been a one-and-done if the first one didn't succeed, or just Star Wars and Splinter of the Mind's Eye if it had only moderately succeeded. Empire ended on its cliffhanger after a series of rewrites, and Jedi became the final entry because Lucas was worn out by the intense undertaking each movie had become and wanted a break. There could have been four or five or even ten OT Star Wars movies. They only stopped due to circumstances and creative exhaustion, not any narrative constraint.

Pirates of the Caribbean is a perfect example. The first movie is a standalone tale, but it became a wildfire hit so Disney didn't just order up a sequel, but a trilogy. For a series that wasn't set up for the expansive storytelling of a trilogy, and had to
 
2021-09-14 6:11:10 PM  
introduce a new big bad to stretch things out. But after that trilogy did well financially but not critically, they just started doing regular standalone sequels instead of a second trilogy. They wised up that they didn't have grand epic material to work with, and sequels were just fine.
 
2021-09-14 6:11:26 PM  

shoegaze99: optikeye: Heck Jaws was Moby Dick if you go down that route.


LOL!!


Yup.. Jaws was pretty much moby dick with "Quint" character.
It's a revenge story. "Quint" pretty much lays it out that he's in it for revenge, like Ahab the shark was about obsession for revenge. It was personal.

https://crimereads.com/on-the-endless​-​symbolism-of-jaws-which-owes-its-dark-​soul-to-moby-dick/
 
2021-09-14 6:13:51 PM  

EdgeRunner: The three act structure broken into individual films. But in practice it's just superstition. That's how Star Wars did it, so that's what you do.


Nope..Nope Nope.

They break their movies down to several films because NO ONE WANT TO SIT IN A THEATER FOR 9 HOURS LIKE A PHILIP GLASS OPERA.
 
2021-09-14 6:56:41 PM  
If you want to know WHY this exists, see the full video at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UB6yF​e​wRszo
 
2021-09-14 7:29:47 PM  

cousin-merle: Just because you didn't mention it, for those who don't know, the Clint Eastwood thing is about Fistful of Dollars being a remake of (vastly superior) Yojimbo.


... a lot of y'all are reacting like pointing out that ANH is "Hidden Fortress but American" or the various Western adaptations were similar cultural translations is a slam against those movies, requiring that they be "defended" from the accusation.

That's... not really what's going on, here.  This was basically just a thing that was pretty normal for movies in general at the time, and really all the way through the '80s (during which the blockbuster model took over the industry).  You'd actually see shiat advertised explicitly as "The Maltese Falcon but with Ninjas" or whatever in trailers or on posters... the reason Kurosawa didn't tend to get credit was basically that Americans wouldn't have heard of him so it was no advantage to put it in the marketing.

Kurosawa's reaction to being adapted was generally mild annoyance at the worst and usually fairly approving, iirc, though if someone has a quote to the opposite effect feel free to supply it.  He himself was fairly intentionally adapting "western" stories for a Japanese audience in the first place with a lot of his films, though, so it's definitely not like he was opposed to the practice as such.  His relationship with Lucas was actually pretty fanboy on the Lucas end, Lucasarts helped fund one of his later movies unless I'm remembering that entirely wrong.

// "X, but a western" might as well have been its own genre, it was like a third of the free-standing movies that weren't adapted off a TV franchise that was already a western.
 
2021-09-14 8:47:48 PM  
...or you can watch the best version of RotS, which is still, somehow, still on Youtube after 5 years. Star War the Third Gathers: Backstroke of the West.

Star War The Third Gathers: Backstroke of the West HD (Dubbed)
Youtube XziLNeFm1ok
 
2021-09-14 9:44:10 PM  

optikeye: EdgeRunner: The three act structure broken into individual films. But in practice it's just superstition. That's how Star Wars did it, so that's what you do.

Nope..Nope Nope.

They break their movies down to several films because NO ONE WANT TO SIT IN A THEATER FOR 9 HOURS LIKE A PHILIP GLASS OPERA.


No and still no. Empire and Jedi weren't written as a single movie split into two. Empire just ended on a cliffhanger like the matinee serials that Lucas loved so much. You mentioned that yourself, remember?

There was never any intention to film Empire and Jedi as a single four hour movie that was broken into two parts. Also, the average movie length during the 70s and 80s was around 90 minutes. Nowadays epic movies run approximately 3 hours. If there was some rule that movies can't be over 2 hours, Infinity War and Endgame would have been 3 movies instead of just 2.
 
2021-09-14 9:50:43 PM  
The FG stuff is a cheat as a lot of that stuff is rotoscoped IIRC
 
2021-09-14 11:10:38 PM  

Garza and the Supermutants: I'd like to see the last movie, only because I've seen the rest of them. But somehow I get the feeling that it's never going to show up in a Redbox machine or a Walmart DVD bin, though plenty of better movies have. I'm sure as hell not going to get a Disney+ subscription for it.


I saw the original trilogy in theater when I was young.  By the time the Ewoks appeared I was just old enough to start noticing how silly the whole Ewok thing was and how it didn't really fit in with the previous movies.  But I saw all three, and mostly the first two have the most stuck in my memory with the most clarity.

Then came the prequel trilogy.  I watched the first in theater, the second I don't know where I saw it, but it was long after release and I didn't pay.  The third I ignored. Then came the sequel trilogy.  Man, they pissed me off with that stupid first movie that was obviously just network execs pandering to focus groups.  Really annoyed me that I paid to see it.  As with the prequels, I watched the second much later for free, and ignored the third.

It's like they had good ideas, then said, "I know what we do with these scripts - we eat them, then we produce the shiat that comes out afterwards!"

Rogue One is the only good modern Star Wars movie, and I'm a fan of The Mandalorian (though it has more than a few faults, I think it's pretty good).

Don't feel like you're missing something just because you're avoiding crap.  It's crap.  That's why you're deliberately missing it.
 
2021-09-15 9:22:08 AM  

EdgeRunner: Jim_Callahan: optikeye: MusicMakeMyHeadPound: I'm sure Hidden Fortress will be going public domain soon.  Starring Toshiro Mifune as General Ben Kenobi.

Settle down Mister Campbell.

Episode 4 at least was specifically a remake of Hidden Fortress as an individual movie, with Campbell's book sort of filling in the cracks and guiding how it was adapted for western audiences.

Campbell's work in general is also kinda... not really descriptive of any actual phenomenon that exists, the reason a lot of movies made after he published the book follow a loose version of his rules is that after the unprecedented success of Star Wars people intending to write movies started consciously using it as a guide.  Similar to the three-act structure, it's an intentional addition to the language of storytelling that's much newer than you think in most ways.  Like... sure, you can cherry-pick older stories that match Campbell's theory (that's basically what he did to "confirm" it in the first place), but pick a cross-section of things at random prior to 1977 and you'll wonder what the fark he's on about because nothing in the book is actually, like... true.  It is a structure for stories that works well, but there's nothing special about it over many other equally-valid methods.

Like... Star Wars' success being due to following Campbell's mythos isn't a real thing some actual expert posited, you heard about it because it's why George Lucas thinks the movie worked.  See the Prequels for how well George Lucas actually understands why the original three movies worked.

Star Wars also gave Hollywood a superstitious attachment to the idea of trilogies, especially ones where the middle entry ends on a cliffhanger setting up the third movie. Back to the Future, the Matrix, and Pirates of the Caribbean all repeated that formula, and you'll still hear filmmakers talk about intended trilogies (like Jupiter Ascending, Zack Snyder's Justice League, even Mamma Mia) as if a three part movie series ...


The trilogy is an extension of the 3-act-play structure that has been used for eons.
 
2021-09-15 10:31:55 AM  

Gonzo317: EdgeRunner: Jim_Callahan: optikeye: MusicMakeMyHeadPound: I'm sure Hidden Fortress will be going public domain soon.  Starring Toshiro Mifune as General Ben Kenobi.

Settle down Mister Campbell.

Episode 4 at least was specifically a remake of Hidden Fortress as an individual movie, with Campbell's book sort of filling in the cracks and guiding how it was adapted for western audiences.

Campbell's work in general is also kinda... not really descriptive of any actual phenomenon that exists, the reason a lot of movies made after he published the book follow a loose version of his rules is that after the unprecedented success of Star Wars people intending to write movies started consciously using it as a guide.  Similar to the three-act structure, it's an intentional addition to the language of storytelling that's much newer than you think in most ways.  Like... sure, you can cherry-pick older stories that match Campbell's theory (that's basically what he did to "confirm" it in the first place), but pick a cross-section of things at random prior to 1977 and you'll wonder what the fark he's on about because nothing in the book is actually, like... true.  It is a structure for stories that works well, but there's nothing special about it over many other equally-valid methods.

Like... Star Wars' success being due to following Campbell's mythos isn't a real thing some actual expert posited, you heard about it because it's why George Lucas thinks the movie worked.  See the Prequels for how well George Lucas actually understands why the original three movies worked.

Star Wars also gave Hollywood a superstitious attachment to the idea of trilogies, especially ones where the middle entry ends on a cliffhanger setting up the third movie. Back to the Future, the Matrix, and Pirates of the Caribbean all repeated that formula, and you'll still hear filmmakers talk about intended trilogies (like Jupiter Ascending, Zack Snyder's Justice League, even Mamma Mia) as if a three part m ...


You are giving the film makers too much credit.
 
2021-09-15 1:18:38 PM  

Gonzo317: The trilogy is an extension of the 3-act-play structure that has been used for eons.


Not the way it's been used. An actual three act structure means there's a single cohesive story that's split into thirds. The original Star Wars, BTTF, POTC, and the Matrix are all self-contained movies, and you don't need to see any of the sequels to know how that initial story ended. There were only more installments because the first one was successful, not because the story wasn't finished.

Empire retconned Vader into Luke's father to expand the story, something which flat out contradicted the first movie and had to be awkwardly explained away by Obi Wan admitting he's an unreliable source. BTTF 2 gave Marty a new character arc where he had to overcome his inability to turn down a dare, a character trait he never had in the original. POTC 2 introduced an entirely new villain, different stakes, and a fresh adventure. And the Matrix 2 and 3 never figured out what they were trying to do and were all over the place. None of them had preconceived ideas for a followup (no, not even Star Wars, no matter what George "conveniently forgetting about Splinter of the Mind's Eye" Lucas has claimed), and BTTF 2 and 3 were particularly challenging for the filmmakers because the first one wasn't intended to have any sequels. And the Star Wars prequels and sequels were trilogies solely because the original series was a trilogy. The way they were actually assembled, the prequels might have benefited from at least one more film to flesh out all the details, and the sequel trilogy's "story" is so shallow and random, it could have worked better as just two movies of haphazard nonsense instead of three. Less definitely would have been more.

About the only intentional trilogy Hollywood has ever made was the Lord of the Rings, because its source material came from three different books. But again, adhering to the superstition that trilogies are lucky at the box office, they tried to stretch the Hobbit into three movies as well, and that was a disaster.
 
2021-09-15 9:29:47 PM  

skyotter: I dunno, using so much from Family Guy's Blue Harvest seems like cheating.


Yup, if they're going to use clips from the Family Guy spoof, they might as well just play the whole thing and axe the other clips.
 
Displayed 44 of 44 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.